Art

Sculptor uses matchsticks and hangers to create large scale installations

David Mach is a Scottish sculptor and installation artist known for his dynamic and imaginative large-scale collages, sculptures, and installations using diverse media like coat hangers, matches, and magazines, among others. The Scotsman, a local online newspaper, describes his work as "big on gesture and big on proportion, it demands your attention and gets it". Many of his installations are temporary and constructed in public spaces. He studied arts and specialized on sculpture at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design. He chose this art because he considered it to be the most demanding, physically and intellectually. He first had his solo exhibition in 1982 at the Lisson Gallery in London. You can say The Scotsman is right. His huge presentations got the world's attention and quickly established his reputation. That exhibition was followed by countless international exposure. In his matchhead series, Mach re-imagines portraits using the colored...
Interior Design

Paper sculptures refresh the eyes with kaleidoscopic color palette

Jen Stark is an artist who creates intricate sculptures made of paper. Her pieces often remind the audience of kaleidoscope visions because of the bright colors. Born in Miami, Florida in 1983, Jen currently lives and works in Los Angeles. She got her Arts degree from Maryland Institute College of Art. She majored in fibers and minored in animation. Her artworks are three-dimensional pieces which take the paper to a whole new level of sculpture. Since the process of making her pieces are very tedious, she hired a few assistants to help her. It usually takes her a few days to a couple of months to complete a piece depending on the size and complexity. The largest project she has done so far is a mural and a sculpture she made for a mall in Chicago. For more of her work, visit her website or follow her social media accounts, Facebook and Instagram. ...
Art

Ron Mueck’s perturbing hyperrealist sculptures on view at Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts

Ron Mueck's works in the last two decades have been relatively few and far between, with only a little more than three dozen completed hyperrealist sculptures making up his oeuvre thus far. This sparseness, however, hasn't kept the Australian artist, who now works in the UK from becoming someone of great renown. That's bound to happen if one has a body of work that's evocative and perturbing as his are. Consisting of tiny and huge sculptures of mostly people (ranging from infants to the elderly ) that warrant a second look for confirmation of their inanimateness, Mueck's works have been in and out of museums around the world. Now, 13 of his sculptures will be on view at Houston's Museum of Fine Arts, after having spent time in museums in Paris, Sao Paolo and other cities. The exhibit will open on Feb. 25 and will run until May. You can view some of Mueck's hyperrealist sculptures below. ...
Art

My Heart is an Animal by Katarzyna and Marcin Owczarek

My Heart is an Animal is an ongoing photography project based on surrealistic imagery. It is made by photographer couple, Katarzyna and Marcin Owczarekwho, currently live and work in Belgium. The couple started working together in 2015. Katarzyna is a fashion/product designer and has a Master's degree in Arts while Marcin has been into photography since he was 20. Their brainchild, My Heart is an Animal, put their passion for digital photography to a whole new level when it was launched in 2016. It brings the viewers to the world of dreams, symbols, metaphors, allegories, legends, and myths. The process of hybridizing human and animal bodies is a rare kind of art that captures the audience's emotion regarding humanity, its power, passion, and state of mind. The couple aims to explore the infinite possibilities of human imagination, in search of a connection between reality and otherwise. Visit their website or follow them on Facebook and Instagram. ...
Art

Ali Harrison makes amazing hand-cut paper art

Ali Harrison is the founder of Light & Paper and the success of her art has an interesting back story. On her website, Ali shared how one fateful day in December when, in search of a unique Christmas gift, she decided to try a new craft. Using a borrowed box cutter and her kitchen cutting board, Ali created her first papercutting. After falling in love with cutting paper, she armed herself with a sharper blade and an actual cutting mat, and Light & Paper was born. At first, all Light & Paper items were hand-cut originals - but when it was near impossible to keep up with orders, Ali decided to begin lasercutting her designs. This success brought her to opening an online store and a physical shop in Toronto, Canada. Ali never considered herself as the artsy one. In fact, she admits being 100% self/internet-taught. To see more of her works, visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Art

French artist Abraham Poincheval will live inside a boulder for a week to ‘see what is really happening’

French artist Abraham Poincheval has in recent years been known for living inside a bear sculpture for 13 days. In a new performance art, the artist is doing it again, locking himself up in a stone block in which he will stay for a planned seven days. Poincheval entered the stone on Feb. 22 and will come out on March 1. Living inside an object is a way of understanding the nature of that object, the artist told journalists before embarking on his endeavor, taking place at Paris' Palais de Tokyo contemporary art museum. For him, it is in fact the superior way of comprehending. "I say to myself, hold on, what is this object really? And you ask yourself the question and say to yourself: 'Well, hold on, instead of distancing yourself and removing oneself from it, let's go inside and see what is really happening,'" Poincheval said. While inside the boulder, whose space within is patterned after the position of a seated person, Poincheval will subsist on stewed fruit, soups and purees....
Art

