Tag: Fashion

Art

Fashion photographer takes cinematic images that embody melancholic symbolism

Fashion has worked side by side with photography to give the audience a complete experience visually. Artists like Elizaveta Porodina is one of those who brings success to these collaborations bringing the spectators to a whole new level of understanding of the art. Porodina was born in Moscow. In her experimental fashion and fine art photography, she travels through time and space, extracting the underlying emotions in her entrancing productions. She studied clinical Psychology and this could just be the biggest influence on her masterpieces. Her melancholic symbolism sets connotations, sometimes ambiguous, sometimes honest and obvious. Her imagery range widely varying between cinematic, fashion and almost documentary. This artist had a couple of exhibitions in 2016. She had worked with magazines like Vogue, Elle, among others. She also had collaborations with Louis Vuitton, BMW MINI, and others for commercials. More information about Porodina can...
Fashion

Korean visual artist creates psychedelic fashion-inspired art

Eunjong Yoo, a young Korean visual art graduate, started her artistic career working various fashion-related jobs before pursuing her real passion of illustrating. After completing her BFA illustration at The School of Visual Art in Korea, she went on to work as a fashion director where she would direct ad campaigns and create ideas and mock ups for visual branding as a graphic designer. Her art is heavily inspired by fashion which, according to her, is one of her work’s top inspirations. With the use of mixed media, her heavy, artistically sloppy lines and bold colors help her express her art and tell stories in a unique, creative way. She gets all the excitement from her environment, the cult fashion, the bustling scenes of the city, and even the simplicity of nature. According to Eunjong Yoo, she stays “intuitive, but analyzing is my second nature. In every project, I value the process of analytical studies for bringing the creative vision to life.” She currently...
Culture

Witness the WiFi revolution in Havana through these captivating photos

Cuba has got 35 WiFi hotspots and absolutely busy citizens. After many years of expensive wifi connection possibilities, Cuba opened free hotspots around the country and the pictures below will show you how this affected the happy citizens. Just a year ago, most tourists couldn’t easily connect to the internet; the service was expensive and terribly slow. Well, things are finally changing! Talented British documentary photographer Jason Larkin captured photo collections that show us the current mood of "the nation on the internet". Take a look. ...
Art

Havana hosts ‘Fashion Art’, becomes a destination for fashion lovers and art fans alike

Fashion Art Havana is the latest event in the Fashion Art series, spearheaded by Manuel Fernandez, a Spanish designer who has traveled the world and worked with more artists than he can count. His goal is to create one-off garments that meet at the crossroads of art and fashion. In an interview, he said that "art doesn't have to always be hung on walls, it could also be on floor tiles, earrings, tights or many other places." Adding to that, a participating artist, Jorge Perugorria, also said that "fashion is also art, and this is a concept we need to start understanding here." All of the artists that participated had very positive hopes for the event, and for the objective behind it. They pray that this will help the rest of the world see Cuba as a fashion destination and an art haven, not just a mere communist territory where consumerists and capitalists can indulge as they please. ...
Creativity

This photographer captures the unconventional beauty of the dark side

 Рина Драгунова (Rina Dragunova)  is a photographer from Saint-Petersburg, Russia. The compositions featured in front of her camera are very unusual. A subtle dance between the fantastical and the macabre, her pictures are gloomy, eerie, disturbing and provocative, but beautiful nontheless. To enjoy more of her work you can follow her on Facebook, or visit 500px.            ...
Art

Art Dad debuts in Fashion Week, showcases clothing that embodies responsible yet fun fatherhood

Gone are the days of the traditional dad. The dad who focuses on working during the day, watches the game at night, and gives a stern look to misbehaving kids. Now, we have Art Dad. What is Art Dad? “Art Dad is a reaction to everything being about ‘youth youth youth’. There’s something to be said for being responsible, having health care, taking care of business but still having fun.” This is how co-founder and collaborator Tremaine Emory explains the phenomenon. He says that Art Dad doesn't always have to be a dad. It's about embodying creativity, style, and a good fashion sense while harboring maturity beyond your years. At the OFF-WHITE Paris show, Art Dad opened with an oversized shearling coat, leopard print boiler suit, graphic tees and socks, and a whole lot more. You can learn more about Art Dad by following Emory on Instagram or checking out his ShowStudio profile. ...
Art

