Category: Vintage

Art

Contemporary Islamic art as a means to connect the past, present, and future

Islamic art's parameters have gone beyond the traditional definitions over the past few years. Museums, private collectors, and gallery curators have paved the way towards a more contemporary age of works coming from the Middle East. Islamic artists have started to garner inspiration from a variety of sources: their own culture and traditions, as well as modern life. They use techniques, ideas, and imagery that date back to past centuries. In the images that you'll see below, you'll see these conventional methods almost "reinvented" by expressing more modern subjects and ideas. Doing this, in a way, "frees" the artists from Islamic patronage and functionality, as their predecessors were once constrained. The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) has been active in acquiring and preserving these pieces of contemporary Middle Eastern and Islamic art, believing that the art's relevance lies not simply as "art", but also as a means to explore the culture and...
Culture

Amazing first color photographs stored in Musee Albert-Khan in Paris

Albert Kahn was a rich French banker and lover of culture and art. At the first glance, he had a crazy vision. Apparently, he wanted to create a photographic “archive of the planet”. After seeing the photos below, you cannot disagree that he succeeded in his mission. Kahn traveled the world and collected 72,000 photographs. He was a philanthropist and his interest in other peoples' lives is easily visible on the photos he collected. After visiting Greece, Macedonia, Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Norway, Sweden, Morocco, Egypt, Japan and 50 other countries, his collection is exhibited in Musee Albert-Khan in Paris. These photos are some of the first colored pictures made using the Lumière brothers’ innovative Autochrome process. Since most of the photos are from the Balkans, BBC made a documentary about the importance of these photographs. They are testimonials about the diversity of ethnical communities, identities expressed through...
Art

‘La La Land’ brings back music and life to Hollywood

The fact that Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling are starring in the movie isn't the only reason to see La La Land. Fans and critics alike are giving the film praise for bringing back the prestige of a good musical to Hollywood. Damien Chazelle's feel-good movie couldn't have come at a better time. With so many people feeling down because of political issues and generally negative news on TV 24/7, having something as fun and positive as La La Land definitely helps lift our spirits up. The cinematography is no joke, either. You definitely will get an overwhelming feeling of nostalgia - decades back where proper fashion and grooming made sense. The popping color of the film adds to its appeal, too. And don't think this is just another art film with good choreography and an impressive soundtrack. The film is generating a LOT of Oscar buzz. In fact, many share the opinion that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences could use a light-hearted musical break right about now. Many...
Art

Hobby between friends turns into promising magazine venture with eccentric prints

Introducing Buffalo Zine, the brainchild of Adrián González-Cohen (creative director) and David Uzquiza (graphic designer, art director). The two men were friends since 1999 when they met as students. Over the years, their friendship led to one of the most fascinating magazine ventures of today. Buffalo Zine is a totally hands-on process. Each issue is made from scratch and takes years to complete. In fact, the two artists did not think that they would be publishing at all. It simply was a humble hobby shared between the two of them. After producing thousands of copies, they decided to distribute... and the rest was history. Now on its fourth issue, copies of Buffalo Zine can be bought online. It follows a classic newspaper format - one that is almost extinct in our modern and digital age. What once was kept in the garage is now a real and flourishing venture between childhood friends. /...
Art

Designer gives ‘dead’ books new life, rejuvenates the print industry

Ben Pieratt is a designer and the man behind "Dead Bookstore". It sounds grim, but it is more of a breath of new life instead of just death. The bookstore's concept is something new. It is filled with prints - not books. Pieratt works but cutting old books through their original stitching. He lays them flat to spread them out and chooses the most interesting juxtaposition of spreads. It sounds simple enough, but the end results are actually amazing. All of the works are available on Pieratt's website, where they can be purchased. Alternatively, he also teaches anyone how to make such spreads - for free. The inspiration behind this project is the need to reconcile the almost-dead print form with the digital media of today. Dead Bookstore is his way of doing just this. He believes that our culture and history has relied so much on print, that all people must have the chance to find it in one way or another. Plus, he is proud that this is something anybody can do on their own. The process...
Art

LA County Museum of Art to host exhibit works from Picasso and apprentice Diego Rivera

Pablo Picasso had a friendly relationship with fellow painter Diego Rivera. The latter was a younger artist from Mexico at the time, and he had spent a lot of time discovering Europe. He even lived in Paris for many years. Picasso and Rivera were neighbors at one point. The two artists will be the painters of focus for the next exhibition hosted by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). This exhibit will highlight the two artists' lives, how Picasso acquired a still life painting by Rivera - and what he got in return; their experiments with various painting techniques and art materials; and how they both reenvisioned representational painting in their unique ways. The exhibit is called “Picasso and Rivera: Conversations Across Time” and will be sponsored by Christie's auctions. Tickets and admission are free for members all year long. More details on the exhibit are posted on the official event page from the LACMA website. ...
Art

