Tag: Architecture

Architecture

Urban farming prototype Growroom appeared in Copenhagen’s 2016 Chart Art Fair

Growroom, an artistic project made to answer the demands of urban farming, was seen in Copenhagen’s 5th CHART ART FAIR held at the heart of the city. The art event, staged in central Charlottenborg, was established in 2013 with the concept of challenging “the boundaries and experience of a traditional art fair.” Designed by the collaborative community of Space10, Growroom is the first pocket farm of its kind to provide urban solutions for the growing problems of sustainability and demand for fresh produce. With “food producing architecture” in mind, lead architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum designed the spherical greenhouse to enable users to plant and harvest greens and herbs using the built-in plant boxes. It is transportable and compact in size that can transform it into both an artistic display and a food haven in one. Similar to all their other innovative projects, the “future-living lab and exhibition space” Space10’s main purpose...
Architecture

The 7th Room is a 33-foot tall treehouse in the Swedish woods

The 7th Room puts a whole new shine on the concept of tree houses. The structure is one of seven cabins available from northern Sweden’s Treehotel and offers a stunning view of the Aurora Borealis. The 7th Room was designed by architecture firm Snøhetta and features a base with black and white images of pine trees that give the illusion of reflection. The 33-foot tall cabin camouflages itself into the surrounding woods and floor-to-ceiling windows provide gorgeous views at all angles. Check it out below and find the other six cabins, like The Mirror Cube, on their website. ...
Architecture

London-based company gives chocolates very impressive packaging inspired by actual architecture

Beau Cacao is a one-of-a-kind chocolate company. While most chocolate bars come modestly-wrapped with paper or plastic, with the logo of the brand and simple grooves and cuts, this London-based company looks way beyond all that austerity. Founded back in 2013, the company stands out high and proud from the crowd without breaking a sweat. As you can see in the photos below, the chocolate's packaging requires an intricate design and is unlike most others. This is thanks to Adam Gill, the American designer commissioned to work with the company. Here he creates highly graphic designs, where the chocolate square is not merely a chocolate square. We are also reminded of the Malaysian origins of the cacao beans that are used in creating these treats. With an added dash of modern design and an overall inspired work, taking hints from the country's architecture, the outcome is truly marvelous. ...
Architecture

Industrial shipping container shelter that serves as an all-inclusive modern escape

In a busy generation that synonymizes traveling with the most sought-after luxury retreats, people often forget that nature is in itself an escape. With the use of steel and nature as the frame, Danish bathroom and kitchen company VIPP created a capsule-like shelter that packs all the essentials for a modern retreat. The 55 square meter pre-fabricated shelter is structurally supported with steel and is composed of two levels. The ground floor, which is covered with glass windows on two sides, boasts the bedroom, the kitchen, family room and the bathroom. The upper level has a small storage unit with a loft-type sleeping space for another guest. Nature plays a major role in the shelter’s sustainability. The operable windows are designed to allow natural circulation of air and the black-colored exterior absorbs heat and sunlight when it is hot. A built-in fireplace is also strategically positioned at the center of the shelter to equally distribute heat. The 25-ton...
Architecture

Architect submits designs to convert turn of the century industrial area into eco-village

Vincent Callebaut decided to transform historic Tour & Taxis in Brussels, the complex that was built in 1900 but has now sat for decades and has lost its purpose. Firm Vincent Callebaut Architects have a futuristic but real vision of redesigning this place, imagined with new, ecological standards. Working or living in such a place looks like a paradise. This project proposal is ambitious but would be a great step for the future of architecture and would give courage for further green architecture projects. ...
Books

Where else could you get more inspired than in Mark Twain’s library?

Mark Twain House & Museum has recently announced their plan to share Mark Twain’s working environment with contemporary writers of literature the world over. According to their plan, visitors will be allowed to work in the 19th-century house where characters such as Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn were born. However, next year's visitors will have more competition, as only 4 sessions will be organized. All of those who want this inspirational journey had better hurry up and reserve their ticket on time. For more information visit the museum’s website. ...
Architecture

Poho series shows Brutalism style depicted in architecture around the world

Many of these gray giants were built between 1950 und 1970s. This type of architecture is known as Brutalism and was mostly popular in post-war Europe, India, and the Eastern Bloc. Today, many of these buildings are demolished and lie in ruins. However, many are empty and exist as monuments to a bygone era. The monuments constructed in this style are especially interesting in ex-Yugoslavia countries. Brutalism was typically represented in buildings without paint or dressings. In many, they evoke silence, glory, and fear. They definitely stand as the last bastions of an architectural style that reigned during a challenging era for Europe. ...
Art

