Category: Unique

Art

Tokyo-based barista brings coffee art to a whole new level

Kazuki Yamamoto is a Japanese barista who takes his latte art very seriously. While it has been common practice for cafes to decorate their goodness-in-a-cup before serving as if coffee in itself is not enticing enough, Yamamoto took the whole artisan latte to a whole new level. He creates 3D sculptures in a cup, or across cups even. This 26-year-old latte artist uses a toothpick and a spoon to create these foamy artworks. It usually takes him 3 to 5 minutes to come up with a snap-worthy presentation. This skill brought 193,000 people to follow him on Twitter. While this is fun and a feast for the eyes of the spectators, a controversy started to surface in the coffee industry because of this. Some argue that too much effort and appreciation being given to the aesthetics of the coffee could mean less attention to more important matters like taste. Nonetheless, the Tokyo-based barista could not be bothered as he continues to wow his customers and even aims to open his own cafe...
Architecture

Massive Lego House set to open in popular brick toy’s hometown

Close to 60 years since the Lego brick was first designed and developed, the Lego company is still building up on its massive cross-generational popularity as it prepares to open a giant brick playhouse, called Lego House. And what better place to put up the structure, a 12,000-square-meter building, than the beloved toy's hometown of Billund in Denmark? A handiwork of architect Bjarke Ingels and opening in September, the building is designed to pay homage to the enduring popularity of the product. "Lego House will be the only one of its kind in the world and it will remain so, because Billund is the home of Lego and this is where we will always be," general manager Jesper Vilstrup told Reuters. Lego House will have a Lego store, four playgrounds, three restaurants, and a gallery that will exhibit Lego's history as well as fan-made Lego figures. Lego House will "display everything the Lego brick can do," Vilstrup said. ...
Art

Who knew we can do this to a sheet of A4?

Peter Callesen is a Denmark-born artist who has amazing skills when it comes to paper. Although he also creates art using another medium, he almost exclusively worked with white paper recently in different objects, paper cuts, installations, and performances. A large part of his work is made from A4 sheets of paper. According to him, "It is probably the most common and consumed media used for carrying information today. This is why we rarely notice the actual materiality of the A4 paper. By taking away all the information and starting from scratch using the blank white A4 paper sheet for my creations, I feel I have found a material that we are all able to relate to, and at the same time, the A4 paper sheet is neutral and open to fill with different meaning. The thin white paper gives the paper sculptures a frailty that underlines the tragic and romantic theme of my works." For more of Peter's work, visit his website and Facebook. ...
Culture

Nomadic life of tight-knit community, Irish Travellers, captured in photographs

Meeting new people is one thing. Meeting a group of closed-off, extremely private nomads is another. Deep in the countryside of Ireland resides a group of families known as one of Ireland’s ethnic minorities. The community, known as the Irish Travellers, resides in their respective caravans and lives a life detached from modern necessities and technology. Brite Kaufmann, a German photographer, saw these camps on one of her trips with friends. She developed so much curiosity for their culture that she bought and drove her own caravan to one of the camps, and stayed with the group for four years. These families face discrimination, even if the Irish government tries to embed them in the city. Their concept of gender roles is deeply rooted that Kaufmann, a female who drove on her own, first became a kind of a novelty to the community. Following tradition is strict in this nomad group, which means that only men work and women care for the children. The Irish Travellers trusted...
Architecture

World’s narrowest house in Poland is not for the claustrophobic

As the problem of living space progresses into the lack thereof, developers have now started building vertically in place of the traditional construction. As an answer to the crisis, a 46 square-feet art installation nicknamed “cushion of air” now resides in Poland and is being dubbed today as the world’s narrowest house. The Keret House, created by Poland-based architect Jakub Szczęsny, is sandwiched between two buildings in Warsaw. It is 30 feet tall by 28 inches wide and boasts a bedroom, bathroom, kitchen and a refrigerator inside its three floors. The house is so skinny, having only a ladder as its entrance, that it does not carry any electrical or plumbing lines. In place, an innovative water closet was designed and electricity acquired from the two buildings where it is wedged between. The house was named after Isreali author Etgar Keret, also its first tenant, as a memorial to the family he lost during the Holocaust. The Keret House does not meet Polish...
Art

Matthew J. Levin’s fantastical and eerie sculptures that will hunt your dreams

Matthew J. Levin is a sculptor and concept designer based in Los Angeles, California. To quote the Mexican film director, screenwriter, producer, and novelist Guillermo del Toro: “Mr. Levin’s portraiture is both quirky and mesmerizing. Each of his little sculptural sketches becomes a three-dimensional snapshot of the bizarre. Just as the eyes in a classical portrait are meant to “follow” you through the room, so will these disquieting Homunculi.” His love for this art started when he moved to Los Angeles in 2008 to work as a digital sculptor. A year later, he chanced upon a box of Super Sculpey, a unique polymer clay, and that's when the affair began. Since then, his work has been shown on TV, displayed in different galleries, and commissioned by film directors like del Toro, among others. To know more about this artist and to see more of his sculptures, visit his website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Art

