Category: Creativity

Art

Instagram artist makes lip art to die for, paints pregnant Beyonce on her mouth!

Jazmina Daniel is not your ordinary woman. She is not just talented. That would be an understatement. Her canvass of choice? Her lips! She has been posting amazing lip art on Instagram, and her latest work involved her painting Beyonce's pregnant photo on her lips. Without a doubt, Queen Bey's fans went crazy. The Australian artist captioned her photo: “I know I have a lot of Queen 🐝 Fans out there! This one is for you! @beyonce Tag the Queen if you think she’d approve 🐝,” She explained, “I chose to recreate Bey’s pregnancy announcement because everyone was so excited about it. There were a lot of people recreating it in pictures and I know that a lot of my followers were Beyoncé fans so it just seemed right to do. I felt inspired in the moment to do it!”  Some people can't even put lipstick on properly! Check out more of her amazing works below: ...
Art

From paintings to sculptures to furniture: artist Sean Talamini just can’t stop creating!

Sean Talamini is a freelance illustrator and fine artist from Philadelphia. He studied Illustration at University of the Arts. He creates paintings for galleries. Most, if not all, of his paintings, are made of acrylic on wood. His love for painting on wood started way back when he was just a child and would create art on his grandmother's wooden wall with a crayon. Obviously, not much has changed except he uses oil and acrylic paint now instead of crayons. These wood paintings have a certain texture that adds life to his works regardless of the coloring material he uses. Whenever he's not painting, he's sculpting. Though his sculptures are made with Super Sculpey, he uses wood to frame and hang them. If Sean is not sculpting, he builds furniture. I guess it's safe to say this artist just can't keep his hands from creating. For more of his beautiful works, visit his website and Instagram. ...
Art

Matthew J. Levin’s fantastical and eerie sculptures that will hunt your dreams

Matthew J. Levin is a sculptor and concept designer based in Los Angeles, California. To quote the Mexican film director, screenwriter, producer, and novelist Guillermo del Toro: “Mr. Levin’s portraiture is both quirky and mesmerizing. Each of his little sculptural sketches becomes a three-dimensional snapshot of the bizarre. Just as the eyes in a classical portrait are meant to “follow” you through the room, so will these disquieting Homunculi.” His love for this art started when he moved to Los Angeles in 2008 to work as a digital sculptor. A year later, he chanced upon a box of Super Sculpey, a unique polymer clay, and that's when the affair began. Since then, his work has been shown on TV, displayed in different galleries, and commissioned by film directors like del Toro, among others. To know more about this artist and to see more of his sculptures, visit his website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Art

Insane finish of illustrator’s patterned drawings shows us her exquisite process and influences

Daria Hlazatova is an artist from a small town near the Carpathians in Ukraine. She loves drawing and creating handmade collages. We have recently featured artists whose arts were inspired by the very environment surrounding them and Daria is no different. True enough, she admitted to an interview with Talenthouse that her work and style are syntheses of everything she has seen, enjoyed, and dreamed of. Her illustrations, in all their intricacies and patterns, show most of her influences, from Slavic folklore and fairy tales to modern day pop culture icons. She obviously loves myths and legends so much but the main things that inspire her to create these masterpieces are music, traveling, gardens, ocean, people, and theater. It’s quite phenomenal how she is able to create drawings with hundreds of shapes, patterns, colors and details, yet is still able to maintain a sense of balance and peace. Visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram to see more of her arts.  ...
Art

‘Memorial Stitches’ artist creates embroidered heirlooms that are seamless, even without formal training

Carrie Violet of Memorial Stitches studied both fashion design and illustration. Because of this, it makes most sense that embroidery becomes second nature to her as it allows her to apply both skills seamlessly. Although she did not have any formal embroidery training, her style never stopped improving until her works became a flawless tactile version of what is normally a paint on canvas and pen on paper for other artists. Carrie is from North of England and her pieces are inspired by the Victorian era, particularly the aesthetics and mood of that time in history. She describes her style as delicate, dark, and ethereal. Aside from Victorian sentimentality, she has repeated doing several themes like locks of hair, dainty hands, or love notes. Most of her works are purchased as an heirloom, wall decor, or a memorial piece. For more of her amazing works, visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Architecture

Marcel Breuer’s legacy in architecture and design is remembered in photos at the Met Breuer

