Tag: Furniture

Creativity

Company designs a stylish way to have more privacy when sleeping

You don’t have to go camping to sleep in a tent anymore. American company Privacy Pop has invented a privacy bed tent which you can install in your bedroom or anywhere you would love to sleep isolated and safe from the scary insects. That’s right. For this purpose, Privacy Pop has created a Bug Tent too. Privacy bed tent could be also a dream bed for those who want to isolate themselves in a shared room. Hiding from your roommates was never easier. Check this out. ...
Art

Remembering the defunct ‘Faux Museum’: a paradise for oddities and confusion

The Faux Museum was once the bread and butter of Tom Richards, its curator (and often, janitor). It was located in Portland, Oregon and contains a wild collection of knick knacks. Everything inside the museum was either created by Richards himself or his friends. Each displayed item is a representation of his eccentric imagination and sense of humor. Why the weirdness? He simply wants people to "not think too hard" and "see things differently". In this light, each piece is misleading by intention. In fact, the original plan was to make an entire museum as a prank, but Richards ended up pouring everything he had into it. As a result, he made tourists and locals amused (and usually, confused) as they pass by. There certainly is a big hole left by the Faux Museum as it leaves us in its wake. It said goodbye in 2015, and fans from all over are still hoping that it'll open its doors once again - in one way or another.  ...
Furniture

Designer sculpts trees into chair-like objects without chopping them down

The fascinating thing about nature is that there's no stopping its growth. Gavin Munro is taking advantage of that with his unique furniture. The Derbyshire-based furniture designer fashions trees into chairs through some strategic sculpting. Yes, it's possible and Munro has years of testing in his mother's garden to prove it. Full Grown is the art of sculpting wood, as it grows, into furniture-like shapes without the need for chopping 'em down. The process can take anywhere between four to eight years as Munro describes, "In essence, it’s an incredibly simple art. You start by training and pruning young tree branches as they grow over specially made firmer. At certain points we then graft them together so that the object grows into one solid piece – I’m interested in the way that this is like an organic 3D printing that uses air, soil, and sunshine as its source materials." Check out some of the furniture below and learn more on their website. There's also...
Design

Acrylic and wooden fuse to make a furniture vanishing act

Furniture that dissipates into nothing right before your eyes is a comfortable optical illusion. The cleverly-titled project, "My Old New Chair," by visual artist Tatiane Freitas is all about repairing broken furniture and replacing the missing parts with translucent acrylic ones. Inspired by the Japanese practice of kintsugi, Frietas' designs put back functionality into the chairs and, at the same time, acknowledge the history of each piece, putting back the missing pieces. Check out some of her furniture below and find more of her latest work on her website and Instagram. ...
Architecture

Retro glamour in Leo’s Oyster bar

Leo’s Oyster bar is a relatively new hot spot in San Francisco. It “smells” retro with the botanical wallpaper, black and white tiles and floral decoration all around the place. The designer of the restaurant is San Francisco-based designer Ken Fulk. “Quintessentially masculine space that introduces tension with feminine qualities,” says Fulk for the midcentury dining room. Owners of this place Anna Weinberg and James Nicholas have created definitely a unique experience for their customers. For more information about the restaurant, its history, and the menu, check out their website here. ...
Design

Globe Garden chair inspired by our tree-dwelling ancestors

Globe Garden chair is 1.7 meters high and was created 29 years ago by Norwegian industrial designer Peter Opsvic. The purpose of this impressive chair is explained through the idea of active sitting. When the chair was designed back in 1985 its intention was to break stereotypical norms of sitting which are usually harmful to our spine and back. The new version of the chair looks like a tree with roots and a treetop. All these elements support the upper body and leave more space for moving. The first designed Globe Garden chair was more suitable for the public places. New versions are more adapted to the everyday situations at home or work.  If you want to order one just for you, check this website. ...
Creativity

Amazing modular bookshelf transforms to fit nearly any purpose.