More than 35 artists contributed for strange cutlery collection that slows down people’s eating

Spoons and forks forged from wrenches, tongs, and scissors are just a few of the absurd utensils shown on Steinbeisser’s annual food and design event. The Amsterdam-based design studio curated cutlery inventions from more than 35 different designers and artists for the Experimental Gastronomy collection. The strange-looking creations were commissioned by the studio to slow down the time which people normally spend eating. Martin Kullik, the founder of Steinbeisser, reportedly said the results of the show were “very interesting” and that the extra time spent on chewing helped “contribute to enhancing the taste experience.” World-renowned designers contributed their unique works for the show. Estonian artist Nils Hint made oversized utensils using recycled tools from junk yards all over Estonia. Dutch designers Lisanne van Zanten and Renee Boute, however, experimented with the taste of the food itself. They used colored cutlery for their contribution:...
Art

Artist breathes new life into found objects by placing them in unrelated drawings

Have you ever found yourself seeing or regarding something as an entirely different, and much bigger, thing? Neuroscience PhD student and artist Desirée De León most certainly has, and her online project "100 Days of Tiny Things" sprang right out of an instance in which she gave life to a found object by treating it in a way that only someone with artistic inclinations would. “I remember noticing the disembodied head on the coins,” she says, “and I impulsively drew a speech bubble coming out of the coin’s mouth.” De León's series is a collection of minuscule objects that she has put a spin on and, thus, given a new existence to by situating them in drawings that point to an entirely different context. One work features a real orange segment that took on the image of the sun after De León drew a tree and giraffes beside it. Another work shows a dried flower heading in the direction of a drawing of dinosaurs, suggesting that it was the asteroid that killed the creatures....
Art

Artist makes amazing portraits by gluing bits of junk together, forming incredible images in the process

Zac Freeman graduated cum laude from his degree of Fine Arts at Jacksonville University, Florida in 1997. What might seem to be useless for others, this Florida-based artist turns into a thing of beauty. He creates artworks made entirely of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. He started collecting these materials in 1999. He glues the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. His art communicates through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. He values the importance of incorporating actual object or junk in the finished product as he believes it carries energy in itself. Freeman's work has been commissioned for use in commercials for Absolut Vodka. In 2010, he won the Art Chicago award and has been exhibited at major art fairs in London, Miami, Chicago, Toronto, Houston and the Hamptons, New York. To get...
Design

Smart prototype “Spector” identifies hues and fonts with a click

For web designers and artists alike, inspiration can come from the most unexpected moments. You might encounter a hue you see as something fitting for an interior project or a suitable font for a web page while browsing through a magazine or reading a book. Only, you don’t have your computer or your swatches with you and the best thing you can do is take a photo for future reference. And they don’t always end up looking the same. The frustration that colors and fonts “never looks like it does on screen as it does in the finalized print” is exactly the reason behind UK designer Fiona O’Leary’s device. With the help of interaction designer David van Gemeran, she created “Spector” – a smart device that quickly identifies fonts and hues with a single click. The innovative prototype can store up to 20 references at once which can be transferred to a computer – a total designer’s dream. According to O’Leary, the device can further provide “other details...
Art

The coolest PR firm in the entire world, Freuds, is beaming chock full of art

Have you ever wanted to work in a "cool" office? I bet that you have. Well, if you are any one of the employees in the London-based PR firm Freuds, then you're probably pretty contented with your workplace. As it turns out, this seemingly regular office from the outside is filled with eccentric and vintage artwork inside. The firm was founded by Matthew Freud (yes, he is related to Sigmund Freud). Once you get inside, you'll find everything from dinosaur remains to motorbikes to paintings to vintage furniture. There's an Obama painting, as well as art pieces by Banksy and Damien Hirst. When you view the office from the Fitzrovia side street where it is situated, you would never for a second mistake it to be uber exciting indoors. Whether you're in need of public relations services or not, you will surely want to take a peep inside their unusual offices. ...
Art

HoloLens will bring together artworks and buyers in mixed reality at The Armory Show 2017

Do you want to know how a painting looks on your wall before you even bring it home? Do you wish to pore over different artworks in a gallery without actually being there? The Armory Show can make that possible. Online art resource Artsy is teaming up with Microsoft this year to mount the fifth iteration of the annual art fair in order to bring a mixed-reality experience to art lovers and collectors. Happening at Piers 92/94 in New York from March 2 to 5, The Armory Show will bring works by different artists to buyers with the help of technological innovations, particularly Microsoft's HoloLens, touted to be world's first self-contained holographic computer. "By bringing art online and experimenting with the latest technology, including VR/AR, Artsy connects a global network of collectors and art enthusiasts to art from thousands of galleries, museums, auction houses and art fairs located around the world," said Elena Soboleva, Artsy's curator of special projects. ...
Architecture

