Category: Architecture

Architecture

Marcel Breuer’s legacy in architecture and design is remembered in photos at the Met Breuer

The Met Breuer, the iconic museum in Manhattan, New York, formerly known as the Whitney Museum of American Art, has commissioned photographers Luisa Lambri and Bas Princen to take photos of some of the renowned works of the museum's namesake and architect, Marcel Breuer (1902-1981). Now exhibited at "Breuer Revisited: New Photographs," the museum's first architecture exhibition under its new name, Lambri and Princen's works capture the modernist spirit of Breuer's approach to architecture and as well as pay tribute  to the visionary quality of his oeuvre. Lambri and Princen took compelling snapshots of four of Breuer's landmark buildings, namely the Saint John’s Abbey Church in Collegeville, Minnesota, the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, the IBM Research center in La Gaude, France, and, fittingly, the Met Breuer, which is renowned particularly for its form as an inverted ziggurat. The photos are characterized by their masterful employment of chiaroscuro,...
Architecture

Handcrafted and industrial materials woven into highly expressive and functional pieces

The Philadelphia Museum of Art is currently having an exhibition entitled Design Currents. It opened last November and will continue to run until the 12th of March. The exhibit is the culmination of the work of three contemporary designers, Oki Sato, Faye Toogood, and Zanini de Zanine. All of them use handcrafted and industrial materials, turning them into functional and expressive pieces of art. The event creates a bridge between context and creativity. It gives us an insider look at the distinct culture of each designer, who all come from different countries. At the same time, we learn how collaboration and experimentation can help us improve our relationship with different objects. The event creates a bridge between context and creativity. It gives us an insider look at the distinct culture of each designer, who all come from different countries. At the same time, we learn how collaboration and experimentation can help us improve our relationship with different...
Architecture

Homogenous restaurant designed “like a fallen tree” takes shape in a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Primarily designed for a competition back in 2015, the Oberhulz Mountain Hut, a restaurant made entirely out of locally-sourced wood, has just opened to the public. The winning cantilevered design is constructed 6500 feet high in the Dolomites Mountain Range, one part of the Italian Alps identified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The elegant structure is true to its main concept – purposely following the mountain’s slope and spreading out like three branches of a fallen tree. The interiors of these branches are just as significant and expressive as the façade. Each section is separated from the other with protruding wood trusses that extend their lengths from the ceiling down to the walls. This classic structural design, in turn, transforms the three sections into intimate pockets and, with the use of a glass wall façade, offers users uninterrupted views of the surroundings. All furniture used is made of local oak. The homogenous architecture is a nod to the...
Architecture

Illustrations pay homage to the rough beauty of Brutalist architecture

Eschewing refinement, Brutalist architecture was both a reaction to the style that came before it and a necessity of the times. The movement, characterized by ruggedness and bulk and which saw its glory from the 1950s through the 1970s, rejected the flair and finesse of 1930s and 1940s architecture and, at the same time, answered the need for inexpensive structures which resulted from the economic depression that followed the Second World War. Because of its disregard for comfort, at least in a visual sense, Brutalism -- whose name is derived from the French word "brut," which means raw -- has often been overlooked, notwithstanding the appreciation it got for its straightforwardness and utilitarian quality. In recent years, however, Brutalism has experienced a resurgence in popularity. The Brutalist idiom is once again being showcased, discussed and analyzed, on the Internet, in books, and even in film, such as the 2015 dystopian feature "High Rise." Brutalism...
Architecture

David Burdeny captures Italy’s breathtakingly decadent interiors

Italy is widely known for its rich and opulent architecture. But none has ever captured this grand architectural era in its full glory and color – until David Burdeny. An interior design and architecture graduate of the University of Manitoba, David Burdeny has now turned his attention into appreciating the structure, colors, and materials through photography. Just like his former photographic venture focusing on Moscow’s subway station, this project was pursued to give an ode to Italy’s long forgotten but still decadent interior design. It is like walking into a history class on Italy’s early architecture. The collection shows the ceiling murals and paintings, the intricate craftsmanship of sculpture and molding, the huge foyers and hallways adorned with sophisticated and opulent furniture. Italy’s wealthy days has truly been captured in Burdeny’s photo series. Burdeny would like to think that “there is a mystery at the heart of all my photographs,...
Architecture