British East India Company School of Painting’s artworks on display at The Met once again

History tells us that the British East India Company influenced the world in terms of diplomacy and governance, but many of its officers and their families were also great purveyors and supporters of the arts. Soon enough, the Company School of Painting came to be, creating art during the 18th and 19th centuries. Their art was distinguishable because of the patrons' influences: their love for European trends, for science and discovery. The artists even trained in late-Mughal painting techniques. You can see the evolution of their methods into flora, fauna, landscape, and people. Other styles include picturesque landscape views and architecture. The works from the school and its era is on display at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 464, entitled "Company School Painting in India (ca. 1770–1850)" from April 10 to October 1, 2017. (This same exhibit was also on display last September 2016.) For more information, visit the official The Met website. ...
Architecture

Stunning photos show six picturesque, must-visit small town destinations in France

France is a common tourist destination all year long, especially with favorites such as Nice, Paris, and Marseille. However, there is much to be seen and experienced from its lesser known, but equally captivating, smaller town counterparts. Here is a list that you should include on your travel list this 2017. (1) Chamonix - a ski village that is captivating during winter with an adorable market on Christmas season. During the summer, it is an excellent hiking and biking setting with tantalizing views of the mountains. (2) Colmar - home to Renaissance architecture, with medieval homes and cobblestone streets. (3) Amiens - now a UNESCO World Heritage site, it will lure in tourists with its warm belfry ambiance. (4) Lourmarin - a beautiful village that comes alive during summertime, thanks to many boutiques, terraced cafes, and restaurants beyond your wildest dreams. (5) Èze - found near Nice, this historic hilltop has the best medieval architecture, botanical gardens,...
Architecture

A novel way of displaying art: hanging frames on bookcases and (virtually) any flat surface

Say goodbye to minimalism. The new year comes in with a bang when it comes to interior design and architecture. It seems that simply hanging paintings on your wall is too passé these days. The shift began towards the end of 2016 and is carried on to the dawn of 2017. The trend that would make you think it came only from hipsters and wannabe designers is actually making a statement in the design world. Thanks to underground indie photographers and illustrators, we are now acknowledging the fact that any and all flat surfaces are acceptable venues for displaying art. So if you've got bookshelves or even an entire library in your home, hanging framed paintings, landscapes, or even your own portraits on the shelves' partitions might actually mean that you're on your way to modern creativity. What once was considered as "too much" is now possibly along the tenets of reasonable style. Either way, this way of displaying art can definitely attract they eyes of any visitor that...
Art

Veteran sculptor graces the Hessisches Landesmuseum with his ‘Unnatural Selection’ series

In an exhibition entitled Unnatural Selection, 20 of the best sculptures from renowned artist Tony Cragg will be displayed inside the majestic Hessisches Landesmuseum of Darmstadt. Tony Cragg is a British sculptor who comes from Liverpool. Over the years, he has made a big name for himself and his works have been featured in various projects, exhibits, and galleries all around the world. Thanks to the fluidity of his organic sculptures, Dr. Klaus-D. Pohl (curator) has decided to pick his work and showcase them in the grandiose main hall of the museum. Doing this will create a juxtaposition between the venue's religious ambiance and architecture against the more modern and futuristic forms of the artist. His pieces come in wood, glass, marble, and metal - reflecting his impressive mastery of his chosen material and his ability to create stunning impact with his visual work. The show has already begun last December 2 and will continue until March 26, 2017....
Architecture

The Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival is back, and 2017’s sculptures are bigger than ever

We have previously covered a story about the very same festival, back in 2013. The annual festival is coming soon this year, and the sculptures are crazier and bigger than ever. Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival is a tourist attraction for both local and foreign vacationers because it provides something completely new. Sure, we've all seen snow and ice one way or another, but what about ice sculptures that are bigger than life? Probably not. As you can see in the photos below, the festival takes a LOT of manpower, planning, and preparation to execute properly. And topping the previous years' already successful runs can be a humongous challenge to take. This festival isn't just about sculptures and lights towering among us, however. The very first ice lantern and sculpture dates back to ancient China, so this event is somehow giving us a glimpse of what life was back then. Today, people from all over the world come together to bask in the culture, art, and festivities...
Architecture

Unique cover art by legend M.C. Escher for most beloved classic books

M.C. Escher is one of the rare left brain-inclined artists of all time. Even long after his passing, his works continue to grace the cover of books, magazines, nonfictions, and even albums. For this reason, many publishers use his art for books that they think can be marketed towards the more "logical" of the reading audience, since the artist spent half of his career in mathematics and the other half in art. His pieces depict possibly unseen worlds through his lithographs, mezzotints, and woodcuts - using concepts from math to reflect "infinity" in ways no other artist has been able to. He made the viewer think and ponder, not just appreciate aesthetic. This Dutch artist has been published in who knows how many nonfiction publications, fantasy and sci-fi magazines, and of course, has had his work used as cover art for the most renowned books of our time. These include one edition of Edwin Abbott's Flatland, Clive Barker’s The Damnation Game, and George Orwell’s 1984...
Architecture

