Category: Art

Art

William P. Chappel’s paintings offer glimpse of life in early 19th-century New York City

If for any reason you've wondered what New York City was like in the 19th century, you might want to look to William P. Chappel's (1801–1878) paintings to get both broad and specific ideas. Chappel, who was a tinsmith by profession but was also an amateur -- and accomplished -- painter, depicted life and happenings in New York, which, if the artist's works are any indication, seems to have always been lively and animated. Twenty-four of his works whose subject is the city are currently on view at the the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in an exhibit that will run until May 14. The paintings show the many facets of life in New York City, including how the dwellers plied their trade, what they did for pastimes, what technologies were present at the time, what the traditions were like, and what happened at night, among other subjects. The 24 paintings by Chappel that are on display at the Met may be viewed here. ...
Art

Instagram artist makes lip art to die for, paints pregnant Beyonce on her mouth!

Jazmina Daniel is not your ordinary woman. She is not just talented. That would be an understatement. Her canvass of choice? Her lips! She has been posting amazing lip art on Instagram, and her latest work involved her painting Beyonce's pregnant photo on her lips. Without a doubt, Queen Bey's fans went crazy. The Australian artist captioned her photo: “I know I have a lot of Queen 🐝 Fans out there! This one is for you! @beyonce Tag the Queen if you think she’d approve 🐝,” She explained, “I chose to recreate Bey’s pregnancy announcement because everyone was so excited about it. There were a lot of people recreating it in pictures and I know that a lot of my followers were Beyoncé fans so it just seemed right to do. I felt inspired in the moment to do it!”  Some people can't even put lipstick on properly! Check out more of her amazing works below: ...
Art

Selfies gone bad: Tourist accidentally trips onto an $800,000 art piece inside exhibit

How far will you go to get an Instagram-worthy photo? A visitor at the recent event, Infinity Mirrors - All the Eternal Love I Have for the Pumpkins by Yayoi Kusama, held at the Hirshborn Museum in Washington, D.C. accidentally tripped on one of the installations while attempting to get a selfie. Although no official announcement was made, it is rumored that the sculpture amounts to $800,000. It may not be entirely the visitor's fault, though, since there is a limited number of people allowed inside the installation at a single time. This means that there is low to no security personnel to guide the tourists about the proper behaviors acceptable. The installation is described as "narrow walkways, transparent barriers, and plenty of darkness". But whether this is the case or not, people should really start behaving more like civilized tourists during these sophisticated shows. After all, the artist did work really hard to get these done, don't you think? ...
Art

Renowned artist from Myanmar was destined to become a painter from childhood

“My father ordered us to play music, paint, and more until we were 10 years old. After we turned 10 if we didn’t have any interest in the arts we were allowed to choose something else. But I took an interest in art. I created art and music, I became a movie director… Directing is the art of storytelling." These were the words of Myanmar icon Win Pe. Throughout his career, he has become an award-winning director and filmmaker, as well as a radio producer in other Western countries. He is now 82 years old - and has dabbled into various fields of art, including working as a cartoonist, writer, and editor. However, painting seems to be the core of his interests even after all these years. “I have always created paintings. I read painting books. I even dream of paintings,” he says. Learn more about his work. Win Pe's latest exhibition is at the Yangon Gallery. ...
Art

From paintings to sculptures to furniture: artist Sean Talamini just can’t stop creating!

Sean Talamini is a freelance illustrator and fine artist from Philadelphia. He studied Illustration at University of the Arts. He creates paintings for galleries. Most, if not all, of his paintings, are made of acrylic on wood. His love for painting on wood started way back when he was just a child and would create art on his grandmother's wooden wall with a crayon. Obviously, not much has changed except he uses oil and acrylic paint now instead of crayons. These wood paintings have a certain texture that adds life to his works regardless of the coloring material he uses. Whenever he's not painting, he's sculpting. Though his sculptures are made with Super Sculpey, he uses wood to frame and hang them. If Sean is not sculpting, he builds furniture. I guess it's safe to say this artist just can't keep his hands from creating. For more of his beautiful works, visit his website and Instagram. ...
Art