Critiquing ideas of national identity and globalization using caged taxidermied birds and an upside-down tree

"Question the Wall Itself," a new exhibition at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, is all about the capacity to interrogate symbols and their (varied) meanings. As its title might suggest, the show features installations that poses, and arouses, questions on customary notions of space, both within and beyond a structure -- not only in a physical sense but, more importantly, in a psychological and political one. In the interactions between the works and the viewers, these notions are expected to be challenged or even reconstructed, making beholders reflect on, or perhaps cast a doubtful look at,  their own perceptions of belonging and identity. What belongs to whom? Does anything really rightfully constitute exclusivity of ownership? One of the works exhibited is Rosemarie Trockel’s "As far as possible." The work is composed of taxidermied birds in a cage and a palm tree hanging from the ceiling, along with other exoticized objects. Fionn Meade, artistic...
Architecture

SXSW 2017 to showcase enthralling installations under new art program

South by Southwest has indeed grown so much from its beginnings in 1987. Evidence of that is its upcoming exhibition of five art installations under the new SXSW Art Program, which launches in March, during the conglomerate's music and film festivals and conferences for this year. Both budding and known artists will take part in the program. Among them is Los Angeles-based artist Refik Anadol, whose work titled "Infinity Room" will be showcased. The work is made up of a space that transforms a beholder's view of reality into a "three-dimensional space of visualization." Speaking of the new program, SXSW chief programming officer Hugh Forrest said, "Art and Design [have] always been central to the SXSW ethos, and we have quickly become a recognized platform for visual artists to showcase art installations and connect with filmmakers, musicians, and technologists. The Art Program is the first time we have formalized the program and sought leading artists to design...
Architecture

From the young boy in the backyard to “rattan’s first virtuoso”

A multi-awarded furniture designer and manufacturer from Cebu, Philippines, Kenneth Cobonpue made a name both in the local and international for his unique designs and roster of clientele that include names such as Queen Sophia of Spain and Brad Pitt.  Cobonpue’s trademark is the integration of locally sourced materials with innovative handmade production processes. His craft is recognized by different award-giving bodies around the globe like the American Society of Interior Design and French Coup de Couer to name a few. His designs have also appeared in films, music videos, and US TV series. In 2007, Kenneth was named by TIME magazine as “rattan’s first virtuoso”. Kenneth was born in a Chinese family and was initially encouraged by his father to take up a business course. But his love for designing was developed at an early age when he used to play with various materials and create furniture pieces at his mother’s backyard factory. Although he followed...
Architecture

700-year-old sacred tree located in a Japanese train station

Kayashima Station in the Northeast suburbs of central Osaka, Japan hosts a 700-year-old tree. The massive camphor tree has been around for centuries and is associated with a deity. The station first opened in 1910 and was soon plagued by overcrowding. Officials planned to remove the tree completely but all efforts were halted by locals fuelled by their belief in the tree's holy powers. It is said that a man who cut off one of its branches developed high fever the next day. The new station was completed in 1980 with the tree standing tall even to this day. Check out some images of the station below! ...
Architecture

‘Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints’ – the beauty of abandonment

‘Take nothing but pictures and leave nothing but footprints’, this is a simple rule that leads photographer Valerie Leroy through her adventures. Usually, with a group of friends, she travels around the Brussels with an aim to discover places and objects that once were made and used by humans and now are abounded. Although the experience is unforgettable and the risk worth it, one should be careful when stepping inside an old dusty house of industrial complex. To do this kind of hobby or job, one has to be a daredevil. Going to abounded places can be creepy and illegal too. Valery is deeply in love with the beauty of abandonment and respects all that she finds in front of her curious eyes. Abandoned trains, abandoned factories, abandoned hotels, houses and much more to be explored on Valerie’s blog and Instagram. ...
Architecture

Historic plans and drawings from the Nazi era available online at the Library of Congress