Seeing the best of representative painting at Art Basel Miami Beach

Many detest the Art Basel events in Miami Beach, claiming them to be overly commercialized and expensive. Audiences who are able to see past that, however, might find that it is worth going on a trip for - especially if you're only ever concerned about the actual art. The show will feature the works of various artists from around the globe. These artists use all kinds of media, but painting seems to be among the more prevalent ones. To be precise, "representational painting" is a huge trend for this year's event. More than paintings, fans of film, art installations, sculptures, and even magazine collectors will find something interesting. The event is also a prime spot for critics and collectors from all around the world. Considered as the premier art fair in the US, the exhibit is expecting a total of 70,000 visitors this year. ...
Architecture

Before Google: the lost art of real estate maps

Remember when everything was much simpler? There was a time when we did not rely on technology or the internet. There was no Google to give us instant results for every single thing that we need. This included maps. These days, you can simply take your phone and type in a place and you'll get an instant map on your screen. It's impossible to get lost as long as you have cellular coverage. This is a nice moment to look back at the simplicity of the past. Even though it was a lot less convenient, it can't be helped to feel nostalgic and eerily proud of how talented manual labor is. Men and women actually drew maps using their bare hands. Just ink on paper. No fancy software and digital tools to help them out. Minneapolis is a great case in point. Its nice aerial views of buildings, streets, and highways are best appreciated when seen through these old school real estate maps. It's no bluff that these, in their own humble ways, are real pieces of art. ...
Art

Pictures show the decaying beauty of forgotten places

Matthias Haker is a German urban explorer and freelance photographer with a keen eye. He finds derelict corners of the world, with no restoration projects going on to preserve their former glory, and captures the nostalgic beauty that haunts them. Looking at his pictures with saturated colors and enriching details makes you feel you're looking at the memory of the place that once was, not the ruin that's left. The location of these abandoned places is kept in secret in order to prevent them from being vandalized. Enjoy more of his work on his website, Facebook, or DeviantArt ...
Creativity

Meet the brilliance of Orhan Pamuk’s Museum of Innocence

"Tell me, does love make one a fool or only fool falls in love?" Orhan Pamuk is the best known Turkish, Nobel prize-winning writer. His style of narrating and the imagination are far from ordinary. In 2015, Orhan Pamuk went even further in his artistic exploration and created a museum based on his book “The museum of innocence”. The book came first and then Pamuk decided to embody the imagination in a brilliant way. In the museum visitors can see and feel everything that imaginary characters Fusun and Kemal touched for nine years. The collection includes jewellery, underwear, earrings, dresses, and hundreds of cigarette ends. The museum was announced as the winner of the 2014 European Museum of the Year Award. In 2015, a director Grant Gee made a film “Innocence of memories” based on Orhan Pamuk’s book. For more details check the museum’s official website. ...
Fashion

Recreating traditional Ukrainian headdresses

Maysternya Treti Pivni (Ukr. Майстерня Треті Півні) is a collective of photographers, stylists, makeup artists, and promoters. In celebration of traditional Ukrainian culture, the group has staged photo shoots that recreate authentic, traditional attire of the country. The images show outstanding floral headdresses and crowns, exquisite embroidered textiles, collections of beaded jewelry, and the smiling faces of women who are celebrating their culture. The photos, while steeped in tradition, also feel fresh and contemporary. There is no artifice of old-fashioned; instead the photos show the traditional dress with vibrancy. ...
Sculpture

A graphic designer takes her letter love into 3D with typographic sculptures

Alabama-based artist June Corley worked as an advertising art director and graphic designer for many years doing what she called “playing with type”. Continuing her affinity for letter forms and bringing her play-space into three-dimensions, Corley now creates typographic sculptures. In her work, we see how vintage signage and discarded letterpress type can be transformed into playful characters. The curve of a “D” becomes the belly of a bird, and the prongs of an “E” become legs. This body of work began when Corley moved from Atlanta to a cabin in Alabama and was inspired by a chaotic stack of her collected vintage signs.        ...
Industrial design

Design history: 110 years since the Wright brothers’ Flying Machine

It’s been 110 years since the Wright brothers were awarded a U.S. patent for their Flying Machine invention. In celebration, a special document display will be hosted by the National Archives Museum in Washington, D.C. Although a display of paperwork may not seem to be noteworthy or exciting, these patent files have been missing since 1979 when they were loaned out to commemorate the 75th anniversary. The paperwork was just recently rediscovered following a targeted search. The found documents had been misfiled in the wrong box, a major problem when the organization has more than 107,600 cubic feet of patent files. The photos and patent paperwork below are from the collections of the National Archives. ...
Art

