Category: Textile

Art

The Frick Museum: premier destination for Old Master paintings and European sculptures

The Frick Museum boasts of amazing art collections, from paintings to sculptures and other decorative pieces. It has made its place as one of the most globally renowned museums and research centers. It all began when Henry Clay Frick started collecting art pieces. From 1849 to 1919, the Pittsburgh industrialist gathered the best pieces of the era. Today, his Fifth Avenue house is one of the very few Gilded Age mansions left standing. The residence is a nice escape from the real world, providing a tranquil and serene milieu to its visitors. You can find amazing art by popular names such as Bellini, Rembrandt, Vermeer, Gainsborough, Goya, and Whistler. Since it opened its doors in 1935, and long after Henry Frick died, the museum has continued to acquire important pieces of art. On top of its collections, there are also concert series, lectures, education programs, and symposia that are held here, all of which promote the appreciation of vintage art. Here are some sample...
Art

‘Memorial Stitches’ artist creates embroidered heirlooms that are seamless, even without formal training

Carrie Violet of Memorial Stitches studied both fashion design and illustration. Because of this, it makes most sense that embroidery becomes second nature to her as it allows her to apply both skills seamlessly. Although she did not have any formal embroidery training, her style never stopped improving until her works became a flawless tactile version of what is normally a paint on canvas and pen on paper for other artists. Carrie is from North of England and her pieces are inspired by the Victorian era, particularly the aesthetics and mood of that time in history. She describes her style as delicate, dark, and ethereal. Aside from Victorian sentimentality, she has repeated doing several themes like locks of hair, dainty hands, or love notes. Most of her works are purchased as an heirloom, wall decor, or a memorial piece. For more of her amazing works, visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Creativity

This designer creates exquisite costumes and headdresses for the stage

Agnieszka Osipa, 30, is a designer of headdresses and stage costumes. She was born in Nowa Sarzyna, a small town in southeastern Poland. Based on her works alone, it is obvious that she's a master of doing designs and actually creating them. Because of this, she has the rare advantage of transforming her stellar ideas to real masterpieces to the delight of the client, the wearer, the photographer, or whoever sees her works. She draws influence from music. She prefers to listen to dark folklore, ambient pagan, and folk metal which, needless to say, is the reason her pieces have the same dark appeal. One notable favorite material that she uses is leather due to its armory vibe. Some of the basic processes she does are leatherwork, sewing, and beading. Interestingly, this artist is not a fan of showing herself to public. So let's just feast on her art, shall we? Visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Art

Artist uses fastfood paper bags to send a message to viewers

Don't we all like it when artists are witty enough to use their craft to send a message? In his project Notice-Forest (What Victory Tastes Like) in 2012, Okinawa-born artist Yuken Teruya sent quite a message using mainly fast-food paper bags. This New York-based artist started this Notice-Forest movement in 2005. On his website, he explained: "In my Notice-Forest series, a tree stands inside either paper bags or shopping bags. While it seems like the bag is holding the fragile tree inside, the bag actually combines with the tension of the tree to hold the bag up. It is a microcosm of the initial tree’s strength. The trees are “portraits,” with each referencing a specific, existing tree from a photograph." It's noticeable how Teruya uses commonplace materials to make his art relatable. His intention is to remind his viewers to slow down from their busy lives to experience and appreciate even the little things. This artist has a lot of other interesting works on his...
Interior Design

Paper sculptures refresh the eyes with kaleidoscopic color palette

Jen Stark is an artist who creates intricate sculptures made of paper. Her pieces often remind the audience of kaleidoscope visions because of the bright colors. Born in Miami, Florida in 1983, Jen currently lives and works in Los Angeles. She got her Arts degree from Maryland Institute College of Art. She majored in fibers and minored in animation. Her artworks are three-dimensional pieces which take the paper to a whole new level of sculpture. Since the process of making her pieces are very tedious, she hired a few assistants to help her. It usually takes her a few days to a couple of months to complete a piece depending on the size and complexity. The largest project she has done so far is a mural and a sculpture she made for a mall in Chicago. For more of her work, visit her website or follow her social media accounts, Facebook and Instagram. ...
Art

Ali Harrison makes amazing hand-cut paper art

Ali Harrison is the founder of Light & Paper and the success of her art has an interesting back story. On her website, Ali shared how one fateful day in December when, in search of a unique Christmas gift, she decided to try a new craft. Using a borrowed box cutter and her kitchen cutting board, Ali created her first papercutting. After falling in love with cutting paper, she armed herself with a sharper blade and an actual cutting mat, and Light & Paper was born. At first, all Light & Paper items were hand-cut originals - but when it was near impossible to keep up with orders, Ali decided to begin lasercutting her designs. This success brought her to opening an online store and a physical shop in Toronto, Canada. Ali never considered herself as the artsy one. In fact, she admits being 100% self/internet-taught. To see more of her works, visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Art

Embroidered textile art gives “meticulous” a new meaning

Rachel Wright took fashion and textiles at Birmingham City University and finished both Bachelor and Master's degree there before starting up a business in 1994. Just a mere glimpse at her work says a lot about how passionate she is about embroidery. She takes inspiration from landscapes and cityscapes. Her favorite subjects are the sea, harbor towns, boats, and lighthouses. The shapes, colors, and details of these are then borrowed and echoed in delicately hand or machine embroidered fabric collages, using vibrant threads, worked onto papers and fabrics. The signature skies in her landscapes are often dramatic and expressive. Embroidery enables her to draw and paint using fabric and stitch as a medium. What makes her embroideries different is their striking colors which she uses to captivate and draw the viewer in. More than anything, her main goal is to delight the eyes of her audience. Aside from her website, you can learn more about Rachel Wright and her art...
Creativity

