Art

Gameboy, Blackberry, iPhone, and more retro gaming patents sold as wall art

For most people, a classical painting or artistic portrait is the ideal hanging on the wall. Others settle for motivational posters for its simplicity and neutrality. But for gaming enthusiasts, there are not many choices to choose from. Luckily, a newly-opened online store has just opened that would definitely amaze the gaming community. Retro Patent, a project-cum-startup, features patent prints of historical gaming icons as wall décor. The collection ranges from the iconic Gameboy, to advanced technological inventions such as the Blackberry and the iPhone. The online shop founders Aidan Sliney and Craig Watson came up with the idea when they were traveling to Copenhagen with their wives. It was in a small boutique shop that they discovered a patent print of the classic Harley-Davidson. It was a personal project at first but eventually became a business once people started asking them for copies. The Retro Patent wall hangings come in 12 x 8 inches and 24 x 36 inches...
Art

Russian artist illustrates brutally honest portraits of the modern world

Vladimir Kazak certainly aims for a lasting great impression with his new collection. The Russian-born artist, who, according to his website, enjoys “drawing women and airplanes,” perfectly depicts modern day thinking in his brutally honest illustrations. His shocking portrayal of everyday life shows the irony and truth about people in this age that is almost never talked about. The artist argues his works are purely satirical and insists the comical factor of his collection. One of the illustrations show people, all made to look like robots, sitting indifferently beside each other inside a train. Another illustration shows an aerial view of a woman’s covered breasts with hungry-looking pigs all sitting around her. This particular art was thought to seemingly point out the unwanted harassments that women are subjected to every day. Some critics think Kazak’s art is too political while others seem to agree with his unobstructed view of the modern world....
Art

‘Memorial Stitches’ artist creates embroidered heirlooms that are seamless, even without formal training

Carrie Violet of Memorial Stitches studied both fashion design and illustration. Because of this, it makes most sense that embroidery becomes second nature to her as it allows her to apply both skills seamlessly. Although she did not have any formal embroidery training, her style never stopped improving until her works became a flawless tactile version of what is normally a paint on canvas and pen on paper for other artists. Carrie is from North of England and her pieces are inspired by the Victorian era, particularly the aesthetics and mood of that time in history. She describes her style as delicate, dark, and ethereal. Aside from Victorian sentimentality, she has repeated doing several themes like locks of hair, dainty hands, or love notes. Most of her works are purchased as an heirloom, wall decor, or a memorial piece. For more of her amazing works, visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Architecture

Marcel Breuer’s legacy in architecture and design is remembered in photos at the Met Breuer

The Met Breuer, the iconic museum in Manhattan, New York, formerly known as the Whitney Museum of American Art, has commissioned photographers Luisa Lambri and Bas Princen to take photos of some of the renowned works of the museum's namesake and architect, Marcel Breuer (1902-1981). Now exhibited at "Breuer Revisited: New Photographs," the museum's first architecture exhibition under its new name, Lambri and Princen's works capture the modernist spirit of Breuer's approach to architecture and as well as pay tribute  to the visionary quality of his oeuvre. Lambri and Princen took compelling snapshots of four of Breuer's landmark buildings, namely the Saint John’s Abbey Church in Collegeville, Minnesota, the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the IBM Research center in La Gaude, France, and, fittingly, the Met Breuer, which is renowned particularly for its form as an inverted ziggurat. The photos are characterized by their masterful employment of chiaroscuro,...
Art

The prominent nose of Zan von Zed’s fierce females

Unlike other artists, Zan von Zed, a doodler and painter from Sydney, Australia does not usually have back stories for her art. Most, if not all, of her masterpieces, are pencil-drawing of fierce females. In an interview with Beautiful Bizarre, she admitted to drawing without a plan. She generally just begins with a face and let the drawing evolve. As for the prominent noses, there's not much of a message she wants to send. It's just her plain liking for faces with prominent real noses, contrary to the whittled-down, Hollywood cookie-cutter ones depicted everywhere. Needless to say, this adds an extra oomph to the strength and dignity these females offer. For Zan, drawing is an outlet. And interestingly, she gets inspiration from Pinterest and Tumblr. She usually completes a painting within two 2 days if using watercolor, one day for colored drawing, and weeks for an oil painting. For more of this artist's beautiful creations, visit her website, Facebook, Tumblr,...
Art

