Category: Design

Art

More than 35 artists contributed for strange cutlery collection that slows down people’s eating

Spoons and forks forged from wrenches, tongs, and scissors are just a few of the absurd utensils shown on Steinbeisser’s annual food and design event. The Amsterdam-based design studio curated cutlery inventions from more than 35 different designers and artists for the Experimental Gastronomy collection. The strange-looking creations were commissioned by the studio to slow down the time which people normally spend eating. Martin Kullik, the founder of Steinbeisser, reportedly said the results of the show were “very interesting” and that the extra time spent on chewing helped “contribute to enhancing the taste experience.” World-renowned designers contributed their unique works for the show. Estonian artist Nils Hint made oversized utensils using recycled tools from junk yards all over Estonia. Dutch designers Lisanne van Zanten and Renee Boute, however, experimented with the taste of the food itself. They used colored cutlery for their contribution:...
Art

‘Memorial Stitches’ artist creates embroidered heirlooms that are seamless, even without formal training

Carrie Violet of Memorial Stitches studied both fashion design and illustration. Because of this, it makes most sense that embroidery becomes second nature to her as it allows her to apply both skills seamlessly. Although she did not have any formal embroidery training, her style never stopped improving until her works became a flawless tactile version of what is normally a paint on canvas and pen on paper for other artists. Carrie is from North of England and her pieces are inspired by the Victorian era, particularly the aesthetics and mood of that time in history. She describes her style as delicate, dark, and ethereal. Aside from Victorian sentimentality, she has repeated doing several themes like locks of hair, dainty hands, or love notes. Most of her works are purchased as an heirloom, wall decor, or a memorial piece. For more of her amazing works, visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Architecture

Marcel Breuer’s legacy in architecture and design is remembered in photos at the Met Breuer

The Met Breuer, the iconic museum in Manhattan, New York, formerly known as the Whitney Museum of American Art, has commissioned photographers Luisa Lambri and Bas Princen to take photos of some of the renowned works of the museum's namesake and architect, Marcel Breuer (1902-1981). Now exhibited at "Breuer Revisited: New Photographs," the museum's first architecture exhibition under its new name, Lambri and Princen's works capture the modernist spirit of Breuer's approach to architecture and as well as pay tribute  to the visionary quality of his oeuvre. Lambri and Princen took compelling snapshots of four of Breuer's landmark buildings, namely the Saint John’s Abbey Church in Collegeville, Minnesota, the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the IBM Research center in La Gaude, France, and, fittingly, the Met Breuer, which is renowned particularly for its form as an inverted ziggurat. The photos are characterized by their masterful employment of chiaroscuro,...
Art

Artist breathes new life into found objects by placing them in unrelated drawings

Have you ever found yourself seeing or regarding something as an entirely different, and much bigger, thing? Neuroscience PhD student and artist Desirée De León most certainly has, and her online project "100 Days of Tiny Things" sprang right out of an instance in which she gave life to a found object by treating it in a way that only someone with artistic inclinations would. “I remember noticing the disembodied head on the coins,” she says, “and I impulsively drew a speech bubble coming out of the coin’s mouth.” De León's series is a collection of minuscule objects that she has put a spin on and, thus, given a new existence to by situating them in drawings that point to an entirely different context. One work features a real orange segment that took on the image of the sun after De León drew a tree and giraffes beside it. Another work shows a dried flower heading in the direction of a drawing of dinosaurs, suggesting that it was the asteroid that killed the creatures....
Architecture

Handcrafted and industrial materials woven into highly expressive and functional pieces

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is currently having an exhibition entitled Design Currents. It opened last November and will continue to run until the 12th of March. The exhibit is the culmination of the work of three contemporary designers, Oki Sato, Faye Toogood, and Zanini de Zanine. All of them use handcrafted and industrial materials, turning them into functional and expressive pieces of art. The event creates a bridge between context and creativity. It gives us an insider look at the distinct culture of each designer, who all come from different countries. At the same time, we learn how collaboration and experimentation can help us improve our relationship with different objects. The event creates a bridge between context and creativity. It gives us an insider look at the distinct culture of each designer, who all come from different countries. At the same time, we learn how collaboration and experimentation can help us improve our relationship with different...
Art

Artist intricately illustrates flora and fauna as album art, print ads, and other forms of media

