Category: Architecture

Architecture

Mesmerizing helicopter views of Los Angeles by Dylan Schwartz

Taken from high above the city, Dylan Schwartz's aerial photography is mesmerizing. The creative Director and photographer based out of Los Angeles frequently takes helicopter rides at dawn and dusk, capturing breathtaking views of towering skyscrapers, bridges, and sports complexes. The cinematic shots often feature LA landmarks such as the Hollywood sign and familiar locations like Chinatown. It's almost like the viewer is part of the experience of cruising above the horizon and taking in the sights. Check out some of the glorious shots below and find more on his Instagram and website. ...
Architecture

The Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival is back, and 2017’s sculptures are bigger than ever

We have previously covered a story about the very same festival, back in 2013. The annual festival is coming soon this year, and the sculptures are crazier and bigger than ever. Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival is a tourist attraction for both local and foreign vacationers because it provides something completely new. Sure, we've all seen snow and ice one way or another, but what about ice sculptures that are bigger than life? Probably not. As you can see in the photos below, the festival takes a LOT of manpower, planning, and preparation to execute properly. And topping the previous years' already successful runs can be a humongous challenge to take. This festival isn't just about sculptures and lights towering among us, however. The very first ice lantern and sculpture dates back to ancient China, so this event is somehow giving us a glimpse of what life was back then. Today, people from all over the world come together to bask in the culture, art, and festivities...
Architecture

Unique cover art by legend M.C. Escher for most beloved classic books

M.C. Escher is one of the rare left brain-inclined artists of all time. Even long after his passing, his works continue to grace the cover of books, magazines, nonfictions, and even albums. For this reason, many publishers use his art for books that they think can be marketed towards the more "logical" of the reading audience, since the artist spent half of his career in mathematics and the other half in art. His pieces depict possibly unseen worlds through his lithographs, mezzotints, and woodcuts - using concepts from math to reflect "infinity" in ways no other artist has been able to. He made the viewer think and ponder, not just appreciate aesthetic. This Dutch artist has been published in who knows how many nonfiction publications, fantasy and sci-fi magazines, and of course, has had his work used as cover art for the most renowned books of our time. These include one edition of Edwin Abbott's Flatland, Clive Barker’s The Damnation Game, and George Orwell’s 1984...
Architecture

Breathtaking architecture of the Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg

The Elbphilharmonie in Hamburg is going to be officially open in January 2017. Since the Elphirhamonie have been finished; there are lines of people waiting to get inside and see at least it's halls and the balcony. The Elbphilharmonie has three concert halls, a hotel, apartments, and a public square with a total height of 110 meters. This building is certainly the most interesting architectural novelty in Germany this year. For more detailed information and upcoming concerts check the official website. ...
Architecture

Artist spray paints intricate floor patterns to mimic traditional Catalan works

Awesome tiles in rundown places. That's how you get someone's attention. Javier De Riba is an artist with a knack for spray painting over floors and walls with intricate geometric patterns. It's amazing how perfectly crisp the patterns are at the edges because they're nearly indistinguishable from ones traditionally found in Catalan homes. Strategically placed in derelict, abandoned places, De Riba's pieces effectively impact the viewer upon first sight. Check out some of his works below and find more on both his website and Etsy. [caption id="attachment_74456" align="alignnone" width="950"] [/caption]  ...
Architecture

Installation provokes feelings of spring in the courtyard of Montpellier hotel

In 2015, pink and white hues took over the courtyard at the Hôtel de Griffy in Montpellier, France. The installation was an attempt at recreating the feeling of spring indoors with hues mimicking that of cherry blossoms as they descend from the ceiling. The six-day installation, titled “Un dixième Printemps (the 10th Spring),” was created by Margaux Rodot, Benoit Tastet, and Mickaël Martin. Drawing inspiration from Japanese tradition, Hanami, where an abundance of blooming flowers are found across the country from the end of March to early May, the installation was incredibly effective and won the 2015 Jury Award. Check it out below and learn more here. ...
Architecture

Architect designs the best treehouse we have ever seen

24-year-old architect and environmental advocate Aibek Almassov from Kazakhstan has been looking for the optimal solution to create homes without destroying trees and forests. After more than three years of hard work, the young founder of A. Masow Architects and Design Studio has finally come up with his version of saving the future generations: a unique "tree in a home" design. This is not your typical treehouse. The eco-home will involve modern and futuristic elements, but the biggest wow factor is, of course, the large tree found at its very center. The exterior walls are not just regular glass - they are coated with transparent solar cells which power the entire home and provide heat, using nothing less than a Tesla battery. Aside from solar energy, the home will also collect and purify natural rainwater for bathing and other needs. All drinking water will be recycled and purified, too. The roots will collect water naturally, which is made possible by the narrow...
Architecture