Fashion photographer takes cinematic images that embody melancholic symbolism

Fashion has worked side by side with photography to give the audience a complete experience visually. Artists like Elizaveta Porodina is one of those who brings success to these collaborations bringing the spectators to a whole new level of understanding of the art. Porodina was born in Moscow. In her experimental fashion and fine art photography, she travels through time and space, extracting the underlying emotions in her entrancing productions. She studied clinical Psychology and this could just be the biggest influence on her masterpieces. Her melancholic symbolism sets connotations, sometimes ambiguous, sometimes honest and obvious. Her imagery range widely varying between cinematic, fashion and almost documentary. This artist had a couple of exhibitions in 2016. She had worked with magazines like Vogue, Elle, among others. She also had collaborations with Louis Vuitton, BMW MINI, and others for commercials. More information about Porodina can...
Art

Celebrate love in a brand new way for your special ones with these striking paper hearts

At once striking and minimal, these framed hearts by FROM PAPER WITH LOVE on Etsy accentuate your V-Day celebrations. The Russia-based graphic designer launched the project as an ode to Valentines Day. The paper creations come in the shape of polygonal hearts fixed inside of a frame. The best part about them is that they're actually meant to be assembled by a couple. The very act of putting the hearts together and then framing them is part of the experience and is sure to foster affection. Check out some of the hearts below and gift one to your significant other, Valentines Day or not! Pick 'em here!      ...
Art

Artist breathes new life into found objects by placing them in unrelated drawings

Have you ever found yourself seeing or regarding something as an entirely different, and much bigger, thing? Neuroscience PhD student and artist Desirée De León most certainly has, and her online project "100 Days of Tiny Things" sprang right out of an instance in which she gave life to a found object by treating it in a way that only someone with artistic inclinations would. “I remember noticing the disembodied head on the coins,” she says, “and I impulsively drew a speech bubble coming out of the coin’s mouth.” De León's series is a collection of minuscule objects that she has put a spin on and, thus, given a new existence to by situating them in drawings that point to an entirely different context. One work features a real orange segment that took on the image of the sun after De León drew a tree and giraffes beside it. Another work shows a dried flower heading in the direction of a drawing of dinosaurs, suggesting that it was the asteroid that killed the creatures....
Architecture

Handcrafted and industrial materials woven into highly expressive and functional pieces

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is currently having an exhibition entitled Design Currents. It opened last November and will continue to run until the 12th of March. The exhibit is the culmination of the work of three contemporary designers, Oki Sato, Faye Toogood, and Zanini de Zanine. All of them use handcrafted and industrial materials, turning them into functional and expressive pieces of art. The event creates a bridge between context and creativity. It gives us an insider look at the distinct culture of each designer, who all come from different countries. At the same time, we learn how collaboration and experimentation can help us improve our relationship with different objects. The event creates a bridge between context and creativity. It gives us an insider look at the distinct culture of each designer, who all come from different countries. At the same time, we learn how collaboration and experimentation can help us improve our relationship with different...
Culture

Israeli girls photographed at age 15 and 20: See the powerful transformation unfold

Comparative photography has successfully been embedded in today’s modern culture. From scrawny then-and-now pictures to memorable “Throwback Thursday” posts, the new technology-crazed generation has become more creative in sharing photos that show interesting and, most of the time, funny comparisons. A young Israeli, however, managed to take the whole "flashback" trend into new, powerful heights in just one photo series. Neta Dror, a Tel-Aviv-based photographer, started her project back in 2011 by taking photographs of Israeli girls – all aged 15 but came from different backgrounds. In 2016, she followed up on the girls and took again their photographs expecting to document some kind of change. The series was named, fittingly and simply, “At 15 & 20” – and the results of the photographic analysis were stunning. From innocent poses to defensive gazes, the evident changes in their body languages were perfectly captured by Dror. Some had...
Art

Artist makes amazing portraits by gluing bits of junk together, forming incredible images in the process

Zac Freeman graduated cum laude from his degree of Fine Arts at Jacksonville University, Florida in 1997. What might seem to be useless for others, this Florida-based artist turns into a thing of beauty. He creates artworks made entirely of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. He started collecting these materials in 1999. He glues the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. His art communicates through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. He values the importance of incorporating actual object or junk in the finished product as he believes it carries energy in itself. Freeman's work has been commissioned for use in commercials for Absolut Vodka. In 2010, he won the Art Chicago award and has been exhibited at major art fairs in London, Miami, Chicago, Toronto, Houston and the Hamptons, New York. To get...
Art

