Toddlers hidden in their monochromatic possessions explores gender and color

Toddlers hidden in their monochromatic possessions explores gender and color

Pink for girls and blue for boys– this may be a simple decision for many parents, but when South Korean artist JeongMee Yoon witnessed her daughter’s near-obsession with pink objects, Yoon felt color was an element worth exploring. Capturing toddlers within a sea of their monochromatic possessions, these young girls and boys are portrayed within the context of how their world is colored.

“Pink was once a color associated with masculinity, considered to be a watered down red and held the power associated with that color.” Yoon continues, “The change to pink for girls and blue for boys happened in America and elsewhere only after World War II.” Her studies show that political correctness and gender equality issues reversed the gender color associations to pink for girls and blue for boys. “Today, with the effects of advertising on consumer preferences, these color customs are a worldwide standard.”

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