The Met Breuer, the iconic museum in Manhattan, New York, formerly known as the Whitney Museum of American Art, has commissioned photographers Luisa Lambri and Bas Princen to take photos of some of the renowned works of the museum's namesake and architect, Marcel Breuer (1902-1981). Now exhibited at "Breuer Revisited: New Photographs," the museum's first architecture exhibition under its new name, Lambri and Princen's works capture the modernist spirit of Breuer's approach to architecture and as well as pay tribute  to the visionary quality of his oeuvre. Lambri and Princen took compelling snapshots of four of Breuer's landmark buildings, namely the Saint John’s Abbey Church in Collegeville, Minnesota, the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the IBM Research center in La Gaude, France, and, fittingly, the Met Breuer, which is renowned particularly for its form as an inverted ziggurat. The photos are characterized by their masterful employment of chiaroscuro,...
Art

The prominent nose of Zan von Zed’s fierce females

Unlike other artists, Zan von Zed, a doodler and painter from Sydney, Australia does not usually have back stories for her art. Most, if not all, of her masterpieces, are pencil-drawing of fierce females. In an interview with Beautiful Bizarre, she admitted to drawing without a plan. She generally just begins with a face and let the drawing evolve. As for the prominent noses, there's not much of a message she wants to send. It's just her plain liking for faces with prominent real noses, contrary to the whittled-down, Hollywood cookie-cutter ones depicted everywhere. Needless to say, this adds an extra oomph to the strength and dignity these females offer. For Zan, drawing is an outlet. And interestingly, she gets inspiration from Pinterest and Tumblr. She usually completes a painting within two 2 days if using watercolor, one day for colored drawing, and weeks for an oil painting. For more of this artist's beautiful creations, visit her website, Facebook, Tumblr,...
Art

Celebrate love in a brand new way for your special ones with these striking paper hearts

At once striking and minimal, these framed hearts by FROM PAPER WITH LOVE on Etsy accentuate your V-Day celebrations. The Russia-based graphic designer launched the project as an ode to Valentines Day. The paper creations come in the shape of polygonal hearts fixed inside of a frame. The best part about them is that they're actually meant to be assembled by a couple. The very act of putting the hearts together and then framing them is part of the experience and is sure to foster affection. Check out some of the hearts below and gift one to your significant other, Valentines Day or not! Pick 'em here!      ...
Art

Artist breathes new life into found objects by placing them in unrelated drawings

Have you ever found yourself seeing or regarding something as an entirely different, and much bigger, thing? Neuroscience PhD student and artist Desirée De León most certainly has, and her online project "100 Days of Tiny Things" sprang right out of an instance in which she gave life to a found object by treating it in a way that only someone with artistic inclinations would. “I remember noticing the disembodied head on the coins,” she says, “and I impulsively drew a speech bubble coming out of the coin’s mouth.” De León's series is a collection of minuscule objects that she has put a spin on and, thus, given a new existence to by situating them in drawings that point to an entirely different context. One work features a real orange segment that took on the image of the sun after De León drew a tree and giraffes beside it. Another work shows a dried flower heading in the direction of a drawing of dinosaurs, suggesting that it was the asteroid that killed the creatures....
Art

Artist makes amazing portraits by gluing bits of junk together, forming incredible images in the process

Zac Freeman graduated cum laude from his degree of Fine Arts at Jacksonville University, Florida in 1997. What might seem to be useless for others, this Florida-based artist turns into a thing of beauty. He creates artworks made entirely of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. He started collecting these materials in 1999. He glues the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. His art communicates through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. He values the importance of incorporating actual object or junk in the finished product as he believes it carries energy in itself. Freeman's work has been commissioned for use in commercials for Absolut Vodka. In 2010, he won the Art Chicago award and has been exhibited at major art fairs in London, Miami, Chicago, Toronto, Houston and the Hamptons, New York. To get...
Creativity

This designer creates exquisite costumes and headdresses for the stage

Agnieszka Osipa, 30, is a designer of headdresses and stage costumes. She was born in Nowa Sarzyna, a small town in southeastern Poland. Based on her works alone, it is obvious that she's a master of doing designs and actually creating them. Because of this, she has the rare advantage of transforming her stellar ideas to real masterpieces to the delight of the client, the wearer, the photographer, or whoever sees her works. She draws influence from music. She prefers to listen to dark folklore, ambient pagan, and folk metal which, needless to say, is the reason her pieces have the same dark appeal. One notable favorite material that she uses is leather due to its armory vibe. Some of the basic processes she does are leatherwork, sewing, and beading. Interestingly, this artist is not a fan of showing herself to public. So let's just feast on her art, shall we? Visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Books

“Reunions” – where we are going to be in 30 years?