Erica Williams is an artist from Colorado but is currently based in Minneapolis. She went to Kansas City Art Institute for a year before becoming a freelance illustrator. Although her major influences are history, fiber arts, tattoo culture, folklore, fables, and mythology, it is her love for nature that significantly impacts her art. Growing up, she used to spend summers in rural Georgia where she was surrounded by forests and farmland. Years later, she is known for creating stunning, meticulous illustrations of anything found in nature -- mostly plants, flowers, and animals. Interestingly, although she has clients from different industries, her style also brought her a lot of clientele from the entertainment scene -- musicians and theaters, among others. She usually creates posters, album arts, print advertisements, and even t-shirt designs for her clients. She also accepts hand lettering projects. To know more about Erica and her works, she's on Facebook,...
Creativity

This designer creates exquisite costumes and headdresses for the stage

Agnieszka Osipa, 30, is a designer of headdresses and stage costumes. She was born in Nowa Sarzyna, a small town in southeastern Poland. Based on her works alone, it is obvious that she's a master of doing designs and actually creating them. Because of this, she has the rare advantage of transforming her stellar ideas to real masterpieces to the delight of the client, the wearer, the photographer, or whoever sees her works. She draws influence from music. She prefers to listen to dark folklore, ambient pagan, and folk metal which, needless to say, is the reason her pieces have the same dark appeal. One notable favorite material that she uses is leather due to its armory vibe. Some of the basic processes she does are leatherwork, sewing, and beading. Interestingly, this artist is not a fan of showing herself to public. So let's just feast on her art, shall we? Visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Art

Yayoi Kusama and the interesting story behind her art

Yayoi Kusama could just be one of the, if not the most, legendary living artists we have today. This 87-year-old Japanese virtuoso has worked in a variety of media including painting, collage, sculpture, installations, performance art, film, and writing. Most, if not all, of her works revolve around her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition, and pattern. Kusama's inspiration in creating is quite unusual. Her art is largely influenced by how she wants her viewers to get a glimpse and understanding of how her reality looks like. Interestingly, this artist has experienced hallucinations and severe obsessive thoughts since childhood which often is suicidal in nature. This can be due to the physical abuse she suffered from her mother as a small child. It was earlier in her career that she discovered what eventually became her trademark -- polka dots, or infinite nets as she calls them. For her, art is therapy and she describes herself as an obsessive...
Art

Science appreciated through art, art appreciated through science in ‘Science as Art’

The “Science as Art” exhibit is a one-of-a-kind event that will run until March 3 at the Washington State Legislative Building. It will continue from March 6 to April 8 at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle. This has been an annual exhibition that featured images courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "I always really like science as art because it lets you show something in a way that is more universally relatable. You don't have to have a technical background to be interested," says Nicole Overman, a materials engineer who captured the tungsten-copper alloy's close-up. The researchers at PNNL have been selecting, coloring, and submitting images for the Science as Art event since 2010. John LaFemina, the laboratory director, said, "We had all these images that were too interesting and too beautiful to hide in a drawer somewhere." And thus, the yearly tradition was born - and the rest of the country is now enjoying these exceptional...
Architecture

Illustrations pay homage to the rough beauty of Brutalist architecture

Eschewing refinement, Brutalist architecture was both a reaction to the style that came before it and a necessity of the times. The movement, characterized by ruggedness and bulk and which saw its glory from the 1950s through the 1970s, rejected the flair and finesse of 1930s and 1940s architecture and, at the same time, answered the need for inexpensive structures which resulted from the economic depression that followed the Second World War. Because of its disregard for comfort, at least in a visual sense, Brutalism -- whose name is derived from the French word "brut," which means raw -- has often been overlooked, notwithstanding the appreciation it got for its straightforwardness and utilitarian quality. In recent years, however, Brutalism has experienced a resurgence in popularity. The Brutalist idiom is once again being showcased, discussed and analyzed, on the Internet, in books, and even in film, such as the 2015 dystopian feature "High Rise." Brutalism...
Art

Artists from all over the world converge in the Centre for Computing History to create Teletext art