Huichol ancestral art meets Star Wars

Álvaro Ortiz López-Puwari, is a Wixarika artist from the Sierra Madre Occidental in Jalisco, México.  He is one of the Huichol, native Mexicans who proud of their roots, and work to keep their ancient language, culture and traditions alive. One of these traditions is their beaded art, that through generations has preserved their symbolism and folkloric patterns, which are used to represent and communicate with the gods. PUWARI HELMETS is a collection of this ancient art applied to various helmets and masks. It mixes inspiration from both traditions from a long time ago, and those from a galaxy far, far away. If you would like to see more, check out his Facebook page. ...
Creativity

Darwin’s kids used his famous manuscript as a coloring book

The handwritten manuscript of Charles Darwin’s “On the Origin of Species” was not well-preserved. Of the 700 plus pages of the manuscript, only about 45 of them still exist today. These pages were not saved for their written words, but for their drawings that were done by some of Darwin’s 10 children. “Darwin was done with those pages — he was throwing away sections of his draft and not caring about it because the book was published,” says the American Museum of Natural History Darwin Manuscripts Project Director, David Kohn. Thanks to this vintage refrigerator art that was preserved by a proud father, we still have a few of the pages. ...
Digital

Subjects in classic art pieces reimagined with tattoos

Advertising art director Nicolas Amiard has reimagined the appearances of the subjects of some of the most classic paintings. In his series “The Art of Tattoo”, Amiard has added some colorful ink to some of these famous pieces of art. Using Photoshop, he adds tribal designs, floral patterns, words and Japanese-style scenes. If you didn’t know any better, you might think these were part of the original paintings because of his seamless editing. Check out more of Amiard’s work on his Behance page. ...
Video

Triangle waltz: vintage animation is mesmerizing

Using triangles in approximately 300 different arrangements, the 1966 short film Notes on a Triangle still holds up today for its simple beauty. Animator René Jodoin shows triangles move and dance with one another, dividing and twirling in a math demonstration that we wish they has shown us in school. With only one form in three colors, this 5-minute long geometric ballet is set to an instrumental composition by composed by Maurice Blackburn and was produced by the National Film Board of Canada. ...
Vintage

Massive collection of vintage image projectors

40 years ago, Richard Balzer stumbled upon a vintage image projector called a “magic lantern”, and was inspired by its intricacy as an early optical device. Over all these years, Balzer has collected hundreds of vintage optical devices from camera obscuras and praxinoscopes to anamorphic mirrors and zoetropes. One of the most unique devices in his collection across is the phenakistoscope which uses a disc laden with sequential illustrations. When viewed through slits in a mirror, it produces looping animations not unlike GIF images nowadays. Check out some of the trippy animations below, and head on over to Balzer’s Tumblr for more! ...
Sculpture

Elegant Dongyang wood carvings from the famed Tang Dynasty

The Tang Dynasty is one of the oldest in Chinese history and is supposed to have existed around the year 700. The craft of Dongyang wood carving was born out of the Tang Dynasty in Dongyang, China and is regarded by experts to be one of the most beautiful carving styles in the world. Dongyang carving appears everywhere, sometimes as ornate features on cabinet faces, tables, and desks. Other times on large wooden panels which resemble modern-day murals. The craft is still practiced today around the globe and has taken on various detailed and intricate forms. Check out some of them below. You can also find more examples on websites like Lustik, Orientally Yours, Michael Lai, and XDYMD.COM. ...
Graphic Design

Amazing side by side comparison of magazine covers in the last 100 years

A simple study of magazine covers through the ages can reveal startling information about the drastic changes we’ve undergone both on an artistic and social level. That’s exactly what Karen X. Cheng and Jerry Gabra have tackled in their recent feature called, “Evolution of Magazine Covers“. Collecting issues of popular magazines like Cosmopolitan, Time, Vogue etc. Cheng and Gabra have compiled a number of side-by-side comparison that make it very easy to see the contrast between fonts, color palettes, headings, and images. The Evolution of Magazine Covers spans nearly 100 years and makes for a great study of how men and women were depicted throughout the ages including notes like, “Vogue has had some gorgeous covers throughout the years… They’ve added more text on their covers to lure readers in, to put everything into perspective.” Check out some of the comparisons below and click here to view the full gallery. ...
Creativity