Before Google: the lost art of real estate maps

Remember when everything was much simpler? There was a time when we did not rely on technology or the internet. There was no Google to give us instant results for every single thing that we need. This included maps. These days, you can simply take your phone and type in a place and you'll get an instant map on your screen. It's impossible to get lost as long as you have cellular coverage. This is a nice moment to look back at the simplicity of the past. Even though it was a lot less convenient, it can't be helped to feel nostalgic and eerily proud of how talented manual labor is. Men and women actually drew maps using their bare hands. Just ink on paper. No fancy software and digital tools to help them out. Minneapolis is a great case in point. Its nice aerial views of buildings, streets, and highways are best appreciated when seen through these old school real estate maps. It's no bluff that these, in their own humble ways, are real pieces of art. ...
Architecture

These are the most amazing sand castles ever

Fresh takes on sand castles were nearly extinct until Calvin Seibert saved the bygone pastime through a contemporary twist. The professional sculptor spent a large part of his summer on Rockaway Beach in Queens, where he erected several architectural models. Each one of them is stylized to look a certain way and could very well belong to a different time period. The variety is awesome and so is their massive scale. Seibert describes his process, "Building 'sandcastles' is a bit of a test. Nature will always be against you and time is always running out. Having to think fast and to bring it all together in the end is what I like about it. I rarely start with a plan, just a vague notion of trying to do something different each time." Check out some of his architectural models below and find more lots more on Flickr. ...
Architecture

Architect sketches iconic cities onto moon-sized spheres

Is it me or is this trend of making planet-shaped photos going viral? Amer TendToTravel is a London-based architect with an amusing ongoing series called, "Globes," in which the architect sketches iconic landmarks of popular cities into moon-sized spheres. It's like you're looking at them through a fish-eye lens. The skyscrapers range from cities like Paris, Hong Kong, and Melbourne. The use of focal points is wonderful here as your eyes travel from one building to the next, admiring the exquisite details put into each piece. Check out some of the globes below and find more his website and Instagram. ...
Architecture

Retro glamour in Leo’s Oyster bar

Leo’s Oyster bar is a relatively new hot spot in San Francisco. It “smells” retro with the botanical wallpaper, black and white tiles and floral decoration all around the place. The designer of the restaurant is San Francisco-based designer Ken Fulk. “Quintessentially masculine space that introduces tension with feminine qualities,” says Fulk for the midcentury dining room. Owners of this place Anna Weinberg and James Nicholas have created definitely a unique experience for their customers. For more information about the restaurant, its history, and the menu, check out their website here. ...
Architecture

Artist creates unique kinetic architecture from paper everyday for a year

We've seen 365-day long projects before where creatives challenge themselves to produce unique works every day for a year. Artist Charles Young did the same, but for him, it involved creating intricate paper sculptures to explore different architectural forms. Even after his self-imposed 365-days were up, he kept going and now he's made about 635 buildings. Each structure comprises of moving parts that Young animates and shares regularly on Tumblr. The entire city will be on display from November 10-26, 2016 at the NEoN Digital Arts Festival in Dundee, Scotland. Check it out below! ...
Architecture

Hundreds of steel rods make up these deceiving architectural sculptures

Steel rods wouldn't be your first choice when trying to make architectural models with just one material. But David Moreno chose just that. The Spanish artist used hundreds of steel rods and coils of piano wire to construct architectural sculptures that look as if they were 2D illustrations. The rows of house-like buildings are purposely made to look like uneven collections of sticks. Moreno deliberately wanted to link each sculpture with 2D drawing as part of his stylized process of "trying to draw sculptures." Check out some of the models below and find more of his work on Behance. ...
Architecture

A Cirque du Soleil-themed amusement park is on its way!