A bookshelf that can be reconfigured? Take my money! If you find yourself often moving around your furniture only to get stumped by that one shelf in the corner, this fold-up bookshelf by Laurindo Marta for WeWood might interest you. The shelf, called, X2 Bookshelf, is crafted out of 100% solid oak and features a modular design that allows its user to customize its shape and size any way they want thanks to 48 wooden slats that work together. Check out the shelf in action below and click here to learn more. ...
Art

Outherworldly sand sculptures created with rolling metal balls

What if the tools  used to make sculptures could be incorporated into the piece itself?Artist Bruce Shapiro has done just that in a form of sculpture-inception. Using CNC machines, Shapiro has produced tables that make elegant patterns in layers of sand. At the center of each kinetic sculpture, cleverly named "Sisyphus," are metal balls that move in unique routes through each table's sand. Shapiro has been creating similar sculptures for over 20 years now with works being featured across Switzerland, Germany, and Australia. He recently launched a Kickstarter to help fund the production of three smaller tables: an end table, a coffee table, and a hardwood coffee table. Check out the tables in action below and learn more on his website. ...
Design

New series of furniture by Martyn Thompson inspired by the Ionian Sea

This year's London Design Week yielded loads of fabulous exhibits. However, the exhibit by the Martyn Thompson Studio probably stood out the most! The studio unveiled a new collection of abstract textiles via a pop-up shop during the event. The patterns are reminiscent of previous works by Thompson. The oceanic patterns used in the fabrics were inspired by Thompson’s photographs of the Ionian Sea. The patterns are woven in 100% cotton on a jacquard loom. Thompson says he incorporates fantastic imagery into his everyday work. Check out some of the furniture below and learn more on their website. ...
Design

You can actually sit on these 2D chairs

Ever wish you could pull 2D objects from a wall and use them? Korean designer Jongha Choi makes that possible. Our perception of two-dimensional images are challenged when watching Choi turn one of his 2D chairs, suspended on a wall, into a 3D object that you can actually sit on. The designs were conceptualized as part of his thesis at Eindhoven Design Academy in The Netherlands as part of a collection titled, De-Dimension. Watch the video below, and head on over to his website to learn more. ...
Furniture

Furniture designer is influenced by Japan and Scandinavia

In a three-legged rocking chair design called Nobu, Danish furniture designer Rasmus Warberg uses a curved foot to create stability. The bent steel frame is mirrored with the chair seat’s circular curves and rounded backrest. Made from steel tube, ash wood, and leather, the design shows simplicity, precision, and airiness. Having studied design in both Japan and Scandinavia, his Copenhagen-based studio strives to create furniture that is unique in its visual aesthetic while pulling from the craftsman and design traditions of the two countries. ...
Industrial design

This funky tabletop has wooden rockets and puffy clouds for legs

Rockets and tables don’t usually come together perfectly, but Stelios Mousarris has found a fun way to pull it off. The Cypriot-based designer came up with this neat idea of a glass tabletop suspended by five wooden rockets blasting off into space. The furniture was inspired by Mousarris’ own childhood toy collection. The designer tried to retain a retro and cartoon-like aesthetic for the clouds holding the rockets up. The fabrication of the piece combines a variety of processes including 3D printing and lathe work. The tables are currently available for preorder on Mousarris’ website! ...
Design

Stop-motion film tells of a furniture-maker’s ancient processes

Furniture maker Jim Tolpin was turned into an animated character in the stop-motion short film by Andrea Love. Tolpin, who is the author of the book By Hand & Eye and a faculty member at the Port Townsend School of Woodworking, explains design principles that predate industrialized concepts and were used by 17th and 18th century craftsmen. The charming video explains the premise of Tolpin’s concepts that measurements such as inches, feet, or meters are not necessary to create good designs. Instead, the focus should be on proportions: “The notion of well-proportioned is ingrained in the human eye and is rooted in the different elements of the piece of furniture having whole number proportions (like 1:3 or 3:5),” he says. ...
Design