Roman Totenberg, a Polish violinist, was an immigrant who came to America in 1938. At the time, Europe was widely antisemitic, thanks to the influences of Nazi Germany. Totenberg put in a lot of effort to make sure his family is kept safe from the inevitable force of cataclysm. Previously - in 1935 - his mother joined him until she was also able to escape to the US when the Nazis took over France (1940). Totenberg's efforts, however, were not enough to save his sister Janina Ferster and her family, who were trapped in Warsaw as the war broke out. Janina lost her husband but survived together with her daughter until the Allies won the war. Janina's daughter, Elizabeth Wilk, now gifted the Library of Congress with some of the family's papers to be part of the Totenberg Collection. Vital materials such as documents, drawings, photo albums, letters, and telegrams are proof that they were in Poland before and during the Holocaust. These also serve as evidence of Totenberg's efforts...
Architecture

Ancient and modern cultural symbols blend in Cairo’s City of the Dead

At the sight of graffiti amid a historic site, the usual, or expected, reaction is one of disdain or anger, right? The huge colorful paintings of cartoon characters on the walls of an ancient necropolis in Cairo's City of the Dead, however, are instead drawing interest from locals and tourists alike because of the creative blending of the ancient and the contemporary. And that's exactly the aim of "Outside In: the Art of Inclusion," a project mounted within the 15th century complex built by Mameluk Sultan al-Ashraf Qaitbey which has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site . "What we want to do is to bring together the old heritage, the traditions of this particular place, with creative contemporary art and with various cultural events to promote diversity. Old meets new, death and life come together in the city of the dead, where we can exchange ideas and culture between East and West," Agnieszka Dobrowolska, the Polish architect who leads the project, told Reuters....
Architecture

The greatest architectural project in London that was never built

Mies van der Rohe, one of the influential architects behind the rise of modernist architecture, was very specific with the projects he wanted to design. As opposed to fellow modernists Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright, he insisted on “making the existing city beautiful” rather than creating utopian visions that can also be concluded as fantasies. True to his beliefs, the Mansion House Square was conceived. But it was only after his death that inquiries were made and the design was consequently denied. It was Mies’ classic “skin and bones” architecture with all the meticulously detailed planning and industrial steel. In one smart move, it would have been able to address the complicated traffic grid surrounding the Bank of England. And, adjacent to the City Mayor’s residence, a public square would have been created for the people – an ingenious yet controversial scheme. The discussion about Mies’ unbuilt Mansion House Square still continues on...
Architecture

Urban farming prototype Growroom appeared in Copenhagen’s 2016 Chart Art Fair

Growroom, an artistic project made to answer the demands of urban farming, was seen in Copenhagen’s 5th CHART ART FAIR held at the heart of the city. The art event, staged in central Charlottenborg, was established in 2013 with the concept of challenging “the boundaries and experience of a traditional art fair.” Designed by the collaborative community of Space10, Growroom is the first pocket farm of its kind to provide urban solutions for the growing problems of sustainability and demand for fresh produce. With “food producing architecture” in mind, lead architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum designed the spherical greenhouse to enable users to plant and harvest greens and herbs using the built-in plant boxes. It is transportable and compact in size that can transform it into both an artistic display and a food haven in one. Similar to all their other innovative projects, the “future-living lab and exhibition space” Space10’s main purpose...
Architecture

San Francisco: the street mural haven

San Francisco is not labeled the cultural, commercial, and financial center of Northern California for nothing. Have you been to the city? It's a popular tourist destination not only because of its cool summers, steep rolling hills, fantastic architecture and landmarks (hello, Golden Gate Bridge!) but also because of its incredible street art. For the art-loving tourists, a visit to Haight Street, 24th Street, Balmy Alley, Osage Alley, Cypress Street, Lilac Alley, and Clarion Alley will be the best part of the tour. These streets and alleys are highly concentrated with murals and graffitis. The history of this public art in San Francisco goes a long way back. It was Diego Rivera who first took a brush and used the city walls as a canvas for his arts in the 1930s. Other artists followed suit which eventually made the city a global hotspot for outdoor public art. Today, these arts are used as a medium to either send a message (mostly political and social) or to simply...
Architecture

Frames and mirrors are more than just boring implements for French artist Mathias Kiss — they’re the artworks