We don't know much about the project since everything is still very 'hush-hush' but what we do know sounds amazing! It's going to be built in the Vidanta resort in Nuevo Vallarta, Mexico and is internally referred to as "The Park." There will be daylong performances set across beautifully-designed, lush and green sets. The park will offer a blend of immersive entertainment and the luxury vacationing experience that Vidanta is known for. Three hotels fitted with a range of amenities like a "VIP hydrotherapy circuit for adults, experiential and interactive entertainment experiences, and embedded CDS actors." Check out some of the concept work below and head on over here to learn more! ...
Architecture

Poland’s new bike lanes use the Sun for power and light up at night

Bike lanes are either a blessing or a nuisance. Some creative urban planners in Lidzbark Warminski, Poland have found a way to remedy this two-sided issue. Using  crystal-like particles of phosphor called ‘luminophores,’ urban planners from TPA Instytut Badań Technicznych Sp. z o.o, have created a bike path that lights up when the Sun goes down. The crystals charge up in sunlight and require no external power source. The path can be discerned from a pedestrian-only sideway thanks to some clever symbols. The project has entered the test phase where experts see how regular wear and tear is handled by the luminosphores. Check out images of the path below and head on over here to learn more. ...
Architecture

Breathtaking projection of the universe adorns ceiling of Paris cathedral

Saint-Eustache Church in Paris is the setting for a fantastic light show by Miguel Chevalier. Created as part of Nuit Blanche 2016, the projection-based installation is housed inside the church in Paris and is called, "Voûtes Célestes." The light show cycled through 35 colored networks, lighting up the ceiling in a variety of patterns including a breathtaking sky chart with swirling universes. The backdrop is then accentuated by Baptiste-Florian Marle-Ouvrard's dreamy scores on the organ. Watch the production work below and find more from Chevalier on his website.  ...
Architecture

Japanese chapel architecture inspired by hands in prayer

You don't expect to stumble upon incredible architecture on a random walk through the woods. Yet, the Sayama Forest Chapel exists and delivers just that. The three-year-old building, designed by Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP, was designed to imitate a star and two hands pressed in prayer when viewed from above. The chapel is inspired by the traditional Japanese structural form, “Gassho-zukuri.” The aim of the project was to create a welcoming traditional venue that still allows room for the surrounding forest to grow and retain its shape. Nakamura, while talking to Yellowtrace said, "For those who are in deep grief and inconsolable, how can architecture nurture them? With this in mind, I designed buildings that gently surround them and support their intentions." Check out some images of the structure below and find more splendid works from the group on their website. ...
Architecture

Massive zeppelin-like structure “lands” atop Prague art museum

Zeppelins are arguably very cool in general, in-flight or not.  Fortunately for zeppelin lovers, the Dox Center for Contemporary Art in Prague has just added another zeppelin to the world - and perhaps best of all, you can actually go inside it! Measuring in at about 138-feet, the tube-like structure sits atop the Center and is meant to serve as a public space for readings, performances, and debates. The space can seat up to 120 people comfortably and was designed as part of a collaborative effort between the center’s founder, Leos Valka, and architect Martin Rajnis. "Our aim for the world of contemporary art is to spread and get partially interconnected with the world of literature," Valka told AP, adding that "it’s a world of pure imagination, a children’s world." Check out some images below and find process photos on Pinterest, Google Photos, and on Facebook. ...
Architecture

Creepy, illuminated anglerfish lurks over dark stairwell in Norway

Site-specific graffiti is very popular nowadays and this wonderful piece by Skurk exhibits  many of the reasons for why that is. The Norway-based artist used two light fixtures of a stairwell as the point of origin for an illustrative monochromatic piece depicting a scary anglerfish. This is especially relevant with Halloween just around the corner. At night when the lights come on, that's when the magic truly happens as the yellow hues from the fixtures scatter perfectly across the fish, bringing the piece to life. Check out the piece below and find more of his work on Instagram. ...
Architecture

Dreamlike gothic architecture depicted in striking watercolor illustrations

Gothic architecture and watercolor never looked as good together as they do in artist Sunga Park’s new sketchbook! The Bangkok-based illustrator and graphic designer travels throughout Europe observing Gothic architecture, which comes to life in her watercolor illustrations. Her latest works feature the finest details found in some of the glorious buildings on the streets of Croatia. As the paint bleeds on from one drawing to the next, one can't help but admire the hazy imagery. Here are some of her latest illustrations. If you'd like to see more, follow Park on Instagram and on Behance. ...
Architecture

There’s now a robotic system to maximize your apartment space

Are you suffering from the woes of a cramped apartment? A breakthrough robotic technology will solve those problems in the blink of an eye. Ori Systems' robotic organizational units fold and unfold effortlessly before your eyes, turning small spaces in completely different rooms in just seconds. The transformation seems magical, as you move walls and furniture with the touch of a button and bedrooms become living rooms or  walk-in closets. See more of this ingenious system on their website, twitter, or vimeo. ...
Architecture