This child prodigy started painting before she could walk

Aelita Andre is a child prodigy. She learned to paint before she could walk. Born to parents who are both artists themselves, she grew up seeing them work on canvases on the floor. At age 9, she is considered to be the youngest painter to ever have her work featured in a solo museum exhibition. Born in Melbourne, Australia, Andre started painting at the age of 9 months. Her first solo exhibition was held at BSG Gallery in Melbourne. Since then, she has had 4 New York solo shows, 3 solo shows in Hong Kong, and a solo show in China. Her most recent solo exhibition was in 2016 entitled Music of the Infinite which was held at the Russian Academy of Fine Art Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia. Her painting style is categorized as magical expressionism. Her art mainly revolves around painting, soundpainting, music, drawing, sculpture, and installations. To see more of her works, visit her website and Facebook. ...
Cute

Do you want to learn how to draw a pineapple in just 20 seconds?

Sometimes, things do not have to be as complicated. When drawing or sketching, there are a lot of ways to keep things easy and simple. This is especially useful if you are just a beginner who wants to get hands into drawing (or art, in general). So if you are one of these people, take note of this post. Beano posted another "Quick Draw" tutorial, where you can find a video as well as step-by-step images of how to draw a pineapple. It's the most straightforward kind of instruction you can ever find online today. If you want, you can check out some of their other tutorials and posts in the "Quick Draw" category. Everybody starts from the easiest exercises. Soon enough, you'll be a pro artist capable of the most complicated sketches and subjects. By that time, you won't have to follow any tutorials at all. Check out some of Beano's step-by-step photos below. ...
Art

Julian Schnabel’s long-awaited return to painting celebrated with a larger-than-life exhibition

Julian Schnabel returns to painting after almost a decade of making a career shift towards filmmaking (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, nominated for an Oscar last 2007). Now, a full collection of plate paintings will be on display at New York's Pace Gallery. This will, in fact, be one of the most anticipated social and cultural events this February - and perhaps this year. When you get a chance, take a stroll down West 25th Street and see the show, which will run from February 24 until March 25. Schnabel says about the new series, “the fragments and colours make it feel like they’re made of leaves and that you’re not looking at a painting but at nature. Yet as soon as you step back from them, they assume a pictorial quality.” “Julian is one of the seminal artists of the 20th century, and he was a huge force for change in the 1980s and ’90s. And although he has been out of the spotlight for a number of years, people recognise him as a truly great artist who is rising again,”...
Art

Contemporary sculptures by today’s most important and talented artists on exhibit this year

Many colleges and universities give importance to art. All over the country, you'll find amazing appreciation for various art forms, some even putting into place extensive programs to nurture talent. One of these is Jesus College, which houses a grand permanent collection. You can find impeccable sculptures on their grounds, created by artists such as John Bellany, Stephen Chambers, Barry Flanagan, John Gibbons, Antony Gormley, Albert Irvin, Richard Long, David Mach, Sarah Morris, Humphrey Ocean, Eduardo Paolozzi, Cornelia Parker, and Alison Wilding. In addition, they also hold an event called "Sculpture in the Close" every year. Since 1988, this has been an annual tradition. The college has historic courts and properly maintained lawns, which make for perfect backdrops to the artworks. Of course, the sculptures themselves are the highlight of the event. Check out some of the astonishing sculptures found on the Jesus College grounds, photographed below:...
Art

Jan Cieslikiewicz confronts our discomfort with the random and uncertain with new photo series

"Null Hypothesis," a new series by Polish photographer Jan Cieslikiewicz, bears the trappings of scientific thought. The series takes its title from the name of a hypothesis which posits that the connection between two phenomena is random, unless a scientist proves that it is not at all and is therefore calculable. Considering that Cieslikiewicz went to Harvard to study mathematics and subsequently worked as a Wall Street trader, the theme -- or, more to the point, the thrust --- of "Null Hypothesis" isn't surprising. The photos in the series each show what appear to be unrelated or contradictory components, and it is with this disjunction that Cieslikiewicz seeks to confront viewers regarding their thoughts on and reactions to life's random events and uncertainties. "I don’t think humanity as a whole can accept and genuinely come to terms with fundamental randomness and uncertainty," the photographer says in a statement accompanying the series. "Accepting...
Architecture