The role of Art Deco in fashion and textile designs over the years

During its conception, Art Deco was the newest style of its kind while boasting of strong attachments to other art styles and periods. It nurtured elements but at the same time reacted and even turned away from others. It gets a lot of similarities from its predecessor, Art Nouveau, such as geometric forms, exotic elements, as well as multiple dimensions and perspectives. During the Art Deco period, a lot of attention was given to textile design. At the time, fashion was the second biggest industry in export and carried heavy importance in the recovering economies right after WWI. Furthermore, Art Deco associates the technological innovations of the machine age, carrying with it a tendency to lean towards the urban and industrial scenes, which are prevalent in the metallic color palettes and the clean ergonomic lines of vehicles and objects. All of these were seen clearly in the evolution of textile and fashion design. The images below show the evolution of Art Deco design....
Art

Canadian fine jewelry brand focusing on fresh and contemporary designs for women

Mejuri is the brainchild of former engineer Noura Sakkijha and seasoned art director Justine Lançon. It is an e-commerce fine jewelry brand based in Canada which gives a whole new light on making personal jewelry decisions. The two founders are concentrating on making sure that all women are given a positive experience when shopping for jewelry, and that all of their items reflect their consumers' personality, needs, and goals in life. They create contemporary and minimalistic bracelets, earrings, rings, and necklaces, which are exclusively available online. This is to reduce unnecessary markups common in retail practice. The brand aims to be able to bring new and high-quality jewelry to women for their daily lives. This is made possible by constantly designing and creating new, fresh designs that are crafted by expert jewelers, which they offer to their consumer base at accessible prices. These factors make Mejuri stand out from the crowd. Check out some...
Art

Designer duo makes gender-fluidity a reality in fashion week debut

Over the past few years, we've seen Hollywood and big clothing brands try to capitalize on the current cultural relevance of being "gender neutral". While the sentiment may be good-hearted, it is a long way towards being genuinely authentic. Then, enter Art School - the brainchild of Eden Loweth and Tom Barratt, the design duo that's creating all the fuss in the fashion community. For these partners, queer identity is beyond just another trend. It is a reality. Their reality. It's not just about jumping aboard the bandwagon, but rather, about living their life in the real world. The duo made their debut for fashion week at Lulu Kennedy's Fashion East showcase. Art School was presented with a non-model cast, directed by Theo Adams (who also happens to be a performance artist). ART SCHOOL is an official presentation at this year's Fashion East Men’s Presentations AW17. ...
Art

Multimedia artist taps into the powerful effects of ‘Transformational Makeovers’

Erica Prince is a multimedia artist based in Brooklyn. She is the genius behind Transformational Makeovers, the product of exploring her real-life experiences of making over her friends. It all began as an honest, simple hobby. In the end, she began considering herself as a creator of inanimate images and objects. After a long time, she realized that make-up can become a BIG part of her art, especially when she saw how her friends acted and felt differently after she made them up. This reaction made her understand that this was something powerful. So, she started experimenting with different colors and materials on human flesh. She found herself lost in the psyches of the subjects, letting her find a clearer perspective on that very person. Prince clarifies that the process is "not about beauty" but instead, it is a project that acknowledges the humanity of the participant by letting their guards down and letting an artist make them her blank canvass. See more of her...
Creativity

Humans and Barbies – The evolution of an icon

Since the iconic Barbie doll was first released in 1959, she underwent various transformations. The doll actively lived the imaginary life according to the dominant picture of female beauty. As feminism got stronger with its practice of deconstructing the objectified images of female beauty, Barbie finally got her new looks. The new idea of creators is to “copy reality”. However, herein lies the confusion - are humans copying the dolls or dolls copying the humans? <iframe width="950" height="633" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vPETP7-UfuI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>...
Art

Creative duo pokes fun at painting outdoors with parodic series

Among the many hilarious ways out there that you use to make fun of traditional painting methods, this is by far the best one! Since 2009, Hank Schmidt in der Beek and Fabian Schubert have been delivering laughs through their parodic photography series called "Und im Sommer tu ich malen" (“And in the Summer I do Paint”). The series follow the duo poking fun at plein air painting. The two travel to locations that have inspired the works of painters like Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, and Vincent Van Gogh. Gazing at the beautiful scenery ahead, der Beek stands in front of his canvas with a paint brush, proudly imprinting the patterns of his attire. Check out some of the photos below and head on over to Edition Taube for more.    ...
Creativity