Breathtaking architecture of the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg

The Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg is going to be officially open in January 2017. Since the Elphirhamonie have been finished; there are lines of people waiting to get inside and see at least it's halls and the balcony. The Elbphilharmonie has three concert halls, a hotel, apartments, and a public square with a total height of 110 meters. This building is certainly the most interesting architectural novelty in Germany this year. For more detailed information and upcoming concerts check the official website. ...
Architecture

Artist spray paints intricate floor patterns to mimic traditional Catalan works

Awesome tiles in rundown places. That's how you get someone's attention. Javier De Riba is an artist with a knack for spray painting over floors and walls with intricate geometric patterns. It's amazing how perfectly crisp the patterns are at the edges because they're nearly indistinguishable from ones traditionally found in Catalan homes. Strategically placed in derelict, abandoned places, De Riba's pieces effectively impact the viewer upon first sight. Check out some of his works below and find more on both his website and Etsy. [caption id="attachment_74456" align="alignnone" width="950"] [/caption]  ...
Architecture

Installation provokes feelings of spring in the courtyard of Montpellier hotel

In 2015, pink and white hues took over the courtyard at the Hôtel de Griffy in Montpellier, France. The installation was an attempt at recreating the feeling of spring indoors with hues mimicking that of cherry blossoms as they descend from the ceiling. The six-day installation, titled “Un dixième Printemps (the 10th Spring),” was created by Margaux Rodot, Benoit Tastet, and Mickaël Martin. Drawing inspiration from Japanese tradition, Hanami, where an abundance of blooming flowers are found across the country from the end of March to early May, the installation was incredibly effective and won the 2015 Jury Award. Check it out below and learn more here. ...
Architecture

Architect designs the best treehouse we have ever seen

24-year-old architect and environmental advocate Aibek Almassov from Kazakhstan has been looking for the optimal solution to create homes without destroying trees and forests. After more than three years of hard work, the young founder of A. Masow Architects and Design Studio has finally come up with his version of saving the future generations: a unique "tree in a home" design. This is not your typical treehouse. The eco-home will involve modern and futuristic elements, but the biggest wow factor is, of course, the large tree found at its very center. The exterior walls are not just regular glass - they are coated with transparent solar cells which power the entire home and provide heat, using nothing less than a Tesla battery. Aside from solar energy, the home will also collect and purify natural rainwater for bathing and other needs. All drinking water will be recycled and purified, too. The roots will collect water naturally, which is made possible by the narrow...
Architecture

Before Google: the lost art of real estate maps

Remember when everything was much simpler? There was a time when we did not rely on technology or the internet. There was no Google to give us instant results for every single thing that we need. This included maps. These days, you can simply take your phone and type in a place and you'll get an instant map on your screen. It's impossible to get lost as long as you have cellular coverage. This is a nice moment to look back at the simplicity of the past. Even though it was a lot less convenient, it can't be helped to feel nostalgic and eerily proud of how talented manual labor is. Men and women actually drew maps using their bare hands. Just ink on paper. No fancy software and digital tools to help them out. Minneapolis is a great case in point. Its nice aerial views of buildings, streets, and highways are best appreciated when seen through these old school real estate maps. It's no bluff that these, in their own humble ways, are real pieces of art. ...
Architecture

Retro glamour in Leo’s Oyster bar

Leo’s Oyster bar is a relatively new hot spot in San Francisco. It “smells” retro with the botanical wallpaper, black and white tiles and floral decoration all around the place. The designer of the restaurant is San Francisco-based designer Ken Fulk. “Quintessentially masculine space that introduces tension with feminine qualities,” says Fulk for the midcentury dining room. Owners of this place Anna Weinberg and James Nicholas have created definitely a unique experience for their customers. For more information about the restaurant, its history, and the menu, check out their website here. ...
Architecture

Artist creates unique kinetic architecture from paper everyday for a year

We've seen 365-day long projects before where creatives challenge themselves to produce unique works every day for a year. Artist Charles Young did the same, but for him, it involved creating intricate paper sculptures to explore different architectural forms. Even after his self-imposed 365-days were up, he kept going and now he's made about 635 buildings. Each structure comprises of moving parts that Young animates and shares regularly on Tumblr. The entire city will be on display from November 10-26, 2016 at the NEoN Digital Arts Festival in Dundee, Scotland. Check it out below! ...
Architecture