Historic plans and drawings from the Nazi era available online at the Library of Congress

Roman Totenberg, a Polish violinist, was an immigrant who came to America in 1938. At the time, Europe was widely antisemitic, thanks to the influences of Nazi Germany. Totenberg put in a lot of effort to make sure his family is kept safe from the inevitable force of cataclysm. Previously - in 1935 - his mother joined him until she was also able to escape to the US when the Nazis took over France (1940). Totenberg's efforts, however, were not enough to save his sister Janina Ferster and her family, who were trapped in Warsaw as the war broke out. Janina lost her husband but survived together with her daughter until the Allies won the war. Janina's daughter, Elizabeth Wilk, now gifted the Library of Congress with some of the family's papers to be part of the Totenberg Collection. Vital materials such as documents, drawings, photo albums, letters, and telegrams are proof that they were in Poland before and during the Holocaust. These also serve as evidence of Totenberg's efforts...
Art

This galactic keyboard design looks good, but can you type well with it?

Massdrop is now selling the "GalaxC Keycap" keyboard set, now at $58. The purchase will only include the keycaps, without an actual keyboard, so you'll probably have to use the one you have. It is technically a set of mechanical keyboard caps that look like a galaxy. Now, this can be so much fun to look at. It will be exciting and unique, for sure, but once you actually use it, it can be quite a hassle. From the design point of view, it's absolutely stellar. But for functionality? We're betting you're probably going to pass on this one, unless you can type without looking at your keyboard at all. Otherwise, it may take you hours to finish a simple paragraph. So is it worth it? We'll leave the judging up to you. See some photos of this novelty keyboard below, with some closeup images, too. ...
Art

Classical paintings get a dose of humor with these meme-like captions

Medieval Reactions is taking the Internet on a rollercoaster ride of laughs and memes. We're used to seeing memes about celebrities, even politicians and athletes. But this Twitter account is taking the comedy up a notch - by using photos of medieval and classical paintings and adding a modernistic and humorous twist. This collection of photos definitely isn't for those who can't take a good joke and roll with it. Some will argue that it's not "proper" to make a laughing stock of such exceptional pieces of art, especially those created by renowned artists and icons, but we all need to relax and chill every so often. Thanks to whoever is responsible for this Twitter handle, we're seeing a modern glimpse of these centuries-old art pieces. It's not an easy task, too - imagine having to come up with constantly funny and new content for all your audiences! Kudos, Medieval Reactions! ...
Architecture

Ancient and modern cultural symbols blend in Cairo’s City of the Dead

At the sight of graffiti amid a historic site, the usual, or expected, reaction is one of disdain or anger, right? The huge colorful paintings of cartoon characters on the walls of an ancient necropolis in Cairo's City of the Dead, however, are instead drawing interest from locals and tourists alike because of the creative blending of the ancient and the contemporary. And that's exactly the aim of "Outside In: the Art of Inclusion," a project mounted within the 15th century complex built by Mameluk Sultan al-Ashraf Qaitbey which has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site . "What we want to do is to bring together the old heritage, the traditions of this particular place, with creative contemporary art and with various cultural events to promote diversity. Old meets new, death and life come together in the city of the dead, where we can exchange ideas and culture between East and West," Agnieszka Dobrowolska, the Polish architect who leads the project, told Reuters....
Art

‘Maker Faire Kuwait’ exploded with technology and art, featured some of the country’s brightest talents

Maker Faire Kuwait took place at the Kuwait International Fair, the largest event space available in the country, last February 9 to 11. It was a grand event that highlighted "makers" to share their work, collaborate with each other, and inspire younger generations of makers. Many of the participants used everyday objects as well as recycled materials to create astonishing works of art. This event is only one of the series of Maker Faire exhibitions. Be sure to watch out for the next destination to be included in the series. Below are some of the artists who participated in the Maker Faire Kuwait event. Check these out and be inspired to CREATE and MAKE! (From top to bottom: Pottery and Sculpture by Sara Al-muail, E-buru Paper Marbling Demo by Wael Al-saleh, Model Ships by Ali Mohsen, Art by Omer Al-hamed, and Scroll Saw Art by Faten Fahad.) ...
Animation

‘The Dragon Spell’ is Ukraine’s first ever full-length 3D animated movie, proves successful overseas