From 2D to 3D: wall-hanging becomes furniture

Easily transforming from 2D to 3D these furniture pieces can go from being wall art to a sitting stool. The work is part of Jongha Choi’s 2015 Master’s thesis in Contextual Design at the Design Academy Eindhoven in the Netherlands. The designer’s interest in the transformation between two dimensions and three dimensions is conceptually rooted in a childhood problem with his eyesight and his difficulty judging distances. As these flat-stored pieces transform into a functional stool, it seems to be a trick of the eye. Watching the transformation in the video below, you cane see why this smartly designed solution is a practical product for small spaces. ...
Design

Zen bamboo furniture inspired by nature

This furniture pieces rises from a single flat piece of bamboo wood. No assembling whatsoever required, no tools needed, no skills to put them together. The designer Robert Van Embricqs has inspired in nature to made the most intricate designed to create the most minimalist furniture. It takes mere seconds to fold the bamboo sheet and the strategically placed hinges take care of everything. Can’t imagine a more friendly furniture when you’re moving. See more of his work check his website, or following him on his Facebook,  Twitter, YouTube, and INK361. ...
Design

7 sculptural chairs by Peter Shire

Los Angeles-based sculptor and furniture maker Peter Shire was one of the original members of the Milan-based Memphis Group which is known for its postmodernist designs of bold colors and shapes. Shire’s sculptural furniture pieces show a playfulness with shape and structure. While Shire’s work has been exhibited internationally and is held in many museum collections, the below chair designs have the whimsy of an imaginary world, as though they would be part of the set design of a child’s dream sequence. In an interview with Juztapoz Magazine, Shire explained why he likes messing with the line between art and function: “Fun. We’re Californians, we’re baby boomers, we’re in for fun, absurdity, exhilaration, and intoxication…” ...
Design

Furniture design firm uses 737 engine for elegant, shiny chair

What do you do with a scrapped commercial airliner? Repurpose its parts and use them to make shiny, elegant furniture. Fallen Furniture designed this brilliant chrome-y chair called the “737 Cowling Chair”, using a real Boeing 737 engine cowling. Sitting on top of a spun aluminum base, the chair is oriented as it would be on an airplane and measures nearly 6.5’ square. This isn’t he first time that the furniture company has used an airplane part because they specialize in “making functional objects from “reclaimed, authentic aircraft parts, from both military and civilian aircraft”. How's that for originality? Check out the cowling chair below, and find more work on their website and on Facebook. ...
Furniture

Furniture from a single piece of wood

Robert Van Embricqs is the designer behind a new type of furniture where a table, chair, or bowl, unfolds from a single piece of wood. The furniture is made of woven bamboo beams. Robert’s design won a Reddot Design Award and has received a lot of attention. Check out the video and photos below to see how the furniture rises out a single piece of bamboo. ...
Design

Exquisite new sea-inspired tables by Alexandre Chaplin

We’ve covered Alexandre Chaplin’s wonderful tables before and now he's at it again with a set of new one that are equally stunning. The new tables are also part of his Lagoon series, in which the tables appear as though they are sliced chunks of the ocean complete with sea bed and shoreline. His latest is the Lagoon 55, a coffee table version of the original LA Table that we covered previously, inspired by the Caribbean island of Saint Martin. Multiple layers of resin and marble make up the table, with varying formulas at each level to add depth. Due to the tables being handcrafted, each piece is unique. Check out the new tables below, and see more of Chapelin's work on his website ...
Furniture

Innovations in relaxation

If a hammock and a rocking chair had a love affair, the offspring would be this new piece of furniture by students at the Pune, India-based MIT Institute of Design. This hammock-rocking-chair hybrid was made in just two weeks during a class. Students Harshita Murudkar, Shivani Gulati, and Mehak Philip worked collaboratively to conceptualize and build the piece. After welding the round metal frame, the trio then used three different weaving styles to make both the structure to sit upon and add decorative design elements. Combining the rocking motion of a rocking chair with the cradled sway of a hammock, this furniture mash-up is an interesting design solution. ...
Furniture