Hundreds of steel rods make up these deceiving architectural sculptures

Steel rods wouldn't be your first choice when trying to make architectural models with just one material. But David Moreno chose just that. The Spanish artist used hundreds of steel rods and coils of piano wire to construct architectural sculptures that look as if they were 2D illustrations. The rows of house-like buildings are purposely made to look like uneven collections of sticks. Moreno deliberately wanted to link each sculpture with 2D drawing as part of his stylized process of "trying to draw sculptures." Check out some of the models below and find more of his work on Behance. ...
Architecture

A Cirque du Soleil-themed amusement park is on its way!

We don't know much about the project since everything is still very 'hush-hush' but what we do know sounds amazing! It's going to be built in the Vidanta resort in Nuevo Vallarta, Mexico and is internally referred to as "The Park." There will be daylong performances set across beautifully-designed, lush and green sets. The park will offer a blend of immersive entertainment and the luxury vacationing experience that Vidanta is known for. Three hotels fitted with a range of amenities like a "VIP hydrotherapy circuit for adults, experiential and interactive entertainment experiences, and embedded CDS actors." Check out some of the concept work below and head on over here to learn more! ...
Art

The detail in Taylor Mazer’s dark illustrations is eye-melting!

How on Earth does Taylor Mazer make these extremely detailed sketches with just a micron pen? The Michigan-based freelance illustrator is a master of making dark alleyways and facades look so photogenic, you'd think they were photographs. Detailed brick by brick, Mazer's micron pen illustrations set in the Midwest, when viewed up close reveal a truly time-consuming process. Mazer is currently attending Kendall College of Art and Design in Grand Rapids. Check out some of his illustrations below and find more of his work on Behance or Instagram. If you're interested in prints, head on over to his shop.  ...
Architecture

Japanese chapel architecture inspired by hands in prayer

You don't expect to stumble upon incredible architecture on a random walk through the woods. Yet, the Sayama Forest Chapel exists and delivers just that. The three-year-old building, designed by Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP, was designed to imitate a star and two hands pressed in prayer when viewed from above. The chapel is inspired by the traditional Japanese structural form, “Gassho-zukuri.” The aim of the project was to create a welcoming traditional venue that still allows room for the surrounding forest to grow and retain its shape. Nakamura, while talking to Yellowtrace said, "For those who are in deep grief and inconsolable, how can architecture nurture them? With this in mind, I designed buildings that gently surround them and support their intentions." Check out some images of the structure below and find more splendid works from the group on their website. ...
Architecture

Massive zeppelin-like structure “lands” atop Prague art museum

Zeppelins are arguably very cool in general, in-flight or not.  Fortunately for zeppelin lovers, the Dox Center for Contemporary Art in Prague has just added another zeppelin to the world - and perhaps best of all, you can actually go inside it! Measuring in at about 138-feet, the tube-like structure sits atop the Center and is meant to serve as a public space for readings, performances, and debates. The space can seat up to 120 people comfortably and was designed as part of a collaborative effort between the center’s founder, Leos Valka, and architect Martin Rajnis. "Our aim for the world of contemporary art is to spread and get partially interconnected with the world of literature," Valka told AP, adding that "it’s a world of pure imagination, a children’s world." Check out some images below and find process photos on Pinterest, Google Photos, and on Facebook. ...
Architecture

Dreamlike gothic architecture depicted in striking watercolor illustrations

Gothic architecture and watercolor never looked as good together as they do in artist Sunga Park’s new sketchbook! The Bangkok-based illustrator and graphic designer travels throughout Europe observing Gothic architecture, which comes to life in her watercolor illustrations. Her latest works feature the finest details found in some of the glorious buildings on the streets of Croatia. As the paint bleeds on from one drawing to the next, one can't help but admire the hazy imagery. Here are some of her latest illustrations. If you'd like to see more, follow Park on Instagram and on Behance. ...
Architecture

Chaotic watercolor grids depict brilliant abstract architectural renderings

Abstract architecture depicted using watercolors is certainly a match made in artistic heaven in the recent works by Jacob van Loon. The Colorado artist alludes to architectural renderings in his works that combine watercolor and  abstract geometric patterns in perspective. The dense lines spectacularly feature color bleeding through borders in a chaotic fashion. In an interview with The Creator’s Project, van Loon said, "When I’m ready for color, it’s not just about pragmatically filling in the spaces, it’s about putting paint down, letting it travel in the valleys and ridges, and seeing where and how it all comes to rest." Check out his latest work below and find more beautiful grids on his Instagram and Behance. ...
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