Tag: New York

Art

Museum of Modern Art stands up against the travel ban by featuring works by artists from Muslim-majority countries

We've all heard the news. New President Donald Trump has ordered a travel ban for people (even legal US citizens) who come from Muslim-majority countries. While this is happening, massive disagreement is taking place, and MoMA is doing a silent protest in its own way. The Museum of Modern Art in NYC (merely two blocks from Manhattan's Trump Tower) changed its usual displays overnight. Now, it features and highlights works created by artists who came from Muslim-majority nations, specifically those affected by the ban. On February 2, seven art pieces were installed on the fifth floor. Next to Iraninan artist Siah Armajani's sculpture, an accompanying wall text makes it clear where they stand. The text reads: "This work is by an artist from a nation whose citizens are being denied entry into the United States, according to a presidential executive order issued on Jan. 27, 2017. This is one of several such artworks from the Museum’s collection installed throughout...
Art

New gallery opens in Rhinebeck, gives the art community a new chance to come together and connect

The [email protected] new destination for art lovers and aficionados. Technically, it is a non-profit organization and will be available for members who have registered. On a larger scale, the gallery will serve as an economic platform to help boost the community's tourism, while adding more opportunities for business and employment for the locals. It also is a chance for weekenders to get outside, enjoy some art, and come together and connect as a community. The Gallery will feature various types of art - installations, sculptures, and paintings hung on walls. On top of this, it will also serve as a home for many other forms of art, such as spoken word, theatric plays, poetry slams, and poetry readings. Live jazz and classical music performances will also frequent the new venue, giving musicians and songwriters a new hub to flourish their talent. There will also be fashion shows, fundraisers, and other events that will benefit Rhinebeck in many ways. See some of...
Art

The role of Art Deco in fashion and textile designs over the years

During its conception, Art Deco was the newest style of its kind while boasting of strong attachments to other art styles and periods. It nurtured elements but at the same time reacted and even turned away from others. It gets a lot of similarities from its predecessor, Art Nouveau, such as geometric forms, exotic elements, as well as multiple dimensions and perspectives. During the Art Deco period, a lot of attention was given to textile design. At the time, fashion was the second biggest industry in export and carried heavy importance in the recovering economies right after WWI. Furthermore, Art Deco associates the technological innovations of the machine age, carrying with it a tendency to lean towards the urban and industrial scenes, which are prevalent in the metallic color palettes and the clean ergonomic lines of vehicles and objects. All of these were seen clearly in the evolution of textile and fashion design. The images below show the evolution of Art Deco design....
Art

‘Creepers’ exhibit shows colorful, tasteful perversity

Daniel Boccato's Creepers exhibition at The Journal Gallery in Brooklyn is underway. The exhibit is made of six fiberglass and epoxy sculptures. Each piece was made this year. The Brazilian native adopted a bold move by using a modern color-and-shape focus on his works. The exhibit is an impressive installment. You would expect such sculptures to have a strong psychological impact, but they seem too strategically done to make there be anything too weird about them. This may be work that is conservative in its core, showing that Boccato is simply a young artist that is full of promise and ambition. In a field that's teeming with similar artists, it will be nice to see how he fares against fellow sculptors. The show is considerably successful, thanks to its staying power. The installment features monochrome sculptures that refer to exterior anatomies. Some may appear abstract, even if motivated by natural or mechanical forms. Parallel to the wall, the pieces protrude...
Art

Artist inspired by Gustav Klimt designs fabulous foil print of NYC

New York has been imagined in numerous works of art. Rafael Esquer's take is one for the galleries. The designer from Alfalfa, New York was inspired by artworks from Austrian symbolist painter Gustav Klimt to create this gorgeous print of New York City. The piece is titled, "Iconic New York Illuminated" and incorporates over 600 iconic destinations around the city depicted in gold and silver foils and metallic inks. The cluttered nature of the print is the part of the piece's charm. Check it out below! A limited edition print is also available for purchase in their shop. ...
Art

Hilarious prank misleads NYC tourists into believing giant octopus attack

Historic events are often memorialized at famous landmarks with descriptive plaques in locations frequented by tourists. The Staten Island Ferry Disaster Memorial recently had a new plaque installed and it's pure trickery. The monument is located in Battery Park, Manhattan, and was created by artist Joe Reginella to honor the 400 people whose lives were taken when a giant octopus attacked a Staten Island ferry named "Cornelius G. Kolff." The event is said to have occurred on November 22nd, 1963, the day of the assassination of United States President, JFK. The hoax was part of Reginella's multimedia project and took six months to plan. Check out some images of the monument below and learn more about the event that never took place on Facebook. ...
Photography