This hair of mine – a celebration of African hair styles

Hair is a symbol of strength, resistance, of ethnicity and womanhood. Cyndia Harvey, a London-based artist, gathered together with African women from the African Diaspora and researched their connection with African heritage and meaning of beauty. Cyndia moved to London when she was 11 years old and African culture and hairstyle were always an important part of her identity. The short video she made is a beautiful representation of various cultural flows and meanings it produces. Hairstyle fans and students of culture are going love this.    ...
Creativity

Elaborately-dressed bagworms dresses female consumer culture in Japan

Aki Inomata is tackling female consumer culture in Japan as part of her elaborate series in an odd and creative way! The artist dressed female bagworms with pieces of extravagant attire, designed to be protective cases of sorts. She purposely chose to use female bagworms because, unlike their masculine partners, they retain their protective cases for the entirety of their lives. The work was exhibited in Japan and serves as Inomata's commentary on what women go through to be accepted by society in terms of their looks. Check out some of her creative bagworm dresses below and find more on her website. ...
Creativity

Beautiful orb-like sculptures made from textiles from Mariko Kusumoto

Mariko Kusumoto has been turning textiles into orb-like sculptures for a while now (previously) and her creations never cease to amaze. The sculptures can be worn in the form of necklaces, brooches, and rings. Each artwork is inspired by patterns and shapes found in nature but Kusumoto has opted to retain some form of ambiguity here and there for the user's imagination. She writes in her artist statement, "My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made. I ‘reorganize’ them into a new presentation that can be described as surreal, amusing, graceful, or unexpected." Check out some of her new works below and find more on her website. ...
Creativity

Fashion tribes: more than hipsters

“The street is the theater of life” Daniel Tamagni is a freelance photographer and an identity explorer from Italy. Although a fashion oriented photographer, he finds his subjects outside in the wild streets of Africa, Cuba, Bolivia and Burma. He adopts a specific socio-anthropological perspective while looking through his lens. One of his latest project titled “Fashion tribes: Global street styles” represents an amazing insight into the exotic subculture groups of young people in the developing countries. The fashion styles these groups create is a mishmash of modern and traditional. They are mirroring the globalization and its heterogeneity. Hipsters, punks, hard metal rockers, everyone is there. For more photos click here. ...
Creativity

Spilled paint inspires unique clothing designs

If you're working in the studio, things are bound to get messy. Olya Glagoleva and Lisa Smirnova have used this as inspiration for their latest collaborative project. The duo have captured this messy look and given it an elegant spin. The clothing has been embroidered in Russian artist Smirnova's style, with patches of what appear to be accidental paint drips and doodles. The one-of-a-kind pieces turn the clothing into unique works of art with each piece taking nearly 100 hours to produce. Check out some of the outfits below and find more of Glagoleva’s designs with her line GO on her [email protected]_with_olya, and follow Smirnova [email protected]_smirnova. Find more from this collection on Behance. ...
Art

Bunnie Reiss transforms old leather gloves into funky works of art

Transforming old things into something new and fresh isn't easy. Bunnie Reiss has been a collector her whole life and knows this better than anyone. The artist has a knack for taking old things and making them into totally unexpected pieces of art that you'd want to own. She has an ongoing project that involves turning a collection of old leather gloves into artistic creations complete with symmetry and images to reflect its past, present, and what it might bring for the future. The gloves feature elegant  eyes, noses and ears to provide personality. Check out the funky little gloves below and find more of her works on her website and Instagram. ...
Creativity

Facial tattoos: the people behind the ink

Mark Leaver is a photographer with an amazingly curious eye for those known as “Others”. One of his latest projects called "Tattoos" personifies the mystery of body decoration in Britain’s facial tattoo community. "What is always interesting about tattoos in the European context is the reason behind it," says Leaver. "Sometimes is just a body decoration, the way people describe beauty or attractiveness. Sometimes is the way someone feels about a specific life occasion that they want to be forever remembered. Nevertheless, people often like to be seen as somebody else. Tattoos can make them appear like different but how they feel 'inside' is harder to reach." To see the rest of the project and more of Mark’s work check out his website....
Creativity

19th-century dress transformed into ghostly, crystalline sculpture by the Dead Sea