Outlandish taxidermy artist invents curious creature combinations

A recently published book, 'Walter Potter's Curious World of Taxidermy,' showcases a selection of Walter Potter’s fantasy creations. As a self-taught taxidermist in the late 1800s, his work showed great whimsy and experimentation that included scenes of rabbit schoolchildren, cigar-smoking squirrels, and kitten tea parties. His collection of pieces was housed under the title Mr. Potter's Museum of Curiosities until the museum closed in the 1970s. The collection was auctioned off in 2003 when it caught the eye of renowned artist Damien Hirst who has said, “I've known about Mr Potter's for years. We used to take the kids up to see it all the time because they loved it. They had that sense of wonderment - you could see they were fascinated but repelled at the same time.” ...
Funny

Hilarious recreations of over-the-top romance novel covers

The covers of most romance novels are over the top, to say the least. Men and women in ridiculous poses, with ridiculously-flawless bodies don the covers of these novels on the shelves of your local bookstore, grocery store, or discount store. While this kind of book art has obviously worked for decades, they're still laughable to many. To that end, Cosmopolitan magazine has recreated ten famous covers with real, un-retouched people. The results really bring to light just how absurd many of these covers would be if you saw the same things in real life. It also highlights just how unrealistic the expectations these novels set forth actually are. ...
Retro

People from the 1900s transformed into alien creatures

Colin Batty is a talented artist from Manchester, England, best known for his countless artistic contributions to the world of legendary movies, contributing to Alien, Mars Attacks, The Sandman and others. Although Batty is best known for his sculpture, the artist has also published a huge set of cabinet cards from 1900s, modified with his own dark and humorous elements. Those additions or strange mutations look very natural and flow seamlessly with the colors and shades of each image. Batty has an impressive talent to create creepy, but very delightful pieces of art. His works are ideal adornments for any unusual places like horror amusement parks, dark art galleries or, cabinets of curiosities. ...
Funny

Intriguing silent movie etiquette slides reveal daily-life in 1912

We all love going to the movies, but it is a pity when this magical cinema experience is spoiled by others who do not care for etiquette. Back in 1912, however, when the movies were still silent, they knew how to deal with bad behavior in style! New York designers John D. Scott and Edward Van Altena created a series of slides in the early 1900's that were a humorous visual guide for how to behave in the movies. Those slides were put in fancy carved frames and shown in cinemas. This is how movie-goers got educated not to talk loud, wear huge hats, or just walk around in the middle of the film. Today, we still face similar problems with inconsistent behavior in cinemas. John D. Scott and Edward Van Altena show us how to deal with the problems in a communicative, yet entertaining way. ...
Art

Thanksgiving plates imagine the bizarre eating habits of famous artists

Whether you're picky or porky, we all have a way of filling our plates at Thanksgiving. It’s the power of repetition, I suppose, and we’ve all been working on it since we were tikes, barely able to see over the turkey. So it makes you wonder… “How did Van Gogh fill his plate on Thursday?” Well I didn’t, but San Francisco-based artist Hannah Rothstein did, and went about recreating those turkey feasts through the eyes of some very famous artists. Tackling greats from Warhol to Pollock, Rothstein recreated their meals with an artist’s flair. Although it would have been nice to see Rothstein change up the food and go a bit further with place settings and environment, each plate transcends food and becomes fun and edible art. Jackson Pollock René Magritte Pablo Picasso Piet Mondrian Andy Warhol Mark Rothko Georges Seurat Vincent van Gogh ...
Video

The lovable Moomins comic gets its big screen debut

'Moomins on the Riviera' is a hand-drawn animated film featuring the Moomins, the celebrated cult comic strip from Tove Jansson. The Moomins comic strip was first published in 1945, and their stories have been adapted for TV in the past, but this is the first feature film with the family. The style of the film stays true to Jansson's original drawings, while offering up a story aimed at teaching us all how to appreciate the little things in life. The coloring of the film is remarkable, inspired by vintage posters from the French Riviera in the 1950s, and includes a surprisingly yellow sea (along with the rest of the water in the film). It's a neat take, and one that sets the look of the film apart. ...
Photography

12 Polaroid photos by Andy Warhol featuring movie stars (and some fruit)

Arnold Schwarzenegger, O.J. Simpson, Mick Jagger, Yoko Ono - These famous faces and others were all immortalized in Polaroid photos by infamous pop-artist Andy Warhol. And though there are many photographs with recognizable faces, there are others such as 'Still Life with Bananas,' a photo of Santa Claus, or a pig portrait, which are not a brush with fame. Instead, these images are indicative of Warhol’s widespread creativity and curious eye. The technology of Polaroid photography was just coming into fashion in the 1970s when these shots were taken. See the full set of 85 of Warhol’s Polaroid portraits at the website These Americans. ...
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