Artist intricately illustrates flora and fauna as album art, print ads, and other forms of media

Erica Williams is an artist from Colorado but is currently based in Minneapolis. She went to Kansas City Art Institute for a year before becoming a freelance illustrator. Although her major influences are history, fiber arts, tattoo culture, folklore, fables, and mythology, it is her love for nature that significantly impacts her art. Growing up, she used to spend summers in rural Georgia where she was surrounded by forests and farmland. Years later, she is known for creating stunning, meticulous illustrations of anything found in nature -- mostly plants, flowers, and animals. Interestingly, although she has clients from different industries, her style also brought her a lot of clientele from the entertainment scene -- musicians and theaters, among others. She usually creates posters, album arts, print advertisements, and even t-shirt designs for her clients. She also accepts hand lettering projects. To know more about Erica and her works, she's on Facebook,...
Art

CAPTURED: Split seconds between dreaming and waking

Martin Stranka is an award-winning professional photographer from Prague, Czech Republic. Stranka's approach to photography never fails to capture his audience as he tries to etch a unique space located in balance and serenity resulting to images that seem to exist in that narrow window of a few seconds between dreaming and awakening. For a self-taught artist, Stranka has gone quite a long way. His solo and group exhibitions have been seen from South and North America, through Europe, all the way to Asia. His photographs have been exhibited in places such as New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Tokyo, Milan, London, Miami, Paris, Prague, Hong Kong, Kiev and many more. He has created book covers for the biggest New York publishers, such as Harper Collins Publishers and Sterling Publishing. In addition, he has collaborated with other book publishers, music publishers, and artists around the world. Visit his website, Facebook, and Instagram for more of his stunning...
Creativity

This designer creates exquisite costumes and headdresses for the stage

Agnieszka Osipa, 30, is a designer of headdresses and stage costumes. She was born in Nowa Sarzyna, a small town in southeastern Poland. Based on her works alone, it is obvious that she's a master of doing designs and actually creating them. Because of this, she has the rare advantage of transforming her stellar ideas to real masterpieces to the delight of the client, the wearer, the photographer, or whoever sees her works. She draws influence from music. She prefers to listen to dark folklore, ambient pagan, and folk metal which, needless to say, is the reason her pieces have the same dark appeal. One notable favorite material that she uses is leather due to its armory vibe. Some of the basic processes she does are leatherwork, sewing, and beading. Interestingly, this artist is not a fan of showing herself to public. So let's just feast on her art, shall we? Visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Books

“Reunions” – where we are going to be in 30 years?

Street photographer Chris Porsz was actively photographing ordinary people during the 70s and 80s in his hometown Peterborough in England. During the ten previous years, Porsz tried to find the characters from his pictures and invite them for a nostalgic reunion. Guess what, his project was very successful and resulted in the 135 reunions and a book. For this kind of project, one has to plan, research and invest energy. However, the pictures evoke empathic and wonderful emotions in every viewer and surely it was an unforgettable experience for the participants in this project. Below you will find a handful of photos from the book. To order the book and find out a bit more about the characters on the photos click here. ...
Art

Yayoi Kusama and the interesting story behind her art

Yayoi Kusama could just be one of the, if not the most, legendary living artists we have today. This 87-year-old Japanese virtuoso has worked in a variety of media including painting, collage, sculpture, installations, performance art, film, and writing. Most, if not all, of her works revolve around her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition, and pattern. Kusama's inspiration in creating is quite unusual. Her art is largely influenced by how she wants her viewers to get a glimpse and understanding of how her reality looks like. Interestingly, this artist has experienced hallucinations and severe obsessive thoughts since childhood which often is suicidal in nature. This can be due to the physical abuse she suffered from her mother as a small child. It was earlier in her career that she discovered what eventually became her trademark -- polka dots, or infinite nets as she calls them. For her, art is therapy and she describes herself as an obsessive...
Inspiration