Street photographer Chris Porsz was actively photographing ordinary people during the 70s and 80s in his hometown Peterborough in England. During the ten previous years, Porsz tried to find the characters from his pictures and invite them for a nostalgic reunion. Guess what, his project was very successful and resulted in the 135 reunions and a book. For this kind of project, one has to plan, research and invest energy. However, the pictures evoke empathic and wonderful emotions in every viewer and surely it was an unforgettable experience for the participants in this project. Below you will find a handful of photos from the book. To order the book and find out a bit more about the characters on the photos click here. ...
Art

Yayoi Kusama and the interesting story behind her art

Yayoi Kusama could just be one of the, if not the most, legendary living artists we have today. This 87-year-old Japanese virtuoso has worked in a variety of media including painting, collage, sculpture, installations, performance art, film, and writing. Most, if not all, of her works revolve around her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition, and pattern. Kusama's inspiration in creating is quite unusual. Her art is largely influenced by how she wants her viewers to get a glimpse and understanding of how her reality looks like. Interestingly, this artist has experienced hallucinations and severe obsessive thoughts since childhood which often is suicidal in nature. This can be due to the physical abuse she suffered from her mother as a small child. It was earlier in her career that she discovered what eventually became her trademark -- polka dots, or infinite nets as she calls them. For her, art is therapy and she describes herself as an obsessive...
Art

Tray tables of Delta Airlines aircraft come alive with colorful drawings of vibrant cities

Passengers of one of Delta Airlines' Boeing 767 planes will be in for a treat when they assume their places on the aircraft. Right on the tray tables in front of the, they will see vibrant drawings by a number of artists commissioned by the airline as part of an initiative to celebrate the liveliness and culture of several cities around the world. The artworks in the project, which was mounted in cooperation with Coca-Cola, feature the artists' interpretation of life in London, Sao Paulo, Shanghai, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, and Seoul, among others. Some of the artists who took part in the campaign are Stevie Gee, who depicted Los Angeles; Alex Yanes, who drew Sao Paulo; Ping Zhu, who tackled Shanghai; Pedro Campiche, who made an artistic representation of New York City; Sac Magique, who submitted a collage-like drawing of Amsterdam; and Yulia Brodskaya, who took on Seoul. Their drawings appear below in the order that they were mentioned. The original trays are...
Creativity

#GandalfTheGuide: Photographer documents his tour of Middle Earth

Akhil Suhas is a photographer who was blessed enough to live and study in a country with an endless amount of scenery and landscapes to offer -- New Zealand. Of course, we know this country to be the very place where J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings took place. In the novel, he calls it the Middle Earth. Naturally, Suhas took advantage of this privilege, went to a 15,000-kilometer adventure and documented it using photos. With so many people already touring the country due to its LOTR fame, this photographer wanted to stand out. He first tried taking photographs of himself in a Gandalf costume using a tripod but it didn't work for him. He then decided to ask people he met along the way to put on the outfit and surprisingly, they agreed. This cross-country tour was life-changing for Suhas and if you follow him on Instagram, and see his photographs and stories, it could change your life, too. His website is also worth checking out. Enjoy! ...
Architecture

Illustrations pay homage to the rough beauty of Brutalist architecture

Eschewing refinement, Brutalist architecture was both a reaction to the style that came before it and a necessity of the times. The movement, characterized by ruggedness and bulk and which saw its glory from the 1950s through the 1970s, rejected the flair and finesse of 1930s and 1940s architecture and, at the same time, answered the need for inexpensive structures which resulted from the economic depression that followed the Second World War. Because of its disregard for comfort, at least in a visual sense, Brutalism -- whose name is derived from the French word "brut," which means raw -- has often been overlooked, notwithstanding the appreciation it got for its straightforwardness and utilitarian quality. In recent years, however, Brutalism has experienced a resurgence in popularity. The Brutalist idiom is once again being showcased, discussed and analyzed, on the Internet, in books, and even in film, such as the 2015 dystopian feature "High Rise." Brutalism...
Art

Artists from all over the world converge in the Centre for Computing History to create Teletext art