Matthew J. Levin’s fantastical and eerie sculptures that will hunt your dreams

Matthew J. Levin is a sculptor and concept designer based in Los Angeles, California. To quote the Mexican film director, screenwriter, producer, and novelist Guillermo del Toro: “Mr. Levin’s portraiture is both quirky and mesmerizing. Each of his little sculptural sketches becomes a three-dimensional snapshot of the bizarre. Just as the eyes in a classical portrait are meant to “follow” you through the room, so will these disquieting Homunculi.” His love for this art started when he moved to Los Angeles in 2008 to work as a digital sculptor. A year later, he chanced upon a box of Super Sculpey, a unique polymer clay, and that's when the affair began. Since then, his work has been shown on TV, displayed in different galleries, and commissioned by film directors like del Toro, among others. To know more about this artist and to see more of his sculptures, visit his website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Art

Insane finish of illustrator’s patterned drawings shows us her exquisite process and influences

Daria Hlazatova is an artist from a small town near the Carpathians in Ukraine. She loves drawing and creating handmade collages. We have recently featured artists whose arts were inspired by the very environment surrounding them and Daria is no different. True enough, she admitted to an interview with Talenthouse that her work and style are syntheses of everything she has seen, enjoyed, and dreamed of. Her illustrations, in all their intricacies and patterns, show most of her influences, from Slavic folklore and fairy tales to modern day pop culture icons. She obviously loves myths and legends so much but the main things that inspire her to create these masterpieces are music, traveling, gardens, ocean, people, and theater. It’s quite phenomenal how she is able to create drawings with hundreds of shapes, patterns, colors and details, yet is still able to maintain a sense of balance and peace. Visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram to see more of her arts.  ...
Art

More than 35 artists contributed for strange cutlery collection that slows down people’s eating

Spoons and forks forged from wrenches, tongs, and scissors are just a few of the absurd utensils shown on Steinbeisser’s annual food and design event. The Amsterdam-based design studio curated cutlery inventions from more than 35 different designers and artists for the Experimental Gastronomy collection. The strange-looking creations were commissioned by the studio to slow down the time which people normally spend eating. Martin Kullik, the founder of Steinbeisser, reportedly said the results of the show were “very interesting” and that the extra time spent on chewing helped “contribute to enhancing the taste experience.” World-renowned designers contributed their unique works for the show. Estonian artist Nils Hint made oversized utensils using recycled tools from junk yards all over Estonia. Dutch designers Lisanne van Zanten and Renee Boute, however, experimented with the taste of the food itself. They used colored cutlery for their contribution:...
Art

Gameboy, Blackberry, iPhone, and more retro gaming patents sold as wall art

For most people, a classical painting or artistic portrait is the ideal hanging on the wall. Others settle for motivational posters for its simplicity and neutrality. But for gaming enthusiasts, there are not many choices to choose from. Luckily, a newly-opened online store has just opened that would definitely amaze the gaming community. Retro Patent, a project-cum-startup, features patent prints of historical gaming icons as wall décor. The collection ranges from the iconic Gameboy, to advanced technological inventions such as the Blackberry and the iPhone. The online shop founders Aidan Sliney and Craig Watson came up with the idea when they were traveling to Copenhagen with their wives. It was in a small boutique shop that they discovered a patent print of the classic Harley-Davidson. It was a personal project at first but eventually became a business once people started asking them for copies. The Retro Patent wall hangings come in 12 x 8 inches and 24 x 36 inches...
Art

Russian artist illustrates brutally honest portraits of the modern world

Vladimir Kazak certainly aims for a lasting great impression with his new collection. The Russian-born artist, who, according to his website, enjoys “drawing women and airplanes,” perfectly depicts modern day thinking in his brutally honest illustrations. His shocking portrayal of everyday life shows the irony and truth about people in this age that is almost never talked about. The artist argues his works are purely satirical and insists the comical factor of his collection. One of the illustrations show people, all made to look like robots, sitting indifferently beside each other inside a train. Another illustration shows an aerial view of a woman’s covered breasts with hungry-looking pigs all sitting around her. This particular art was thought to seemingly point out the unwanted harassments that women are subjected to every day. Some critics think Kazak’s art is too political while others seem to agree with his unobstructed view of the modern world....
Art

‘Memorial Stitches’ artist creates embroidered heirlooms that are seamless, even without formal training

Carrie Violet of Memorial Stitches studied both fashion design and illustration. Because of this, it makes most sense that embroidery becomes second nature to her as it allows her to apply both skills seamlessly. Although she did not have any formal embroidery training, her style never stopped improving until her works became a flawless tactile version of what is normally a paint on canvas and pen on paper for other artists. Carrie is from North of England and her pieces are inspired by the Victorian era, particularly the aesthetics and mood of that time in history. She describes her style as delicate, dark, and ethereal. Aside from Victorian sentimentality, she has repeated doing several themes like locks of hair, dainty hands, or love notes. Most of her works are purchased as an heirloom, wall decor, or a memorial piece. For more of her amazing works, visit her website, Facebook, and Instagram. ...
Architecture