Chaotic watercolor grids depict brilliant abstract architectural renderings

Abstract architecture depicted using watercolors is certainly a match made in artistic heaven in the recent works by Jacob van Loon. The Colorado artist alludes to architectural renderings in his works that combine watercolor and  abstract geometric patterns in perspective. The dense lines spectacularly feature color bleeding through borders in a chaotic fashion. In an interview with The Creator’s Project, van Loon said, "When I’m ready for color, it’s not just about pragmatically filling in the spaces, it’s about putting paint down, letting it travel in the valleys and ridges, and seeing where and how it all comes to rest." Check out his latest work below and find more beautiful grids on his Instagram and Behance. ...
Architecture

10,000 solar panels in Nevada captured brilliantly in sunset photos

Solar panels make for some serious eye candy when arranged so neatly. Conserving energy never looked so beautiful. Chicago-based photographer Reuben Wu photographed the Nevada SolarReserve, which groups together over 10,000 mirrors and serves to power nearly 75,000 homes day and night. The brilliant colors during sunset are made so much better with the reflective panels in view. Wu recently won a grand prize in Photo District News’ The Great Outdoors Photo Contest for "Lux Noctis." Check out some of his latest photos below and find more on Instagram and Facebook. ...
Architecture

100-year-old house in Finland covered in pink crochet

When most people think of crochet, the first thing that probably comes to mind is a sweater or afghan. However, one artist in Finland had the idea for the medium that was absolutely larger than life. The artist, known as Olek, covered an entire two-story house from roof to floorboards in pink crochet. The yarn-infused installation, located in Kerava, Finland, was installed on a 100-year-old house. Olek writes "Originally, this building, built in the early 1900s, was the home of Karl Jacob Svensk (1883-1968). In 2015, more than 21 million people were forced to leave their homes in order to flee from conflicts. The pink house, our pink house is a symbol of a bright future filled with hope; is a symbol us coming together as a community." Check out the pink house below and find more photos and videos Instagram.  ...
Architecture

Etsy’s newly designed office space

Architecture firm Gensler has designed office space for both Facebook and AirBnB. In a recent project, the company was commissioned by Etsy to create offices from industrial building that was once used by Jehovah’s Witnesses to print materials. Located in the DUMBO neighborhood of Brooklyn, the new space was photographed by Garrett Rowland. In furnishing the space, the company turned to its network of artisans, resulting in about half of the 200,000-square-foot space being filled with handmade goods that were made locally. The lead designer, Amanda Carroll, said, “The emphasis on furniture was three times that of a regular project.” She added, “We had furniture meetings every single week, which is not normal.” ...
Architecture

Japan opens museum dedicated to models of iconic architecture

Have you ever heard of a dedicated storage facility for architectural models. Japan’s got one in Tokyo’s Shinagawa district. The Archi-Depot essentially functions as a museum for architectural models and was created by the Warehouse TERRADA company. Some of the city’s top attractions such as the Tokyo Skytree, Tokyo International Airport, and the Asakusa Culture and Tourism Center can be admired in their miniature forms. The museum interior is about 17-feet-tall and each model features a QR code that visitors can use to find more information. There’s lots in-store for admirers of the craft, including some prototypes for the 2020 World Olympics stadium designed by Kengo Kuma. ...
Architecture

Installation of pinwheels demonstrates a community’s interconnection

The Pinwheel Pavilion is a temporary architecture installation at London’s Museum Gardens. Created by Five Line Projects Design and Research Office, the project won the Archtriumph Summer Pavilion Competition in 2016. With thousands of wooden wheels supported by steel pillars, the design is based on interconnection so that the push of a single wheel will turn its adjacent wheel, and on and on. The concept explores the relationship between the individual and community, and how much impact a single action can have. Based in East London, Five Line is an interdisciplinary studio of architects and designers that describe themselves as “constantly curious and creative[ly] driven.” ...
Art Creativity Photography Design Sculpture Funny Illustration Video Inspiration Digital Graphic Design Industrial design Fashion Architecture Technology Street art Painting Furniture Retro News Interior Design Vintage Music Artwork Typography Logo design Nature Performance Cute Animation Books Web design Food and Beverage Textile Culture Sponsored