Teletext seems like an ancient relic to most of us. But just recently, artists from all over the world came together in an event to create Teletext art. They met in Cambridge at the Centre for Computing History, reveling in the wonder of the artform. For these people, this is not all old news - instead, it is a current, exciting, and real way to express themselves. They spent an entire weekend celebrating this unique form of art in a congregation known as the "Block Party". Raquel Meyers, a Swedish artist who has been amazed in using Teletext as an art form since 2012, explained: “It isn’t something you can make a profit from, so you can actually play with it. The idea is to show to people that you can do really crazy things and be really creative with something that’s supposed to be limited.” See the celebration and learn more about Teletext from the museum's website. ...
Art

Vandalism turns into something marvelous thanks to local artists’ hard work and creativity

Richard Miller owns a variety store and received a notice to clean up the parking lot beside his property, which was teeming with graffiti. He initially thought that the graffiti was actually pretty good, but got excited when some local artists opened up about ideas with him. The artists are members of Art for Art's Sake (AFAS), a group that promotes expression through art. “Originally the plan was to put framework around the graffiti to show that we support the artistic pieces that can be created through graffiti. I discussed it with a few artists and the artists started incorporating their own designs into the letters that were already there,” said artist Stewart Knight. Artist Sarah Hensley said, “I didn’t want to cover up or totally remove the graffiti. We got our friends involved and now it is this huge crazy art wall, and it looks really cool. I kept the graffiti in my art. People kept walking by to see it and said that looks like fun.” ...
Architecture

Critiquing ideas of national identity and globalization using caged taxidermied birds and an upside-down tree

"Question the Wall Itself," a new exhibition at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, is all about the capacity to interrogate symbols and their (varied) meanings. As its title might suggest, the show features installations that poses, and arouses, questions on customary notions of space, both within and beyond a structure -- not only in a physical sense but, more importantly, in a psychological and political one. In the interactions between the works and the viewers, these notions are expected to be challenged or even reconstructed, making beholders reflect on, or perhaps cast a doubtful look at,  their own perceptions of belonging and identity. What belongs to whom? Does anything really rightfully constitute exclusivity of ownership? One of the works exhibited is Rosemarie Trockel’s "As far as possible." The work is composed of taxidermied birds in a cage and a palm tree hanging from the ceiling, along with other exoticized objects. Fionn Meade, artistic...
Art

Becoming the truest form of yourself is the best way to express and create art, a young man realizes

As a third-year student, Matthew Bateson never thought that the time would come when his life would revolve around art. When he was younger, all he ever cared about was "guy" stuff, like sports and skateboards. Of course, these activities led to more than a few physical injuries. He reached a certain point where he realized that he was mortal - and he cared enough to preserve his health and life. Unknown to him, then, was the opening of another opportunity: the window of art expression. “I want my art to be the truest manifestation of myself,” according to him, “It’s hard to verbalize the style or feeling behind my work so I would say that I have a loose style. My sculptures, my prints, they all have this fluid quality. I’m inspired a lot by spontaneity and whatever feels right. The most important thing is to just work really hard at what you’re doing and not care what other people think of you.” You can find more of Bateson’s work on Instagram. ...
Art

Hundreds of artists create chalk paintings on the streets, turning Lake Worth into a temporary “outdoor museum”

The 23rd Annual Lake Worth Painting Festival was another resounding success this year. Last February 26, the final day of the festival took place. Hundreds of artists flocked to create an "outdoor museum" of sorts on the street, catching the attention of passers-by, both local and tourists. Located at the Lake Worth downtown area, the streets were paved with colors and shades using chalk to create art that can captivate the hearts of art lovers anywhere. This festivity is unique because the art was ephemeral, lasting for a mere few hours or until the rain and traffic has washed it off of the streets. It is thanks to the photographers who can keep these temporary moments eternal, for everyone to see. The street Painting Festival is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. all proceeds raised produce the street Painting Festival event, and benefit the street Painting Festival scholarship and community projects associated with the arts. ...
Art

Exceptional choreography through contemporary dance and performance art creates a visual spectacle for public audiences

Branch Nebula aims to engage its audiences through performance art, continually pushing the boundaries of political and social awareness. The founders, Lee Wilson and Mirabelle Wouters, have used the project as a platform for their communal creativity since they began in 1999. Through modern dance and performance in the public sphere, they reach out to audiences who would not ordinarily go to theaters (mostly because of socio-economic reasons). "This is site-specificity of the most immediate kind, a visceral connection to a place of play, not its social role or its history, in a display of what is often regarded as fun but here as art without losing the integrity of its popular foundations. The outcome is a visual spectacle, impeccably choreographed so that star turns are embedded in and shoot out of the mesmeric poetry of the grand sweeping collective rides and runs that transform the concrete into a magic, enabling vessel." – Keith Gallasch, Real Time ...
Art