Marcel Breuer’s legacy in architecture and design is remembered in photos at the Met Breuer

The Met Breuer, the iconic museum in Manhattan, New York, formerly known as the Whitney Museum of American Art, has commissioned photographers Luisa Lambri and Bas Princen to take photos of some of the renowned works of the museum's namesake and architect, Marcel Breuer (1902-1981). Now exhibited at "Breuer Revisited: New Photographs," the museum's first architecture exhibition under its new name, Lambri and Princen's works capture the modernist spirit of Breuer's approach to architecture and as well as pay tribute  to the visionary quality of his oeuvre. Lambri and Princen took compelling snapshots of four of Breuer's landmark buildings, namely the Saint John’s Abbey Church in Collegeville, Minnesota, the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the IBM Research center in La Gaude, France, and, fittingly, the Met Breuer, which is renowned particularly for its form as an inverted ziggurat. The photos are characterized by their masterful employment of chiaroscuro,...
Art

The prominent nose of Zan von Zed’s fierce females

Unlike other artists, Zan von Zed, a doodler and painter from Sydney, Australia does not usually have back stories for her art. Most, if not all, of her masterpieces, are pencil-drawing of fierce females. In an interview with Beautiful Bizarre, she admitted to drawing without a plan. She generally just begins with a face and let the drawing evolve. As for the prominent noses, there's not much of a message she wants to send. It's just her plain liking for faces with prominent real noses, contrary to the whittled-down, Hollywood cookie-cutter ones depicted everywhere. Needless to say, this adds an extra oomph to the strength and dignity these females offer. For Zan, drawing is an outlet. And interestingly, she gets inspiration from Pinterest and Tumblr. She usually completes a painting within two 2 days if using watercolor, one day for colored drawing, and weeks for an oil painting. For more of this artist's beautiful creations, visit her website, Facebook, Tumblr,...
Art

Fashion photographer takes cinematic images that embody melancholic symbolism

Fashion has worked side by side with photography to give the audience a complete experience visually. Artists like Elizaveta Porodina is one of those who brings success to these collaborations bringing the spectators to a whole new level of understanding of the art. Porodina was born in Moscow. In her experimental fashion and fine art photography, she travels through time and space, extracting the underlying emotions in her entrancing productions. She studied clinical Psychology and this could just be the biggest influence on her masterpieces. Her melancholic symbolism sets connotations, sometimes ambiguous, sometimes honest and obvious. Her imagery range widely varying between cinematic, fashion and almost documentary. This artist had a couple of exhibitions in 2016. She had worked with magazines like Vogue, Elle, among others. She also had collaborations with Louis Vuitton, BMW MINI, and others for commercials. More information about Porodina can...
Art

Celebrate love in a brand new way for your special ones with these striking paper hearts

At once striking and minimal, these framed hearts by FROM PAPER WITH LOVE on Etsy accentuate your V-Day celebrations. The Russia-based graphic designer launched the project as an ode to Valentines Day. The paper creations come in the shape of polygonal hearts fixed inside of a frame. The best part about them is that they're actually meant to be assembled by a couple. The very act of putting the hearts together and then framing them is part of the experience and is sure to foster affection. Check out some of the hearts below and gift one to your significant other, Valentines Day or not! Pick 'em here!      ...
Art

Artist breathes new life into found objects by placing them in unrelated drawings

Have you ever found yourself seeing or regarding something as an entirely different, and much bigger, thing? Neuroscience PhD student and artist Desirée De León most certainly has, and her online project "100 Days of Tiny Things" sprang right out of an instance in which she gave life to a found object by treating it in a way that only someone with artistic inclinations would. “I remember noticing the disembodied head on the coins,” she says, “and I impulsively drew a speech bubble coming out of the coin’s mouth.” De León's series is a collection of minuscule objects that she has put a spin on and, thus, given a new existence to by situating them in drawings that point to an entirely different context. One work features a real orange segment that took on the image of the sun after De León drew a tree and giraffes beside it. Another work shows a dried flower heading in the direction of a drawing of dinosaurs, suggesting that it was the asteroid that killed the creatures....
Architecture

Handcrafted and industrial materials woven into highly expressive and functional pieces