The legs of New York

As the photo series Humans of New York has grown in popularity, Stacey Baker has taken a different approach to documenting the city and its diverse population. In a photo series that she calls Citi Legs, Barker has amassed more than 78,000 Instagram followers as she documents the women’s legs of her city. Barker, who is also a photo editor at the New York Times Magazine, will be releasing a hardcover book called New York Legs that will include a selection of her waist-down photos of strangers posed in front of a wall. Barker said in an interview, “I get the most likes on the sexiest pictures, the sexiest legs. I don’t personally think that those are the most interesting pictures — in fact, I think the pictures of legs that have more curves are far more interesting as pictures.” ...
Photography

Central Park looks like an alien planet when viewed through infrared lens

Photographer and graphic designer Paolo Pettigiani used an infrared lens to take several amazing shots of the New York City skyline. The vivid green grass you’d expect to see is transformed into lush foliage of reddish and pinkish hues. This couples with an indigo-hued sky to create a seemingly extraterrestrial landscape. The photographer, originally from Turin, Italy, moved to NYC just two weeks ago and has already filled his Instagram with fantastic views of the city as seen through an infrared lens. ...
Street art

50-ft tall mural in New York helps you work better with 10 helpful tips

If you’re looking for ways to make work more effective, look no further than this massive mural at the intersection of New York’s Houston and Mott Streets. As part of a collaboration between the Public Art Fund, Fischli, and Guggenheim curators Nancy Spector and Nat Trotman, the 50-foot-tall mural was produced to tag along with the Guggenheim’s exhibition “Peter Fischli and David Weiss: How to Work Better”. The mural lists 10 ways to make work better and serves as a reminder to slow down and take things one step at a time. The public art is an adaptation of a similar list discovered in a ceramics factory in Thailand about 30 years ago. Check out the ready-made work below, and click here to learn more. ...
Painting

Striking oil-based cityscape paintings capture low-lit moments

Cityscapes can be captured in a multitude of different ways. Jeremy Mann, for example, gives his work a unique flair with oil paints. His oil-based paintings capture city life in low-lit moments of the day such as early morning and during sunset hours. This specific time frame allows for some intriguing, Blade Runner-esque color palettes. Throughout the process, Mann is constantly applying and wiping away areas of the canvas to get that hazy look with layers of paint smeared to create objects off in the distance. Check out some of his cityscapes below, and follow Mann on Instagram and Facebook for more! ...
Video

Stunning CGI time-lapse of NYC getting invaded by plant life

If you’ve ever wondered what kind of damage too much greenery can do to a place, look no further than this stunning short film. Titled “Wrapped”, the animated short is the brainchild of directors Roman Kaelin, Falko Paeper and Florian Wittmann and depicts overgrowing plants gradually invading the dense skyline of New York City. Blending real-life footage with CGI, Wrapped makes for an awe-inspiring time-lapse and a scary one at that. Watch the short below, and learn more here. ...
Photography

Impressionist painting-like photo captured during the Jonas Winter Storm

The Jonas Winter Storm astounded civilians and scientists alike, while sweeping across the East Coast. Photographer Michele Palazzo was on the spot to capture it all. The photographer captured many shots on the morning of the blizzard, January 23rd, but this one picture is receiving high praise for its resemblance to a contemporary impressionist painting. The incredible shot features the Flatiron Building with a plethora of swirling snow in the backdrop and a perfectly-positioned food truck. EyeEm has compiled a great collection of Palazzo’s other shots here. Check them out! ...
Art

Bold collages made from vintage folders and notepads

Augustine Kofie puts a whole new shine on the word repurposing with his retro collages. The Los Angeles-based artist creates the collages using file folder, index cards, and steno notepads that date as back as the ’50s. He happened upon most of the while scavenging estate sale offices in Los Angeles. Each piece is fuelled by his obsession with physical forms of organization before the dawn of the digital age. Kofie’s latest collages are going to be on display at the Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York from Nov. 21st through Dec. 19th 2015 so if you’re in the area, check it out! ...
Sculpture