Teletext seems like an ancient relic to most of us. But just recently, artists from all over the world came together in an event to create Teletext art. They met in Cambridge at the Centre for Computing History, reveling in the wonder of the artform. For these people, this is not all old news - instead, it is a current, exciting, and real way to express themselves. They spent an entire weekend celebrating this unique form of art in a congregation known as the "Block Party". Raquel Meyers, a Swedish artist who has been amazed in using Teletext as an art form since 2012, explained: “It isn’t something you can make a profit from, so you can actually play with it. The idea is to show to people that you can do really crazy things and be really creative with something that’s supposed to be limited.” See the celebration and learn more about Teletext from the museum's website. ...
Architecture

Critiquing ideas of national identity and globalization using caged taxidermied birds and an upside-down tree

"Question the Wall Itself," a new exhibition at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, is all about the capacity to interrogate symbols and their (varied) meanings. As its title might suggest, the show features installations that poses, and arouses, questions on customary notions of space, both within and beyond a structure -- not only in a physical sense but, more importantly, in a psychological and political one. In the interactions between the works and the viewers, these notions are expected to be challenged or even reconstructed, making beholders reflect on, or perhaps cast a doubtful look at,  their own perceptions of belonging and identity. What belongs to whom? Does anything really rightfully constitute exclusivity of ownership? One of the works exhibited is Rosemarie Trockel’s "As far as possible." The work is composed of taxidermied birds in a cage and a palm tree hanging from the ceiling, along with other exoticized objects. Fionn Meade, artistic...
Design

Smart prototype “Spector” identifies hues and fonts with a click

For web designers and artists alike, inspiration can come from the most unexpected moments. You might encounter a hue you see as something fitting for an interior project or a suitable font for a web page while browsing through a magazine or reading a book. Only, you don’t have your computer or your swatches with you and the best thing you can do is take a photo for future reference. And they don’t always end up looking the same. The frustration that colors and fonts “never looks like it does on screen as it does in the finalized print” is exactly the reason behind UK designer Fiona O’Leary’s device. With the help of interaction designer David van Gemeran, she created “Spector” – a smart device that quickly identifies fonts and hues with a single click. The innovative prototype can store up to 20 references at once which can be transferred to a computer – a total designer’s dream. According to O’Leary, the device can further provide “other details...
Art

HoloLens will bring together artworks and buyers in mixed reality at The Armory Show 2017

Do you want to know how a painting looks on your wall before you even bring it home? Do you wish to pore over different artworks in a gallery without actually being there? The Armory Show can make that possible. Online art resource Artsy is teaming up with Microsoft this year to mount the fifth iteration of the annual art fair in order to bring a mixed-reality experience to art lovers and collectors. Happening at Piers 92/94 in New York from March 2 to 5, The Armory Show will bring works by different artists to buyers with the help of technological innovations, particularly Microsoft's HoloLens, touted to be world's first self-contained holographic computer. "By bringing art online and experimenting with the latest technology, including VR/AR, Artsy connects a global network of collectors and art enthusiasts to art from thousands of galleries, museums, auction houses and art fairs located around the world," said Elena Soboleva, Artsy's curator of special projects. ...
Architecture

SXSW 2017 to showcase enthralling installations under new art program

South by Southwest has indeed grown so much from its beginnings in 1987. Evidence of that is its upcoming exhibition of five art installations under the new SXSW Art Program, which launches in March, during the conglomerate's music and film festivals and conferences for this year. Both budding and known artists will take part in the program. Among them is Los Angeles-based artist Refik Anadol, whose work titled "Infinity Room" will be showcased. The work is made up of a space that transforms a beholder's view of reality into a "three-dimensional space of visualization." Speaking of the new program, SXSW chief programming officer Hugh Forrest said, "Art and Design [have] always been central to the SXSW ethos, and we have quickly become a recognized platform for visual artists to showcase art installations and connect with filmmakers, musicians, and technologists. The Art Program is the first time we have formalized the program and sought leading artists to design...
Architecture

700-year-old sacred tree located in a Japanese train station

Kayashima Station in the Northeast suburbs of central Osaka, Japan hosts a 700-year-old tree. The massive camphor tree has been around for centuries and is associated with a deity. The station first opened in 1910 and was soon plagued by overcrowding. Officials planned to remove the tree completely but all efforts were halted by locals fuelled by their belief in the tree's holy powers. It is said that a man who cut off one of its branches developed high fever the next day. The new station was completed in 1980 with the tree standing tall even to this day. Check out some images of the station below! ...
Design