Frames are objects of utility, there to fulfill practical functions rather than serve any more noble purpose, such as inspiring one to reflect on a given subject, as art is designed to do. But that's not the case for designer Mathias Kiss. For him, a frame, presented in a certain way, can be more than a material used to define the realm of an artwork; it can also be a thing of artistic value in itself in that he can use it to provoke thought. For the French artist, frames -- as well mirrors, which are equally mundane in their existence as implements --  can be artworks, ones that can decidedly go against classicism, as one might expect. "My inspiration comes from a reaction to my historical past, which I confront with fashion, music and with contemporary culture," he told The Globe and Mail. Kiss, born in Hungary, uses his training in painting and classicism as a counterpoint for what he intends to achieve with his art. "It’s the materials and codes of French classicism that I use...
Architecture

The 7th Room is a 33-foot tall treehouse in the Swedish woods

The 7th Room puts a whole new shine on the concept of tree houses. The structure is one of seven cabins available from northern Sweden’s Treehotel and offers a stunning view of the Aurora Borealis. The 7th Room was designed by architecture firm Snøhetta and features a base with black and white images of pine trees that give the illusion of reflection. The 33-foot tall cabin camouflages itself into the surrounding woods and floor-to-ceiling windows provide gorgeous views at all angles. Check it out below and find the other six cabins, like The Mirror Cube, on their website. ...
Architecture

Monochromatic 2D art created with computational tools and code featured in CCA exhibition

The California College of the Arts' (CCA) new Hubbell Street Galleries has recently hosted an exhibition featuring 22 commissioned works which take a closer look at the wide range of possibilities coming from computational tools without style restraints. Entitled “Drawing Codes: Experimental Protocols of Architectural Representation,” it is curated by CCA architecture faculty Andrew Kudless and Adam Marcus, AIA, with Clayton Muhleman. The exhibition focuses on the issues of representation, and this is made possible by limiting the works to 2D and monochrome settings. Also, an essential requirement for the artists was to use code either as a generative constraint, as a language, as a cipher, or as a script. “One of the things that I didn’t necessarily plan or expect is how that even with the focused and highly constrained call that we issued to the participants, the show represents a pretty compelling cross-section through contemporary architectural...
Architecture

Artists come together in clever and touching fundraising effort to help restore the burned-down Glasgow School of Art’s Mackintosh Building

From Grayson Perry to Anish Kapoor to Antony Gormley and several other artists (including Simon Starling, Cornelia Parker, the Chapman brothers and Sir Peter Blake) - there has been an immense number of individuals who stepped up in the Ash to Art project to restore the historic Mackintosh building, which has been gutted by the May 2014 fire. The artworks cleverly use the actual ashes and debris that were left in the wake of the burned-down portions of  Glasgow School of Art. Perry says, “It’s a tragedy. It’s the most famous art school building in Britain. It’s also the masterpiece of [Charles Rennie] Mackintosh. It’s a double tragedy. I was very excited when I received the box of charcoal. I had an idea almost immediately and the idea of making an urn was an obvious thing to do. The idea of memorializing or celebrating the difficulty – honoring the wound. It’s something I’m trying to do. Move on and make the most of it.” Each artist was...
Architecture

London-based company gives chocolates very impressive packaging inspired by actual architecture

Beau Cacao is a one-of-a-kind chocolate company. While most chocolate bars come modestly-wrapped with paper or plastic, with the logo of the brand and simple grooves and cuts, this London-based company looks way beyond all that austerity. Founded back in 2013, the company stands out high and proud from the crowd without breaking a sweat. As you can see in the photos below, the chocolate's packaging requires an intricate design and is unlike most others. This is thanks to Adam Gill, the American designer commissioned to work with the company. Here he creates highly graphic designs, where the chocolate square is not merely a chocolate square. We are also reminded of the Malaysian origins of the cacao beans that are used in creating these treats. With an added dash of modern design and an overall inspired work, taking hints from the country's architecture, the outcome is truly marvelous. ...
Architecture

Industrial pre-fabbed shelter that serves as an all-inclusive modern escape

In a busy generation that synonymizes traveling with the most sought-after luxury retreats, people often forget that nature is in itself an escape. With the use of steel and nature as the frame, Danish bathroom and kitchen company VIPP created a capsule-like shelter that packs all the essentials for a modern retreat. The 55 square meter pre-fabricated shelter is structurally supported with steel and is composed of two levels. The ground floor, which is covered with glass windows on two sides, boasts the bedroom, the kitchen, family room and the bathroom. The upper level has a small storage unit with a loft-type sleeping space for another guest. Nature plays a major role in the shelter’s sustainability. The operable windows are designed to allow natural circulation of air and the black-colored exterior absorbs heat and sunlight when it is hot. A built-in fireplace is also strategically positioned at the center of the shelter to equally distribute heat. The 25-ton...
Architecture