Life-size hydrostone sculptures perfectly capture human gestures

Daniel Arsham’s figural sculptures are changing the way artists use hydrostone in combination with glass. The New York-based artist’s portfolio spans a unique variation of life-size human sculptures and  inanimate objects like boom boxes and video game controllers. Using hydrostone and pieces of broken glass, Arsham creates expressive and dynamic forms like hands folded in prayer or grasping a basketball. The neutral color palette of his sculptures add to each piece’s decaying effect. Check out some of Arkham’s sculptures below, and visit his collaborative studio website: Snarkitecture. ...
Architecture

Florist turns crumbling old building into a “Flower House”

Flowers deserve a home too and florist Lisa Waud has given them one. After purchasing an abandoned house at a public auction in Detroit, Waud acted on a vision and invited talented florists from Michigan, Ohio, New York and Canada to turn the house into an art installation. With over 36,000 flowers currently residing on the property, the crumbling, old building is now called, Flower House and is open to the public. It took nearly a year of planning and the total estimated cost of all the plants used is about $150,000. Luckily, upon hearing of Waud’s plan, flower suppliers California Cut Flower Commission, Mayesh, and Nordlie offered to donate some of their flowers. Check out Flower House below and learn more about Waud’s work here! ...
Sculpture

Water-inspired steel sculptures make dramatic splashes

The elements can inspire some very beautiful works of art. A great example is this new collection of sculptures by Zheng Lu. The Chinese artist takes inspiration from water, its versatile nature and ability to form organic shapes, and the art of Chinese calligraphy which he grew up learning as a child. Lu’s large sculptures are made from stainless steel and feature wave-like formations that defy the very laws of physics. A plaster base is gradually subjected to numerous laser-cut Chinese characters; and the final piece is capable of standing freely on the floor, or suspended in air. The water sculptures are currently being exhibited at the Sundram Tagore Gallery in New York. Check out some cool photographs of them below, and visit his Artsy website for more. ...
Architecture

Beautiful vertical panoramas of church interiors make heads spin

Horizontal panoramas are making great headway in landscape photography but Richard Silver is having none of that. Instead, the New York born and bred photographer is busy taking eye-boggling vertical panoramas of beautiful church interiors. Each panorama is made up of 6 to 10 vertical shots stitched together. As someone who has visited hundreds of churches, Silver comments, “Finding the perfect location in the center aisle then shooting vertically from the pew to the back of the church gives the perspective that only architecture of this style can portray.” Check out some of the vertigo-inducing panoramas below, and visit Silver’s website for more. ...
Photography

Photographer captures the dark and quiet side of New York City

There’s something genuinely ominous about nightlife in Chinatown in Franck Bohbot’s new photographs. Simply titled “Chinatown”, the series captures New York’s public spaces when the sun goes down. Architecture sites, dark corners, dimly lit alleyways, and empty sidewalks all make appearances in the series, as Bohbot explores the rather quiet and absent side of the city that never sleeps. Check out the series below and click here for Bohbot’s complete portfolio of stunning street scenes. ...
Sculpture

Sculptor explores decline and decay of suburban Detroit

One person’s trash is certainly another person's treasure. Or in this case, an artist’s sculpture. Sandra Osip is a Brooklyn-based artist with a liking for creating sculptures and installations with deep meanings. This time she's tackling the decline and decay of suburban Detroit in her series called, “Broken Dreams”. The sculptures are of piled up houses reminiscent of the ones she came across as a child roaming the streets. Osip, citing nostalgia and her childhood as inspiration says, “this is now an empty wasteland and overgrown by nature. The day after my visit the news reported that a block away from where I lived they found two decomposing bodies.” Check out some of the sculptures below and visit her website for more “Broken Dreams”. ...
Painting

Life in space depicted in exceptional paintings

If you love all things NASA and space, then this series of exceptionally-painted scenes depicting life in space is for you! Michael Kagen is a New York-based artist drawn to the appreciation of man-made objects. His latest exhibition, Thunder in the Distance, combine his deep interest in outer space with his bold and steady strokes to paint impressive large scale paintings that pull the audience in with his unique impasto touch. He describes his rather philosophical approach to painting the series saying, “The painting is finished when it can fall apart and come back together depending on how it is read and the closeness to the work.” ...
Street art

Inspiring murals take over the streets of Rochester, New York

Art therapy has been a very effective tool for treating mental health patients worldwide. But how can art be used to assert positive influence over entire communities? The answer is WALL/THERAPY. WALL/THERAPY is slowly becoming a cultural phenomenon as it continues into its fifth year, transforming the streets of Rochester, New York with surreal, awe-inspiring murals and graffiti. Designed to inspire and intervene between communities, this year about 14 murals were unveiled. Featuring everything from gigantic superheroes to whale-shaped bubbles, each mural is located in a different area, sporting a different scale. Check out some of the amazing murals below, and click here for more programs associated with WALL/THERAPY. ...
Art