TYLT’s Energi PRO is super comfy and built for charging on-the-go

A portable power bank is a must-have for tablet and smartphone power-users these days and if it's built right into your bag, wow! TYLT has been making top-notch power banks for a while and they recently launched the Energi PRO Power Backpack with a built-in 20,800 mAh battery. And I've been using it for two months now because if I'm carrying a laptop, a smartphone, and a tablet, the last thing O want is a jungle of wires. With ultra-strong, 210D polyester, this thing can not only withstand heavy loads with its 12 internal pockets, but it's built to endure rain, shine, and even blizzards (I live in Canada, eh?). USB-C? Check! Quick-charge three devices at once? Check! No cables in sight? You got it. The best thing about the Energi Pro, however, is its near-perfect distribution of weight throughout. When its sitting on your shoulders, the foam padding makes it feel extremely light. TYLT's newest backpack is powerful, comfortable, and definitely...
Art

Start your morning with Emilio Pucci’s adorable coffee cups

Drinking your cup of coffee should be a very special moment. Coffee drinking is a ritual that was inspiring the artist for many decades. We came to the point when coffee cups became a canvas for the artist. Maybe expected, but the most beautiful coffee cups design came directly from Italian fashion house, Emilio Pucci. Emilio Pucci’s “Cities of the World” collection is made in six colors and represents six most visited cities in Europe: London, Paris, New York, Milan, Florence and Rome. Drinking the coffee from these colorful cups will make you feel very cool. Take a look. [caption id="attachment_76321" align="alignnone" width="950"] [/caption] ...
Art

This galactic keyboard design looks good, but can you type well with it?

Massdrop is now selling the "GalaxC Keycap" keyboard set, now at $58. The purchase will only include the keycaps, without an actual keyboard, so you'll probably have to use the one you have. It is technically a set of mechanical keyboard caps that look like a galaxy. Now, this can be so much fun to look at. It will be exciting and unique, for sure, but once you actually use it, it can be quite a hassle. From the design point of view, it's absolutely stellar. But for functionality? We're betting you're probably going to pass on this one, unless you can type without looking at your keyboard at all. Otherwise, it may take you hours to finish a simple paragraph. So is it worth it? We'll leave the judging up to you. See some photos of this novelty keyboard below, with some closeup images, too. ...
Art

Takashi Murakami’s works re-imagined through glorious and breathtaking face paintings

Takashi Murakami is one of the most talented artists who can create art from the bizarre and eccentric. His works have spanned across various media platforms, using different techniques and materials along the way. But perhaps the most impressive of his work are those done with vivid colors and bold hues. Many artists are inspired by this kind of statement, so imagine what happened when the Make Up For Ever makeup school took it upon themselves to recreate Murakami's works using face paint! The results are very unlike what we've seen out there so far. And this is all in a good way. The apprentice artists who took the project definitely proved themselves worthy and ready to take the makeup world by storm, because if Murakami was to see their work, he would truly be honored and happy with how they interpreted his works of art. Check out their face paintings below. ...
Architecture

The greatest architectural project in London that was never built

Mies van der Rohe, one of the influential architects behind the rise of modernist architecture, was very specific with the projects he wanted to design. As opposed to fellow modernists Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright, he insisted on “making the existing city beautiful” rather than creating utopian visions that can also be concluded as fantasies. True to his beliefs, the Mansion House Square was conceived. But it was only after his death that inquiries were made and the design was consequently denied. It was Mies’ classic “skin and bones” architecture with all the meticulously detailed planning and industrial steel. In one smart move, it would have been able to address the complicated traffic grid surrounding the Bank of England. And, adjacent to the City Mayor’s residence, a public square would have been created for the people – an ingenious yet controversial scheme. The discussion about Mies’ unbuilt Mansion House Square still continues on...
Design

Two teenagers just solved your ice cream cone problems and it is delicious!