A whole community battles the heat with crochet

Marina Fernández Ramos is the Spanish artisan who created the project "Tejiendo La Calle" ( Knitting/crocheting the street). The project included a citizen intervention with volunteers from the community of Valverde de la Vera, a little town in Spain. They reused plastic from shopping bags, recycling them into crochet parasols (sunshades) hanging them all over the streets to fight the extreme heat of this last summer. This project just earned an award  for Design and citizen participation from the Bienal Iberoamericana de Diseño ( Iberoamerican Bienal of Design) ...
Art

Celebrate 150 years of Canadian hooked rugs from the Textile Museum

Entitled "HOME ECONOMICS: 150 years of Canadian Hooked Rugs", an event will look into the origins, creation, and social impact of hooked rugs. This form of folk art is unique to the Canadian culture. It has been a part of Canadian lifestyle for a century and a half. For many locals, it served as an opportunity to express their artistic side while supporting reusing and recycling of materials. It also became a means of livelihood for some. For these reasons, it holds a big importance in the identity of Canada as a community and an international region. The event will focus on iconic stories, images, and communities involved in the tradition of hooked rugs, featuring the works of various artists. The Textile Museum of Canada's archives, together with public and private collections, will provide the artwork. It will be curated by Shauna McCabe, Natalia Nekrassova, Sarah Quinton and Roxane Shaughnessy; and will be organized and circulated by the Textile Museum of Canada....
Art

The role of Art Deco in fashion and textile designs over the years

During its conception, Art Deco was the newest style of its kind while boasting of strong attachments to other art styles and periods. It nurtured elements but at the same time reacted and even turned away from others. It gets a lot of similarities from its predecessor, Art Nouveau, such as geometric forms, exotic elements, as well as multiple dimensions and perspectives. During the Art Deco period, a lot of attention was given to textile design. At the time, fashion was the second biggest industry in export and carried heavy importance in the recovering economies right after WWI. Furthermore, Art Deco associates the technological innovations of the machine age, carrying with it a tendency to lean towards the urban and industrial scenes, which are prevalent in the metallic color palettes and the clean ergonomic lines of vehicles and objects. All of these were seen clearly in the evolution of textile and fashion design. The images below show the evolution of Art Deco design....
Art

Remembering the defunct ‘Faux Museum’: a paradise for oddities and confusion

The Faux Museum was once the bread and butter of Tom Richards, its curator (and often, janitor). It was located in Portland, Oregon and contains a wild collection of knick knacks. Everything inside the museum was either created by Richards himself or his friends. Each displayed item is a representation of his eccentric imagination and sense of humor. Why the weirdness? He simply wants people to "not think too hard" and "see things differently". In this light, each piece is misleading by intention. In fact, the original plan was to make an entire museum as a prank, but Richards ended up pouring everything he had into it. As a result, he made tourists and locals amused (and usually, confused) as they pass by. There certainly is a big hole left by the Faux Museum as it leaves us in its wake. It said goodbye in 2015, and fans from all over are still hoping that it'll open its doors once again - in one way or another.  ...
Cute

Mini kimonos and dresses with geek inspiration

Amanda Marin is a designer from the USA with a very particular niche. In her own words, her creations are "Easy cosplay alternatives for cute enthusiasts!". As you can see, these adorable outfits are inspired in various fandoms and characters. Targeted mainly for otakus but suitable for any girl. This way they can embody their favorite male character, in a girly fashion. Since she does all the work herself, she is in high demand and only opens certain dates to accept orders. To see more of her cute designs visit her website, DeviantArt, Facebook or Instagram.          ...
Art

Adorable handmade animal characters created with fabulous felt

We've seen everyday objects represented with felt before but Cat Rabbit takes it to the next level with animals. The Melbourne-based textile artist creates everything from baby lambs to rabbits. Each piece is made by hand and is spot on. Her Etsy page is full of her felt creations and when she's not busy creating fabulous felt fabrications, Rabbit is busy working on illustrations for children’s storybooks featuring her felt characters. The stories are called Soft Stories and are made in collaboration with Rabbit's friend  Isobel Knowles. Check out some of the felt animals below and find more on her Instagram and Tumblr. ...
Art

Mutated rugs bridge ancient and moderns worlds with age-old weaving techniques

Ancient and modern worlds collide in Faig Ahmed's intricate carpet patterns. The artist's fascination with carpet patterns, particularly ones found on rugs originating in Turkey, Persia, India, and Caucasus, led him to produce unconventional designs. The carpets seem to drip, break apart, and pixelate over the walls they're suspended on. Utilizing age-old weaving techniques, Ahmed's rugs depict  the rare instances of finding symmetry in nature. The rugs have been featured in various places such as at the Museum of Fine Art Boston, and the Bellevue Art Museum. Check out some of his distorted rugs below and find more on his website. ...
Art Creativity Photography Design Sculpture Funny Illustration Inspiration Video Digital Graphic Design Industrial design Architecture Painting Fashion Technology Street art Furniture News Retro Interior Design Culture Vintage Nature Music Artwork Performance Typography Cute Logo design Books Unique Animation Food and Beverage Textile Web design Paper Sponsored Underwater