See food in a new light as various artists mix up common offerings with creativity

Food art is a fan favorite here at Design Faves, and it's not hard to see why. When a talented artist mixes food and art together, we get something that is pleasant both to our sight and our taste. The fact is that there are virtually unlimited possibilities with food art - you just have to let your imagination run wild! Below are some photos showcasing this very feat. Who knows? You might be inspired to create your own food art pieces, too! In photos, from top to bottom: Brown rice and Omelette teddy bear (Fancy Edibles), Ogbono delicacy African beauty (Haneefah Adams), Bread and coffee Instagram logo (Daryna Kossar), Pineapple parrot (My Honey's Place), Red Onion Owl (Abhay Chatre), Leafy green dress (Sarah Illenberger), Carrot crab (Becky90210), Banana Dolphins (Michelle from Crafty Recipes), and Zobo lady (Haneefah Adams). Which one caught your attention the most? ...
Art

HoloLens will bring together artworks and buyers in mixed reality at The Armory Show 2017

Do you want to know how a painting looks on your wall before you even bring it home? Do you wish to pore over different artworks in a gallery without actually being there? The Armory Show can make that possible. Online art resource Artsy is teaming up with Microsoft this year to mount the fifth iteration of the annual art fair in order to bring a mixed-reality experience to art lovers and collectors. Happening at Piers 92/94 in New York from March 2 to 5, The Armory Show will bring works by different artists to buyers with the help of technological innovations, particularly Microsoft's HoloLens, touted to be world's first self-contained holographic computer. "By bringing art online and experimenting with the latest technology, including VR/AR, Artsy connects a global network of collectors and art enthusiasts to art from thousands of galleries, museums, auction houses and art fairs located around the world," said Elena Soboleva, Artsy's curator of special projects. ...
Architecture

SXSW 2017 to showcase enthralling installations under new art program

South by Southwest has indeed grown so much from its beginnings in 1987. Evidence of that is its upcoming exhibition of five art installations under the new SXSW Art Program, which launches in March, during the conglomerate's music and film festivals and conferences for this year. Both budding and known artists will take part in the program. Among them is Los Angeles-based artist Refik Anadol, whose work titled "Infinity Room" will be showcased. The work is made up of a space that transforms a beholder's view of reality into a "three-dimensional space of visualization." Speaking of the new program, SXSW chief programming officer Hugh Forrest said, "Art and Design [have] always been central to the SXSW ethos, and we have quickly become a recognized platform for visual artists to showcase art installations and connect with filmmakers, musicians, and technologists. The Art Program is the first time we have formalized the program and sought leading artists to design...
Art

The many colors of street artist Locustsongs

LocustSongs is the pseudonym to this San Francisco-based artist who has taken his art from the canvas to the streets. This self-admitted punk-influenced artist was born and raised in Michigan and left as soon as he finished high school. He thought he won't be the artist he is today had he chosen to stay in his hometown. He calls himself a weirdo and admitted that smoking weed made him creatively compulsive and optimistic. Locust is known for his artworks on the street walls of San Francisco. In an interview with StreetArtSF, he expressed early aversion to art in galleries saying it did not feel right and it was not his scene. It was in 2009 when he started painting on walls, both indoor and outdoor. He believes in the importance of scale and that sometimes art should be bigger than the person, or bigger than the frame, or even beyond the gallery. He mainly uses house/mural paint for street arts and acrylics and markers for paintings. For more about LocustSongs, visit his website,...
Architecture

From the young boy in the backyard to “rattan’s first virtuoso”

A multi-awarded furniture designer and manufacturer from Cebu, Philippines, Kenneth Cobonpue made a name both in the local and international for his unique designs and roster of clientele that include names such as Queen Sophia of Spain and Brad Pitt.  Cobonpue’s trademark is the integration of locally sourced materials with innovative handmade production processes. His craft is recognized by different award-giving bodies around the globe like the American Society of Interior Design and French Coup de Couer to name a few. His designs have also appeared in films, music videos, and US TV series. In 2007, Kenneth was named by TIME magazine as “rattan’s first virtuoso”. Kenneth was born in a Chinese family and was initially encouraged by his father to take up a business course. But his love for designing was developed at an early age when he used to play with various materials and create furniture pieces at his mother’s backyard factory. Although he followed...
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