Anna Ådén makes you fall in love with beautiful Nothern Sweden

We know artists to have different styles and different niche. Some have a long back story for their choice -- a coming-of-age life event or a significant memory. Anna Ådén need not have a story. She did not have to bring her camera far as the masterpiece is already surrounding her, waiting to be captured. And she did. Anna is a 27-year-old freelance photographer from Umeå, a city in the Northern part of Sweden. She takes amazing photographs of the beauty of nature, landscapes, and lifestyle in her home throughout the seasons. She has participated in several group exhibitions in Sweden and Germany. Her work has also been featured in different local magazines. Just a mere scan of her photography in her blog and website gives you the ultimate Swedish experience. Makes you want to pack your bags and book that flight. For more of her stunning works, visit her on Facebook, Instagram, and Flickr.   ...
Art

Tray tables of Delta Airlines aircraft come alive with colorful drawings of vibrant cities

Passengers of one of Delta Airlines' Boeing 767 planes will be in for a treat when they assume their places on the aircraft. Right on the tray tables in front of the, they will see vibrant drawings by a number of artists commissioned by the airline as part of an initiative to celebrate the liveliness and culture of several cities around the world. The artworks in the project, which was mounted in cooperation with Coca-Cola, feature the artists' interpretation of life in London, Sao Paulo, Shanghai, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, and Seoul, among others. Some of the artists who took part in the campaign are Stevie Gee, who depicted Los Angeles; Alex Yanes, who drew Sao Paulo; Ping Zhu, who tackled Shanghai; Pedro Campiche, who made an artistic representation of New York City; Sac Magique, who submitted a collage-like drawing of Amsterdam; and Yulia Brodskaya, who took on Seoul. Their drawings appear below in the order that they were mentioned. The original trays are...
Architecture

Homogenous restaurant designed “like a fallen tree” takes shape in a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Primarily designed for a competition back in 2015, the Oberhulz Mountain Hut, a restaurant made entirely out of locally-sourced wood, has just opened to the public. The winning cantilevered design is constructed 6500 feet high in the Dolomites Mountain Range, one part of the Italian Alps identified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The elegant structure is true to its main concept – purposely following the mountain’s slope and spreading out like three branches of a fallen tree. The interiors of these branches are just as significant and expressive as the façade. Each section is separated from the other with protruding wood trusses that extend their lengths from the ceiling down to the walls. This classic structural design, in turn, transforms the three sections into intimate pockets and, with the use of a glass wall façade, offers users uninterrupted views of the surroundings. All furniture used is made of local oak. The homogenous architecture is a nod to the...
Art

Science appreciated through art, art appreciated through science in ‘Science as Art’

The “Science as Art” exhibit is a one-of-a-kind event that will run until March 3 at the Washington State Legislative Building. It will continue from March 6 to April 8 at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle. This has been an annual exhibition that featured images courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "I always really like science as art because it lets you show something in a way that is more universally relatable. You don't have to have a technical background to be interested," says Nicole Overman, a materials engineer who captured the tungsten-copper alloy's close-up. The researchers at PNNL have been selecting, coloring, and submitting images for the Science as Art event since 2010. John LaFemina, the laboratory director, said, "We had all these images that were too interesting and too beautiful to hide in a drawer somewhere." And thus, the yearly tradition was born - and the rest of the country is now enjoying these exceptional...
Creativity

#GandalfTheGuide: Photographer documents his tour of Middle Earth

Akhil Suhas is a photographer who was blessed enough to live and study in a country with an endless amount of scenery and landscapes to offer -- New Zealand. Of course, we know this country to be the very place where J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings took place. In the novel, he calls it the Middle Earth. Naturally, Suhas took advantage of this privilege, went to a 15,000-kilometer adventure and documented it using photos. With so many people already touring the country due to its LOTR fame, this photographer wanted to stand out. He first tried taking photographs of himself in a Gandalf costume using a tripod but it didn't work for him. He then decided to ask people he met along the way to put on the outfit and surprisingly, they agreed. This cross-country tour was life-changing for Suhas and if you follow him on Instagram, and see his photographs and stories, it could change your life, too. His website is also worth checking out. Enjoy! ...
Architecture

Illustrations pay homage to the rough beauty of Brutalist architecture

Eschewing refinement, Brutalist architecture was both a reaction to the style that came before it and a necessity of the times. The movement, characterized by ruggedness and bulk and which saw its glory from the 1950s through the 1970s, rejected the flair and finesse of 1930s and 1940s architecture and, at the same time, answered the need for inexpensive structures which resulted from the economic depression that followed the Second World War. Because of its disregard for comfort, at least in a visual sense, Brutalism -- whose name is derived from the French word "brut," which means raw -- has often been overlooked, notwithstanding the appreciation it got for its straightforwardness and utilitarian quality. In recent years, however, Brutalism has experienced a resurgence in popularity. The Brutalist idiom is once again being showcased, discussed and analyzed, on the Internet, in books, and even in film, such as the 2015 dystopian feature "High Rise." Brutalism...
Digital