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is currently having an exhibition entitled Design Currents. It opened last November and will continue to run until the 12th of March. The exhibit is the culmination of the work of three contemporary designers, Oki Sato, Faye Toogood, and Zanini de Zanine. All of them use handcrafted and industrial materials, turning them into functional and expressive pieces of art. The event creates a bridge between context and creativity. It gives us an insider look at the distinct culture of each designer, who all come from different countries. At the same time, we learn how collaboration and experimentation can help us improve our relationship with different objects. The event creates a bridge between context and creativity. It gives us an insider look at the distinct culture of each designer, who all come from different countries. At the same time, we learn how collaboration and experimentation can help us improve our relationship with different...
Art

Artist makes amazing portraits by gluing bits of junk together, forming incredible images in the process

Zac Freeman graduated cum laude from his degree of Fine Arts at Jacksonville University, Florida in 1997. What might seem to be useless for others, this Florida-based artist turns into a thing of beauty. He creates artworks made entirely of collected junk, found objects, and general trash. He started collecting these materials in 1999. He glues the bits of junk to a wooden substrate to form an image, usually faces, which only can be seen at a distance. His art communicates through visual representation in apparent 2-dimensional space and through the actual objects used for the medium in 3-dimensional space. He values the importance of incorporating actual object or junk in the finished product as he believes it carries energy in itself. Freeman's work has been commissioned for use in commercials for Absolut Vodka. In 2010, he won the Art Chicago award and has been exhibited at major art fairs in London, Miami, Chicago, Toronto, Houston and the Hamptons, New York. To get...
Art

Artist intricately illustrates flora and fauna as album art, print ads, and other forms of media

Erica Williams is an artist from Colorado but is currently based in Minneapolis. She went to Kansas City Art Institute for a year before becoming a freelance illustrator. Although her major influences are history, fiber arts, tattoo culture, folklore, fables, and mythology, it is her love for nature that significantly impacts her art. Growing up, she used to spend summers in rural Georgia where she was surrounded by forests and farmland. Years later, she is known for creating stunning, meticulous illustrations of anything found in nature -- mostly plants, flowers, and animals. Interestingly, although she has clients from different industries, her style also brought her a lot of clientele from the entertainment scene -- musicians and theaters, among others. She usually creates posters, album arts, print advertisements, and even t-shirt designs for her clients. She also accepts hand lettering projects. To know more about Erica and her works, she's on Facebook,...
Art

CAPTURED: Split seconds between dreaming and waking

Martin Stranka is an award-winning professional photographer from Prague, Czech Republic. Stranka's approach to photography never fails to capture his audience as he tries to etch a unique space located in balance and serenity resulting to images that seem to exist in that narrow window of a few seconds between dreaming and awakening. For a self-taught artist, Stranka has gone quite a long way. His solo and group exhibitions have been seen from South and North America, through Europe, all the way to Asia. His photographs have been exhibited in places such as New York, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Tokyo, Milan, London, Miami, Paris, Prague, Hong Kong, Kiev and many more. He has created book covers for the biggest New York publishers, such as Harper Collins Publishers and Sterling Publishing. In addition, he has collaborated with other book publishers, music publishers, and artists around the world. Visit his website, Facebook, and Instagram for more of his stunning...
Art

Yayoi Kusama and the interesting story behind her art

Yayoi Kusama could just be one of the, if not the most, legendary living artists we have today. This 87-year-old Japanese virtuoso has worked in a variety of media including painting, collage, sculpture, installations, performance art, film, and writing. Most, if not all, of her works revolve around her thematic interest in psychedelic colors, repetition, and pattern. Kusama's inspiration in creating is quite unusual. Her art is largely influenced by how she wants her viewers to get a glimpse and understanding of how her reality looks like. Interestingly, this artist has experienced hallucinations and severe obsessive thoughts since childhood which often is suicidal in nature. This can be due to the physical abuse she suffered from her mother as a small child. It was earlier in her career that she discovered what eventually became her trademark -- polka dots, or infinite nets as she calls them. For her, art is therapy and she describes herself as an obsessive...
Art

Tray tables of Delta Airlines aircraft come alive with colorful drawings of vibrant cities

Passengers of one of Delta Airlines' Boeing 767 planes will be in for a treat when they assume their places on the aircraft. Right on the tray tables in front of the, they will see vibrant drawings by a number of artists commissioned by the airline as part of an initiative to celebrate the liveliness and culture of several cities around the world. The artworks in the project, which was mounted in cooperation with Coca-Cola, feature the artists' interpretation of life in London, Sao Paulo, Shanghai, Los Angeles, Paris, Mexico City, and Seoul, among others. Some of the artists who took part in the campaign are Stevie Gee, who depicted Los Angeles; Alex Yanes, who drew Sao Paulo; Ping Zhu, who tackled Shanghai; Pedro Campiche, who made an artistic representation of New York City; Sac Magique, who submitted a collage-like drawing of Amsterdam; and Yulia Brodskaya, who took on Seoul. Their drawings appear below in the order that they were mentioned. The original trays are...
Art