Mykyta Kozhumiaka is the first ever full-length 3D animated feature to come out of Ukraine (in English, it translates to "Nicky Tanner and the Dragon Spell"). It has been collecting high praise and receiving warm reviews from various countries abroad. While it isn't at its target box office sales just yet, it isn't doing too bad for its first week - both in Ukraine and abroad. It is planned to screen the movie in as many as 60 countries, with Poland and Turkey as the first two on the list. The Dragon Spell traces its origins from the creations of Anton Siyanika, a Ukranian writer. The tale is about a young boy who takes himself on a grand adventure to save two worlds: that of humans and that of magic against an evil witch possessed by the ghost of a dragon. He goes on a quest alongside the wizard in training Eddie and a feral child, Rocky. In the process, they learn what it means to be a true hero. Find out more about the story from Siyanika's blog, and about the animation from The Dragon...
Art

Mandala sand painting courtesy of actual Tibetan Buddhist monks featured in college gallery

Drepung Loseling Monastery Buddhist monk all the way from Tibet will be constructing a mandala sand painting, to be featured as a highlight of Allegheny College's Year of Mindfulness. The painting will be housed at the art galleries of the college. The actual construction will take place on March 1 until March 3, from 10 AM to 6 PM daily and on March 4 from 10 AM to 12:30 PM. It will be open to the public for free, which can create a nice opportunity for both the students and the locals. Mandala sand painting truly is one of the most unique traditions that root from Tantric Buddhism. Colored sand will be used, making the exhibit even more one-of-a-kind, as it is placed onto the platform for several days to create the mandala image. Mandala is a symbol of the universe, and it coincides with the event's theme of mindfulness. Be sure to check out this rare event if you can! ...
Art

Revisit WWI in an exhibition that highlights the impact of the Great War on American artists

The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) will host a thoroughly in-depth look at how WWI has affected American artists and their wok. Entitled World War I and American Art, the event will showcase 173 works by 80 different artists. Popular contributors to the exhibit include John Singer Sargent, Horace Pippin, Ivan Albright, Georgia O’Keeffe and more. The exhibit is not limited to one form; it will host various kinds of artwork such as paintings, photographs, animation, sculptures, and many others. We shall be able to get a closer look at the evolution of American art, probably contrary to popular belief. The World War art genre has often been overshadowed by pieces that came from Europe rather than America. This show gives us a comprehensive examination from the perspective of our American artists. History and art lovers will appreciate this opportunity. It may even change public perception about the evolution of American Modernism. The event...
Art

Los Angeles-based artist creates inspiring and chic art from nothing but rope and metal fragments

For most of us, art requires a lot of fancy materials and resources. If we were given nothing more than rope, pieces of tiny metal fragments, and some watercolor, we'll probably stare at it and do nothing much. But for L.A.-based artist Cindy Zell, this is not the case. Given these items, she is able to create not just art, but magic in its rarest form. Zell is gaining a nice following because of her sophisticated taste and hands-down raw talent. Her sculptures are "material-driven" and have been decorating Los Angeles recently. She tends to lean towards pastel-washed and light-hued pieces, which reminds us that delicate isn't always weak. It can give us the balance that we all need, especially is such a fast-paced and competitive world. Minimalists and art lovers, in general, will love her work. Find out more about her by following her on Instagram. Her current exhibition is entitled "ROPETITION" and is on display in San Francisco, CA right now until March 7th.  ...
Art

Takashi Murakami’s works re-imagined through glorious and breathtaking face paintings

Takashi Murakami is one of the most talented artists who can create art from the bizarre and eccentric. His works have spanned across various media platforms, using different techniques and materials along the way. But perhaps the most impressive of his work are those done with vivid colors and bold hues. Many artists are inspired by this kind of statement, so imagine what happened when the Make Up For Ever makeup school took it upon themselves to recreate Murakami's works using face paint! The results are very unlike what we've seen out there so far. And this is all in a good way. The apprentice artists who took the project definitely proved themselves worthy and ready to take the makeup world by storm, because if Murakami was to see their work, he would truly be honored and happy with how they interpreted his works of art. Check out their face paintings below. ...
Art

Breathtaking artbook based on Norse mythology by award-winning illustrator makes waves on Kickstarter