Bea Nagy captures dreamy Amsterdam after a snowfall

There is a broad spectrum of attractions for recreational and cultural sightseeing in Amsterdam. The main tourist attractions are museums. The city has over fifty museums which attract millions of visitors every year. However, Hungarian photographer Bea Nagy, who is currently based in the city, didn't need to go far or visit a particular tourist spot to use as subject to her photography project. She takes photos of Amsterdam often but her favorite season is when it snows. For her, the white blanket makes the entire city look pure and innocent. Bea tries to tell stories in each photograph with the intention of evoking emotions to her viewers. She aims to capture events as they happen so as to leave amazing memories when the moment is gone. If you haven't been to Netherlands, let alone Amsterdam, these images will surely make you consider it. Visit her website, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to see more of her works. ...
Fashion

Korean visual artist creates psychedelic fashion-inspired art

Eunjong Yoo, a young Korean visual art graduate, started her artistic career working various fashion-related jobs before pursuing her real passion of illustrating. After completing her BFA illustration at The School of Visual Art in Korea, she went on to work as a fashion director where she would direct ad campaigns and create ideas and mock ups for visual branding as a graphic designer. Her art is heavily inspired by fashion which, according to her, is one of her work’s top inspirations. With the use of mixed media, her heavy, artistically sloppy lines and bold colors help her express her art and tell stories in a unique, creative way. She gets all the excitement from her environment, the cult fashion, the bustling scenes of the city, and even the simplicity of nature. According to Eunjong Yoo, she stays “intuitive, but analyzing is my second nature. In every project, I value the process of analytical studies for bringing the creative vision to life.” She currently...
Architecture

David Burdeny captures Italy’s breathtakingly decadent interiors

Italy is widely known for its rich and opulent architecture. But none has ever captured this grand architectural era in its full glory and color – until David Burdeny. An interior design and architecture graduate of the University of Manitoba, David Burdeny has now turned his attention into appreciating the structure, colors, and materials through photography. Just like his former photographic venture focusing on Moscow’s subway station, this project was pursued to give an ode to Italy’s long forgotten but still decadent interior design. It is like walking into a history class on Italy’s early architecture. The collection shows the ceiling murals and paintings, the intricate craftsmanship of sculpture and molding, the huge foyers and hallways adorned with sophisticated and opulent furniture. Italy’s wealthy days has truly been captured in Burdeny’s photo series. Burdeny would like to think that “there is a mystery at the heart of all my photographs,...
Nature

Amazing underwater photography taken by UPY photographer of the year winner, finalists

UK’s Underwater Photographer of the Year contest has just recently concluded and the winning photographs definitely did not disappoint. The contest was created primarily to celebrate the photographic talents of individuals in the field of underwater photography. The range of locations can vary from lakes to swimming pools to the sea – basically under any body of water. Along with the main award, the competition also has 10 other mini categories that test the skills of photographers namely Wide Angle, Behavior, Macro and Wreck photography. Gabriel Barathieu, with his “Dancing Octopus” submission, was revealed to be this year’s Underwater Photographer of the Year. The British Underwater Photographer of the Year, not to be mistaken with the former, was awarded to Nick Blake with his freshwater sinkhole photo entitled “Out Of The Blue.” Horacio Martinez was named Up & Coming Underwater Photographer of the Year with his white tip shark portrait...
Art

Artists from all over the world converge in the Centre for Computing History to create Teletext art

Teletext seems like an ancient relic to most of us. But just recently, artists from all over the world came together in an event to create Teletext art. They met in Cambridge at the Centre for Computing History, reveling in the wonder of the artform. For these people, this is not all old news - instead, it is a current, exciting, and real way to express themselves. They spent an entire weekend celebrating this unique form of art in a congregation known as the "Block Party". Raquel Meyers, a Swedish artist who has been amazed in using Teletext as an art form since 2012, explained: “It isn’t something you can make a profit from, so you can actually play with it. The idea is to show to people that you can do really crazy things and be really creative with something that’s supposed to be limited.” See the celebration and learn more about Teletext from the museum's website. ...
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