SXSW 2017 to showcase enthralling installations under new art program

South by Southwest has indeed grown so much from its beginnings in 1987. Evidence of that is its upcoming exhibition of five art installations under the new SXSW Art Program, which launches in March, during the conglomerate's music and film festivals and conferences for this year. Both budding and known artists will take part in the program. Among them is Los Angeles-based artist Refik Anadol, whose work titled "Infinity Room" will be showcased. The work is made up of a space that transforms a beholder's view of reality into a "three-dimensional space of visualization." Speaking of the new program, SXSW chief programming officer Hugh Forrest said, "Art and Design [have] always been central to the SXSW ethos, and we have quickly become a recognized platform for visual artists to showcase art installations and connect with filmmakers, musicians, and technologists. The Art Program is the first time we have formalized the program and sought leading artists to design...
Architecture

From the young boy in the backyard to “rattan’s first virtuoso”

A multi-awarded furniture designer and manufacturer from Cebu, Philippines, Kenneth Cobonpue made a name both in the local and international for his unique designs and roster of clientele that include names such as Queen Sophia of Spain and Brad Pitt.  Cobonpue’s trademark is the integration of locally sourced materials with innovative handmade production processes. His craft is recognized by different award-giving bodies around the globe like the American Society of Interior Design and French Coup de Couer to name a few. His designs have also appeared in films, music videos, and US TV series. In 2007, Kenneth was named by TIME magazine as “rattan’s first virtuoso”. Kenneth was born in a Chinese family and was initially encouraged by his father to take up a business course. But his love for designing was developed at an early age when he used to play with various materials and create furniture pieces at his mother’s backyard factory. Although he followed...
Art

Sculptor uses matchsticks and hangers to create large scale installations

David Mach is a Scottish sculptor and installation artist known for his dynamic and imaginative large-scale collages, sculptures, and installations using diverse media like coat hangers, matches, and magazines, among others. The Scotsman, a local online newspaper, describes his work as "big on gesture and big on proportion, it demands your attention and gets it". Many of his installations are temporary and constructed in public spaces. He studied arts and specialized on sculpture at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design. He chose this art because he considered it to be the most demanding, physically and intellectually. He first had his solo exhibition in 1982 at the Lisson Gallery in London. You can say The Scotsman is right. His huge presentations got the world's attention and quickly established his reputation. That exhibition was followed by countless international exposure. In his matchhead series, Mach re-imagines portraits using the colored...
Interior Design

Paper sculptures refresh the eyes with kaleidoscopic color palette

Jen Stark is an artist who creates intricate sculptures made of paper. Her pieces often remind the audience of kaleidoscope visions because of the bright colors. Born in Miami, Florida in 1983, Jen currently lives and works in Los Angeles. She got her Arts degree from Maryland Institute College of Art. She majored in fibers and minored in animation. Her artworks are three-dimensional pieces which take the paper to a whole new level of sculpture. Since the process of making her pieces are very tedious, she hired a few assistants to help her. It usually takes her a few days to a couple of months to complete a piece depending on the size and complexity. The largest project she has done so far is a mural and a sculpture she made for a mall in Chicago. For more of her work, visit her website or follow her social media accounts, Facebook and Instagram. ...
Art

Ron Mueck’s perturbing hyperrealist sculptures on view at Houston’s Museum of Fine Arts

Ron Mueck's works in the last two decades have been relatively few and far between, with only a little more than three dozen completed hyperrealist sculptures making up his oeuvre thus far. This sparseness, however, hasn't kept the Australian artist, who now works in the UK from becoming someone of great renown. That's bound to happen if one has a body of work that's evocative and perturbing as his are. Consisting of tiny and huge sculptures of mostly people (ranging from infants to the elderly ) that warrant a second look for confirmation of their inanimateness, Mueck's works have been in and out of museums around the world. Now, 13 of his sculptures will be on view at Houston's Museum of Fine Arts, after having spent time in museums in Paris, Sao Paolo and other cities. The exhibit will open on Feb. 25 and will run until May. You can view some of Mueck's hyperrealist sculptures below. ...
Art

My Heart is an Animal by Katarzyna and Marcin Owczarek

My Heart is an Animal is an ongoing photography project based on surrealistic imagery. It is made by photographer couple, Katarzyna and Marcin Owczarekwho, currently live and work in Belgium. The couple started working together in 2015. Katarzyna is a fashion/product designer and has a Master's degree in Arts while Marcin has been into photography since he was 20. Their brainchild, My Heart is an Animal, put their passion for digital photography to a whole new level when it was launched in 2016. It brings the viewers to the world of dreams, symbols, metaphors, allegories, legends, and myths. The process of hybridizing human and animal bodies is a rare kind of art that captures the audience's emotion regarding humanity, its power, passion, and state of mind. The couple aims to explore the infinite possibilities of human imagination, in search of a connection between reality and otherwise. Visit their website or follow them on Facebook and Instagram. ...
Art