Science appreciated through art, art appreciated through science in ‘Science as Art’

The “Science as Art” exhibit is a one-of-a-kind event that will run until March 3 at the Washington State Legislative Building. It will continue from March 6 to April 8 at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle. This has been an annual exhibition that featured images courtesy of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "I always really like science as art because it lets you show something in a way that is more universally relatable. You don't have to have a technical background to be interested," says Nicole Overman, a materials engineer who captured the tungsten-copper alloy's close-up. The researchers at PNNL have been selecting, coloring, and submitting images for the Science as Art event since 2010. John LaFemina, the laboratory director, said, "We had all these images that were too interesting and too beautiful to hide in a drawer somewhere." And thus, the yearly tradition was born - and the rest of the country is now enjoying these exceptional...
Architecture

Illustrations pay homage to the rough beauty of Brutalist architecture

Eschewing refinement, Brutalist architecture was both a reaction to the style that came before it and a necessity of the times. The movement, characterized by ruggedness and bulk and which saw its glory from the 1950s through the 1970s, rejected the flair and finesse of 1930s and 1940s architecture and, at the same time, answered the need for inexpensive structures which resulted from the economic depression that followed the Second World War. Because of its disregard for comfort, at least in a visual sense, Brutalism -- whose name is derived from the French word "brut," which means raw -- has often been overlooked, notwithstanding the appreciation it got for its straightforwardness and utilitarian quality. In recent years, however, Brutalism has experienced a resurgence in popularity. The Brutalist idiom is once again being showcased, discussed and analyzed, on the Internet, in books, and even in film, such as the 2015 dystopian feature "High Rise." Brutalism...
Art

Artists from all over the world converge in the Centre for Computing History to create Teletext art

Teletext seems like an ancient relic to most of us. But just recently, artists from all over the world came together in an event to create Teletext art. They met in Cambridge at the Centre for Computing History, reveling in the wonder of the artform. For these people, this is not all old news - instead, it is a current, exciting, and real way to express themselves. They spent an entire weekend celebrating this unique form of art in a congregation known as the "Block Party". Raquel Meyers, a Swedish artist who has been amazed in using Teletext as an art form since 2012, explained: “It isn’t something you can make a profit from, so you can actually play with it. The idea is to show to people that you can do really crazy things and be really creative with something that’s supposed to be limited.” See the celebration and learn more about Teletext from the museum's website. ...
Art

Vandalism turns into something marvelous thanks to local artists’ hard work and creativity

Richard Miller owns a variety store and received a notice to clean up the parking lot beside his property, which was teeming with graffiti. He initially thought that the graffiti was actually pretty good, but got excited when some local artists opened up about ideas with him. The artists are members of Art for Art's Sake (AFAS), a group that promotes expression through art. “Originally the plan was to put framework around the graffiti to show that we support the artistic pieces that can be created through graffiti. I discussed it with a few artists and the artists started incorporating their own designs into the letters that were already there,” said artist Stewart Knight. Artist Sarah Hensley said, “I didn’t want to cover up or totally remove the graffiti. We got our friends involved and now it is this huge crazy art wall, and it looks really cool. I kept the graffiti in my art. People kept walking by to see it and said that looks like fun.” ...
Architecture

Critiquing ideas of national identity and globalization using caged taxidermied birds and an upside-down tree

"Question the Wall Itself," a new exhibition at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, is all about the capacity to interrogate symbols and their (varied) meanings. As its title might suggest, the show features installations that poses, and arouses, questions on customary notions of space, both within and beyond a structure -- not only in a physical sense but, more importantly, in a psychological and political one. In the interactions between the works and the viewers, these notions are expected to be challenged or even reconstructed, making beholders reflect on, or perhaps cast a doubtful look at,  their own perceptions of belonging and identity. What belongs to whom? Does anything really rightfully constitute exclusivity of ownership? One of the works exhibited is Rosemarie Trockel’s "As far as possible." The work is composed of taxidermied birds in a cage and a palm tree hanging from the ceiling, along with other exoticized objects. Fionn Meade, artistic...
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