You’ve probably seen this making the rounds on Facebook, but this salt-infused dress is too fabulous to ignore. Israeli artist Sigalit Landau grew up near the Dead Sea, one of the saltiest bodies of water on Earth. She often uses the lake’s saline qualities to create sculptural objects fused with thick layers of salt. Her latest piece called "Salt Bride" follows suit. A 19th-century dress — inspired by S. Ansky’s famous play, The Dybbuk — was weighted to the floor of the Dead Sea until it crystallized. Check it out below and find out more about the exhibition on Artsy. ...
Creativity

Artist creates tiny screen printing rig for doll-size clothes

Devin Smith began working for a t-shirt factory in 2013 when inspiration struck. He now has one of the quirkiest hobbies around and it has now consumed five months of his free time. The miniature artist began building a tiny replica of his studio. The project ended as a gift for his employers and is now displayed in their showroom. Taking the tiny clothing idea even further, Devin designed a completely functional screen printing rig that can actually transfer designs to tiny clothes for dolls. Check out the video below to see it in action and find more of his miniature designs on Facebook. ...
Fashion

Unique patterned shirts imprinted using manhole covers and vents

You don’t really need professional shirt printing equipment to design and print your own t-shirts. All you need are manhole covers. Berlin-based Raubdruckerin (pirate printer) uses manhole covers, vents, and utility grates to imprint geometric patterns and typographic forms on shirts. The artist collective then sells their creations online via their shop. Check out the unique patterned shirts below, and head on over to their website for more. ...
Art

Children’s scribble and doodles converted into premium-quality jewelry

Those childish doodles are more artistic and fashionable than you ever thought thanks to Turkish jewelry company, Tasarım Takarım. The project was founded two years ago by artists Yasemin Erdin Tavukçu and Özgür Karavit, and converts children’s doodles into wearable jewelry. Turning a simple, often overlooked, doodle into a timepiece fascinated the two, sparking a venture that has lead to a number of premium necklaces and showpieces inspired by children’s works. Each piece is unique and handcrafted in order to replicate the scribbles. Check out some of the pieces below, and head on over to Instagram and Etsy to see more and pick a few up for yourself! ...
Fashion

Recreating traditional Ukrainian headdresses

Maysternya Treti Pivni (Ukr. Майстерня Треті Півні) is a collective of photographers, stylists, makeup artists, and promoters. In celebration of traditional Ukrainian culture, the group has staged photo shoots that recreate authentic, traditional attire of the country. The images show outstanding floral headdresses and crowns, exquisite embroidered textiles, collections of beaded jewelry, and the smiling faces of women who are celebrating their culture. The photos, while steeped in tradition, also feel fresh and contemporary. There is no artifice of old-fashioned; instead the photos show the traditional dress with vibrancy. ...
Fashion

Stain-resistant uniforms sourced from public transportation fabric

Despite their renowned discomfort, you shouldn’t take seats on public transportation for granted. German artist Menja Stevenson commutes a lot and from that she draws inspiration for her latest line of uniforms. The fabric used are sourced from the same colored, patterned seat covers found on buses. One great thing about the fabric is that it’s stain, resistant and made to counter spills. Plus, you can camouflage yourself perfectly with the seats when commuting. Puzzled by how some didn't outright notice the dress, Stevenson explained, “I couldn’t believe that many people didn’t realize the connection seeing me and the seats together. Did they think that it was sheer coincidence?” Check out some of the uniforms below, and find more on Stevenson’s website. ...
Creativity

Delicious designs made from fashionable foods

Fashion design on paper is not as spectacular as it is once you have the actual attire, with the fabric flowing in front of you. Edgar Artis is an Armenian fashion illustrator that completely changes that. His garment designs stand out and exploit the food natural colors, textures and patterns. To see more of his original delicious work, check his Instagram and Facebook. ...
Fashion

Vibrant wearable orb-like sculptures made from synthetic fabric

Mariko Kusumoto’s colorful balloons are made out of fabric and contain various objects symbolic of the artist’s lifestyle. The Japanese artist uses transparent fabric for the orb-like forms. Contained within these soft-shell balloons are objects ranging from smaller orbs to sea creatures, cars, and more. Applying heat to the pieces allows Kusumoto to shape the sculptures as she desires around the objects that are to be contained inside. The artist writes in her statement, “My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made.” Check out some of Kusumoto’s sculptures below, and find more on her Facebook. ...
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