Fact: Ice cream can melt. And unless you’re a serious napkin hoarder or savage enough to lick those trickling lines of gooey sweetness, you’re at risk of getting yourself spoiled. Luckily for you ice cream lovers, 14-year-olds Oliver Greenwald and Sam Nassif from Colorado have provided an effective, yummy solution to your ice cream problems. The Drip Drop, an edible ring made out of waffle ingredients, is an ingenious idea conceived by the youngsters at an amazing age of 10. It’s basically a ring that catches any ice cream drips which you can easily slide onto the cone – and it comes in two flavors: Original and Chocolate. The two teenage designers already won 2nd place at the Gates Invention competition for the design and have scored a U.S. Design Patent just last 2015. Oliver and Sam believe that with the use of the delectable Drip Drops, people can forego using napkins and in turn save “approximately one million trees” every year. ...
Architecture

Frames and mirrors are more than just boring implements for French artist Mathias Kiss — they’re the artworks

Frames are objects of utility, there to fulfill practical functions rather than serve any more noble purpose, such as inspiring one to reflect on a given subject, as art is designed to do. But that's not the case for designer Mathias Kiss. For him, a frame, presented in a certain way, can be more than a material used to define the realm of an artwork; it can also be a thing of artistic value in itself in that he can use it to provoke thought. For the French artist, frames -- as well mirrors, which are equally mundane in their existence as implements --  can be artworks, ones that can decidedly go against classicism, as one might expect. "My inspiration comes from a reaction to my historical past, which I confront with fashion, music and with contemporary culture," he told The Globe and Mail. Kiss, born in Hungary, uses his training in painting and classicism as a counterpoint for what he intends to achieve with his art. "It’s the materials and codes of French classicism that I use...
Architecture

The 7th Room is a 33-foot tall treehouse in the Swedish woods

The 7th Room puts a whole new shine on the concept of tree houses. The structure is one of seven cabins available from northern Sweden’s Treehotel and offers a stunning view of the Aurora Borealis. The 7th Room was designed by architecture firm Snøhetta and features a base with black and white images of pine trees that give the illusion of reflection. The 33-foot tall cabin camouflages itself into the surrounding woods and floor-to-ceiling windows provide gorgeous views at all angles. Check it out below and find the other six cabins, like The Mirror Cube, on their website. ...
Architecture

Monochromatic 2D art created with computational tools and code featured in CCA exhibition

The California College of the Arts' (CCA) new Hubbell Street Galleries has recently hosted an exhibition featuring 22 commissioned works which take a closer look at the wide range of possibilities coming from computational tools without style restraints. Entitled “Drawing Codes: Experimental Protocols of Architectural Representation,” it is curated by CCA architecture faculty Andrew Kudless and Adam Marcus, AIA, with Clayton Muhleman. The exhibition focuses on the issues of representation, and this is made possible by limiting the works to 2D and monochrome settings. Also, an essential requirement for the artists was to use code either as a generative constraint, as a language, as a cipher, or as a script. “One of the things that I didn’t necessarily plan or expect is how that even with the focused and highly constrained call that we issued to the participants, the show represents a pretty compelling cross-section through contemporary architectural...
Art

Embroidered textile art gives “meticulous” a new meaning

Rachel Wright took fashion and textiles at Birmingham City University and finished both Bachelor and Master's degree there before starting up a business in 1994. Just a mere glimpse at her work says a lot about how passionate she is about embroidery. She takes inspiration from landscapes and cityscapes. Her favorite subjects are the sea, harbor towns, boats, and lighthouses. The shapes, colors, and details of these are then borrowed and echoed in delicately hand or machine embroidered fabric collages, using vibrant threads, worked onto papers and fabrics. The signature skies in her landscapes are often dramatic and expressive. Embroidery enables her to draw and paint using fabric and stitch as a medium. What makes her embroideries different is their striking colors which she uses to captivate and draw the viewer in. More than anything, her main goal is to delight the eyes of her audience. Aside from her website, you can learn more about Rachel Wright and her art...
Art

This baker makes cakes that you just couldn’t bear to slice

Emma Jayne Morris, 46, is a British cake designer based in Aberdare, South Wales who creates amazing life-like, animal-shaped cakes. Although she has made a lot of other designs, her dog-shaped works became the most popular because of its insanely realistic appearance. Emma runs a cake design business and would usually get unusual requests from clients like cakes in the shape of a bag, shirt, vinyl record player, house, yacht, hotdog sandwich, and shoes, among others. Emma uses vanilla sponge and fondant icing to create these adorable designs. She makes her dog-shaped cake based on photographs of actual dogs. The most challenging part for her is sculpting the sponge to its complicated shape but once she starts decorating and adding details, the process becomes fun for her. Emma started baking 6 years ago and since then, the passion has grown for making even more incredible ones in the future. For more of this artist's works, visit her website and Facebook page. ...
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