French artist Abraham Poincheval will live inside a boulder for a week to ‘see what is really happening’

French artist Abraham Poincheval has in recent years been known for living inside a bear sculpture for 13 days. In a new performance art, the artist is doing it again, locking himself up in a stone block in which he will stay for a planned seven days. Poincheval entered the stone on Feb. 22 and will come out on March 1. Living inside an object is a way of understanding the nature of that object, the artist told journalists before embarking on his endeavor, taking place at Paris' Palais de Tokyo contemporary art museum. For him, it is in fact the superior way of comprehending. "I say to myself, hold on, what is this object really? And you ask yourself the question and say to yourself: 'Well, hold on, instead of distancing yourself and removing oneself from it, let's go inside and see what is really happening,'" Poincheval said. While inside the boulder, whose space within is patterned after the position of a seated person, Poincheval will subsist on stewed fruit, soups and purees....
Art

Jan Cieslikiewicz confronts our discomfort with the random and uncertain with new photo series

"Null Hypothesis," a new series by Polish photographer Jan Cieslikiewicz, bears the trappings of scientific thought. The series takes its title from the name of a hypothesis which posits that the connection between two phenomena is random, unless a scientist proves that it is not at all and is therefore calculable. Considering that Cieslikiewicz went to Harvard to study mathematics and subsequently worked as a Wall Street trader, the theme -- or, more to the point, the thrust --- of "Null Hypothesis" isn't surprising. The photos in the series each show what appear to be unrelated or contradictory components, and it is with this disjunction that Cieslikiewicz seeks to confront viewers regarding their thoughts on and reactions to life's random events and uncertainties. "I don’t think humanity as a whole can accept and genuinely come to terms with fundamental randomness and uncertainty," the photographer says in a statement accompanying the series. "Accepting...
Design

Two teenagers just solved your ice cream cone problems and it is delicious!

Fact: Ice cream can melt. And unless you’re a serious napkin hoarder or savage enough to lick those trickling lines of gooey sweetness, you’re at risk of getting yourself spoiled. Luckily for you ice cream lovers, 14-year-olds Oliver Greenwald and Sam Nassif from Colorado have provided an effective, yummy solution to your ice cream problems. The Drip Drop, an edible ring made out of waffle ingredients, is an ingenious idea conceived by the youngsters at an amazing age of 10. It’s basically a ring that catches any ice cream drips which you can easily slide onto the cone – and it comes in two flavors: Original and Chocolate. The two teenage designers already won 2nd place at the Gates Invention competition for the design and have scored a U.S. Design Patent just last 2015. Oliver and Sam believe that with the use of the delectable Drip Drops, people can forego using napkins and in turn save “approximately one million trees” every year. ...
Architecture

Urban farming prototype Growroom appeared in Copenhagen’s 2016 Chart Art Fair

Growroom, an artistic project made to answer the demands of urban farming, was seen in Copenhagen’s 5th CHART ART FAIR held at the heart of the city. The art event, staged in central Charlottenborg, was established in 2013 with the concept of challenging “the boundaries and experience of a traditional art fair.” Designed by the collaborative community of Space10, Growroom is the first pocket farm of its kind to provide urban solutions for the growing problems of sustainability and demand for fresh produce. With “food producing architecture” in mind, lead architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum designed the spherical greenhouse to enable users to plant and harvest greens and herbs using the built-in plant boxes. It is transportable and compact in size that can transform it into both an artistic display and a food haven in one. Similar to all their other innovative projects, the “future-living lab and exhibition space” Space10’s main purpose...
Art

Apple project manager turned artist made new knots each day for a year

Windy Chien devoted a year to learn a new knot everyday. From January of 2016 to December 31st 2016, the artist learned how to make 366 unique knots. That's 366 knots out of 3,900 mentioned in Chien’s knot manual, The Ashley Book of Knots. What's amazing is that it took its authors nearly 11 years to compile that instructional book. Talk about dedication! Windy Chien was formerly employed as a project manager at Apple and found the knot-learning daily ritual to be meditative as well as informative. Check out some of the knots below and find more on her website and Instagram. ...
Art Creativity Photography Design Sculpture Funny Illustration Inspiration Video Digital Graphic Design Industrial design Architecture Painting Fashion Technology Street art Furniture News Retro Interior Design Culture Vintage Nature Music Artwork Performance Typography Cute Logo design Unique Books Animation Food and Beverage Textile Web design Paper Sponsored Underwater