Architect submits designs to convert turn of the century industrial area into eco-village

Vincent Callebaut decided to transform historic Tour & Taxis in Brussels, the complex that was built in 1900 but has now sat for decades and has lost its purpose. Firm Vincent Callebaut Architects have a futuristic but real vision of redesigning this place, imagined with new, ecological standards. Working or living in such a place looks like a paradise. This project proposal is ambitious but would be a great step for the future of architecture and would give courage for further green architecture projects. ...
Architecture

Coral-inspired installation made from 4,600 strips of aluminum

This perforated tubular installation by architect Marc Fornes really lives up the place! Suspended above the Orange County Convention Center (OCCC) in Orlando, Florida, the coral-inspired pathways were designed by Fornes and his studio The Very Many. Created by over 4,600 strips of metal, each piece is just a millimeter thick. In tubular form, however, the material drastically improves in strength to the point where it can be walked on. The studio says, "Borrowing and mismatching elements from the world, pushing them out of scale and hybridizing them to the realm of the bizarre, the structure achieves a familiar yet mysterious quality, at once friendly and alien." Check out some footage of the installation below and find more on their website. ...
Architecture

The Design Museum saw more than 100,000 visitors since November

The Design Museum has seen more than 100,000 guests pass through its doors since November 24. The museum’s show program for 2017 features exhibitions that examine our maturing populace, the unbuilt engineering of Moscow in the 1930s, and a historic point display exploring the counterculture of California. Moving from the previous banana-ripening distribution center in Shad Thames to Kensington High Street has been a costly one – to the tune of around £83 million. to be precise. In any case, with the monetary support from the Adopt an Object campaign and Time for Design sell off, the historical center was able to afford the expensive move into the oldCommonwealth Institute building close to the entrance to Holland Park. The outside of the Design Museum has been made to look like the original blue exterior of the building, while the inside plan is the main real open work of John Dawson. The floorplan takes into account the roots of the old building, which some might...
Architecture

Poho series shows Brutalism style depicted in architecture around the world

Many of these gray giants were built between 1950 und 1970s. This type of architecture is known as Brutalism and was mostly popular in post-war Europe, India, and the Eastern Bloc. Today, many of these buildings are demolished and lie in ruins. However, many are empty and exist as monuments to a bygone era. The monuments constructed in this style are especially interesting in ex-Yugoslavia countries. Brutalism was typically represented in buildings without paint or dressings. In many, they evoke silence, glory, and fear. They definitely stand as the last bastions of an architectural style that reigned during a challenging era for Europe. ...
Architecture

Paper engineer Matthew Shlian is back with amazing new art and promising solo exhibition

We have previously posted a story about Matthew Shlian's amazing paper art a few years ago. But if you're thinking that's all we'll be seeing from the unique sculptor, you couldn't be more wrong. He is back with new artwork that will amaze any audience. On his website, Shlian says, "Researchers see paper engineering as a metaphor for scientific principals; I see their inquiry as a basis for artistic inspiration. In my studio, I am a collaborator, explorer, and inventor. I begin with a system of folding and at a particular moment the material takes over.” And we can definitely see what he means through his new pieces. You can catch more of Shlian's breathtaking paper art at his solo exhibition, titled "Telemetry". The exhibit will be an exploration of the relationship of science and art. It will run until March 2nd, 2017 at the Florida Gulf Coast University. Or you can check out more of his work on his official website, on Instagram, or on Facebook ...
Architecture

Collection of photos caputring plant-filled homes around the world

The following pictures have been collected on Pinterest. All of the houses contain plants in their interiors. It takes more than an ordinary flower lover to create anything that rivals what these real plant enthusiasts have created - they have made little wild gardens inside their houses! Who wouldn’t like to have a house or office like that? It is a healthy and absolutely peaceful surrounding to be in. Take a look. ...
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