Colorful digital quilts with dazzling complexity

Andy Gilmore is a New York-based artist making dazzlingly complex digital compositions. His work looks like Digital Age quilts with colors, shapes, and patterns that would be far too complex to stitch by hand. They resemble a variety of sources including 1980s graphic design, optical illusions, and kaleidoscope visions. More than just the tumblr community has taken notice of his spectacular artwork, he has done projects for Ogilvy NY, Wired, and The New York Times among others. Follow Gilmore’s works in process and experimental compositions on his tumblr. ...
Street art

Saturated color mural adds shocking style to New York apartments

Manhattan Park, an apartment development on Roosevelt Island, NY, got a temporary facelift courtesy of yarn artist Hot Tea. The project was commissioned by Design firms K&Co and Pliskin Architecture to brighten up the pool deck of the new apartments. The artist painted the deck with shockingly saturated warm colors, reminiscent of the setting sun. “This piece is inspired by my color field installations that take up both private and public spaces,” Hot Tea told Brooklyn Street Art. “I love introducing color to spaces that seem neglected or forgotten. …I entitled this piece “Asylum” because the act of creating it pushed my mental and physical endurance so far that I wasn’t sure I could complete the task. When people experience my installations I hope that they will remember the experience far after the moment is gone. My goal for people who are viewing my work is to evoke subconscious feelings one may have forgotten.” ...
Photography

Photo series features the powerful hands of NYC shoe shiners

For his new series Christopher Griffith focused on an unlikely subject, the experienced hands of New York City’s shoe shiners. The series titled ‘Foot Soldiers’ shows the weathered skin, the used rags, and the tired muscles of the people still working at a profession that once flourished in the streets of New York and Chicago. "Different shiners had completely different techniques," he told the New York Times. "There’s water techniques, there’s dry techniques, different textures of the fabric. But all shoe shiners have one thing in common: the rag, the most disposable and yet the most indispensable tool of their trade. A long strip of fabric that gets twisted around fingers and then back over the flat of the hand, the rag works the polish into the deepest cracks, then buffs it till it gleams." The hard-working mentality that these images highlight transcends the shoe shining trade to relate to all individuals who work hard every day to earn their living. You...
Art

Hovering colored liquid captured against a vast landscape

Liquid photographed in mid-air is a popular internet sensation, but Jeremy Floto and Cassandra Warner of New York-based photography studio Floto+Warner have done a stand-out job on their recent series. Titled ‘Colourant’ the series combines vivid colors, solid-looking forms, and vast landscapes. The photos reference, candy and pop culture products and create a suspended disbelief that it is not liquid at all, but hovering solid forms. The images are created by throwing environmentally friendly water mixtures in onto the air and are published as-is , with no Photoshop used. ...
Photography

Raw street photography shows New Yorkers extremely up close

Canadian educator, writer and photographer Michael Ernest Sweet has a special way of seeing people that he translates into his unique street shots. Working mostly on the streets of New York City and Coney Island beaches, he's never afraid of invading his subjects' personal space and bringing his lens extremely close to the people whose faces and body fragments capture his interest. Sweet's photography style could not be mistaken with anyone else's. He's rather intolerant of safe zooms, choosing to bring himself only inches from his subjects instead. His photos are also known for their unconventional framing, cropping off less important parts of the subjects' bodies, be it their eyes or even their entire heads. Sweet's portraits work beautifully as some kind of shock therapy, forcing the viewer to see a lot more than one may expect. Visit Sweet's personal website to see more of his daring works. ...
Graphic Design

Early Macintosh icon pixel drawings acquired my MoMA

Susan Kare began sketching icons in the early 1980s for Macintosh computer, not knowing that she was at the forefront of an icon-language era. In the '90s her 'Happy Mac' greeted Macintosh users everywhere and many of her designs are still in use today. The MoMA recently acquired some of Kare's early drawings on display in their exhibition ‘This Is for Everyone.’ MoMA's blog explains Kare's process: “Using one box to equal one pixel, Kare designed intuitive icons for various functions a computer user might undertake (for example, a pair of scissors symbolized cutting text). The pictogram icons were designed to be an instinctive language that could be understood and loved by users in many different countries.” This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good continues at the Museum of Modern Art in New York through January 31, 2016. ...
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