Roll-top table is perfect for small spaces

Tiny home owners are learning what many urban dwellers have known for a long time. When space is at a premium, your life can be made much easier by having furniture that can transform based on your needs. Swedish designer Nathalie Dackelid has created a table that she is calling “Wooden Cloth”. We have previously seen how artists use intricate joinery techniques to make wood resemble textiles, but in Dackelid’s table, she uses a triangular scoring technique that allows a flat surface to roll into a smaller shape. Combining elements of a roll-top desk with a table leaf, the piece made of ash wood presents a clean and contemporary design. ...
Furniture

Steel bench is fluidly sculpted

The design for this outdoor bench by French Designer Alexandre Moronnoz shows a form that bends and flows. Made from laser-cut and bent steel that has been soldered and powder-coated, the piece measures 78 centimeters long and has a heft of 450 kilos. Currently being sold by the Outdoorz Gallery, the piece has previously been exhibited at the Biennale Internationale Design St-Etienne in 2008 Calling it the “Muscle Project” the designer says, “Like the fibrous tendons of a muscle, its metal blades compress and stretch to maintain rigidity that is convivial and dynamic.” The linear repetition of the striated shape make gorgeous intersections between the top surface and the bottom support. In the below photos, see how the steel intersects and overlaps, creating a visual line drawing. ...
Funny

Kitschy, original pool table (yes, that’s a doughnut)

The design of some objects, such as a pool table, have been standardized. For the most part, one pool table look like every other pool table. After all, there are regulations to these things as determined by the game’s governing body, World Pool-Billiard Association. Yet for pool tables that do not use the approved dimensions for the game, this one takes the cake, (err, takes the doughnut?). With a pink frosting as the playing bed, the billiard balls are colorful sprinkles in two colors that allow for a two-player game. The doughnut-shaped pool table took designer Cléon Daniel eight weeks to build. His last pool table was shaped like a banana.  ...
Industrial design

Chilean designer uses fallen tree limbs to make elegant furniture

Rather than using freshly cut-down trees for his furniture, Sebastian Errazuriz has opted for fallen branches sourced from forests in South America. The Chilean artist and designer draws his furniture's form from the aesthetics of trees dictated by nature. The tree is the focal point in Errazuriz’s shelves and tables, followed by their simple and elegant designs with thin panes of glass placed for functionality. Check out some of his furniture below, and follow him on Facebook and Instagram for more! ...
Design

Elegant tables made to resemble Caribbean island of Saint Martin

Coffee tables are centerpieces of modern day living rooms so it makes sense that they be made to look fantastic. Designer Alexandre Chapelin of LA Table has designed three tables that are influenced by Chapelin’s time spent at the Caribbean island of Saint Martin. Appropriately titled “Lagoon Tables”, each table has a carved travertine base with a special resign holding it together while also giving the appearance of volumes of ever-deepening water. Check out the tables below, and click here to see more of Chapelin’s work. ...
Creativity

Toto designs really fancy toilets

For those enamored with luxury at every turn in their life, look no further than Toto. For those who are familiar with washlets, the products of Toto will be familiar, but for most Americans, Toto’s products may not be. For starters, this is a couture toilet company with the most innovative designs in toilets. The most recent models offer heated seats, a bidet function, an air-purifying system deodorizing in use, an air dryer, and the ability to raise and lower the lid. The Carlyle II 1G model is their most recent product geared towards Americans with a glaze on the seat that repels waste while also using only one gallon of water per flush. Want more? Other models, like the Neorest has a UV light to kill bacteria. All of their models can cost thousands of dollars. ...
Furniture

Chair design used autism research to design for comfort

Using a half-sphere form, a new chair design lets adults rock themselves to sleep. Richard Clarkson says that the goal in designing the Cradle Chair was to create a “safe, comfortable and relaxing environment in which the user can dissipate the over-stimulation of their senses.” The design team drew upon research of Autism and other disorders which cites the soothing qualities of rhythmic rocking. The chair is currently in production. It ships from New Zealand where it is handmade from local materials. Richard Clarkson Studio is based in Brooklyn, following Clarkson’s completion of the graduate program in product design at the School of Visual Arts in New York. ...
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