Milivoj Ćeran is back on Kickstarter and is garnering excessive amounts of backing and support from loyal fans and brand new admirers alike. His new project is about Norse mythology art. Unlike most mythology books, though, this will focus more on the artistic expressions of the stories and the characters that create this magical realm. We'll get a nice reminder about the long-forgotten gods, giants, monsters, heroes, and other creatures that inspired Vikings. See trolls, elves, dwarves, giant wolves and snakes - as well as the rest of the inhabitants of the nine Viking worlds. Norse myth makes everything possible, magic a common happening, and weaponry an everyday ritual for everyone. In this book, Ceran gives brilliant illustrations and paintings which are followed up by subservient captions. By looking at these images alone, we can instantly feel nostalgic to the lost heritage of Norse myth. Find out more about Ceran, the book, or the Kickstarter project...
Art

The fragility of abandoned trash preserved, collection exhibited as ‘Wood Sculpture’

Matt Johnson is one of the most eccentric young artists that come from New York. He has had many successful projects and exhibits before, but his latest one may top his list. Entitled Wood Sculpture, it simply is that: pieces of trashed, abandoned, disfigured pieces of wood that has been repurposed to show the "fragile" side of his pieces. 303 Gallery in New York currently houses the exhibit, which is quickly gaining traction from art lovers and curious fans. This takes Johnson back home. Although currently residing in Los Angeles (where he also studied his art), the artist was born in New York. It will be a sweet homecoming for the sculptor as his amazing art is featured in one of the top galleries in the area. Take a look at the photos of some of his installations and sculptures featured in the exhibition below. You can learn more about the artwork from the gallery's website. ...
Art

Check out this spring-inspired chic art featuring 2017’s color of the year: Greenery

The art-deco blog SFGirlByBay, headed by editor-in-chief Victoria Smith, is a great resource for anybody who is looking for some design inspiration. Whether it's for interior design or simple home decorating that stands out from the old and stale, then you can count on this site to get fresh and zesty ideas from each post. One particular idea shared by Smith is the use of "greenery" as an update to your decor's color palette. More specifically, using art that has spring-like themes and colors. This eliminates the challenge of adding art and color, because it hits two birds in one stone. Check out the photos below to get a clearer picture. These are from Smith's curated art collection in collaboration with Art.com. Whether you're from San Francisco or not, these can definitely give you tons of decorating ideas that you can try out at home. ...
Art

A silent revolt: Using images and art to address our culture’s most critical issues

Perpetual Revolution: The Image and Social Change is an exhibition that is more than fitting, given our current societal cloud. The display of various artwork tackles six crucial issues that have been transformed by visual culture: #BlackLivesMatter, gender fluidity, climate change, terrorist propaganda, the right-wing fringe and the 2016 election, and the refugee crisis. It is a movement that proposes that a revolution is ongoing with regard to our politics and society - including technological innovations that allow the creation and spread of images - all of which have massive impact on social change. Over the past years, the transformation in our country's politics and culture have been epic and require our utmost attention. Perpetual Revolution takes a hard look at the image world that we are facing. It challenges us to explore the ever-changing and often-violent behaviors that come with it. This exhibit is truly mirroring the tradition of ICP in looking...
Art

L.C. Armstrong takes New York by flowers

Marlborough Gallery launched another art exhibition for L.C. Armstrong newest work entitled Signals at Sunset. The exhibit opened on February 8th and will run until March 4th. As announced, Signals at Sunset continues Armstrong’s explorations of the surreal and the hyperreal. Expanding upon the language of Magic Realism these flowerscapes, a term coined by writer Luanne McKinnon, depict bright, intensely detailed flowers over maximalist landscapes both real and imagined. This artist's practice of layering acrylic on linen panels imparts a luminosity and a pearly, otherworldly glow to her works. Radiance often comes from an imposing sun and the flowers that populate the paintings loom larger than life and are often improbably bright. Armstrong was born in Humboldt, Tennesse. She worked multiple jobs to be able to send herself to school. She finished Fine Arts both from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena in '82 and San Francisco Art Institute in San...
Art

Photos tackle importance of play to children in hostile environments

Mark Neville's photographs often focus on difficult circumstances, such as hazardous waste dumps and war, as well as the latter's offshoots like post-traumatic stress disorder. In his new exhibition, titled "Child's Play" and which features works collected over a 15-year period, children and the importance of play in their lives stand front and center. The theme may sound like a respite from the unpleasant realities Neville usually tackles with his art, but the catch is many of the children in the photographs are pictured in hardly livable places: a refugee camp in Kenya and a war-torn region in Ukraine, among others. In these dangerous environments, play is a breathing space, according to Neville. Play is "an outlet, a release, a kind of therapy,” the photographer said. "It allows children “to make sense of the horrors going on in the adult world and deal with them." "Child's Play" was launched on Feb. 3 and will run until April 30 at the Foundling Museum in London....
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