Articles by Joshua Tyler Bacon

Who, me? I'm just you average neighborhood article man with a soft spot for macaroons and monster movies. This is my first walk into the Blog jungle, but I also write original works of Fiction, Poetry, and Screenplays.
Art

Disappearing paper sculptures show societal splits in Korean culture

Optical illusions have been famous for centuries, and we’ve all seen one or two. Artist Ho Yoon Shin is employing the technique using viewing angles to challenge perception. His paper sculptures seem to solidify and disappear based on where you stand, forming a haunting visage of the whole sculpture or a layer cake of geometric structure when viewed whole. At first look, I thought his pieces must be suspended by string or fishing line, but Shin coats each piece of paper in Urethane and then interconnects them to create the visual trick. His work is inspired by the social structure he experienced living in Korea. His Buddhas and famous sculptures reflect the two-sided nature of people and the social vacancy he grew to know in Korean society. ...
Creativity

The magnifying spoon solved a problem I never knew I had

Looking at the magnifying spoon for the first time, I wasn’t sure if I should be impressed or laugh. Humor won, but then I started to wonder if I would ever use one. I guess I could use the extra magnification to check my food for contaminants like flies, hair, or razor blades... that must be why Morales made it. It’s part of an ongoing series called 'Object Creations,' the brainchild of designer Ernesto D Morales. The series solves problems that aren’t really problems. But they will make you laugh… with things like a Full Body Moist Towelette or a Rotisserie Patio Table (I’ll let you research that one). I don’t think you can actually buy these products, but would you if you could? That’s the point. ...
Design

Thermoelectric cooling helps bike riders pull drinking water from the air

Bike riders have a very short check list when leaving the house. Remember the helmet, the sunblock, and.... the water bottle. Thanks to industrial design student Kristof Retezár they can check that last one off the list for good. Kristof designed the 'Fontus,' a thermoelectric cooling system that filters moisture from the humid air right into your water bottle. After thirty or so prototypes, Kristof was able to produce a collection rate of about a drop a minute, and in the right conditions that equals about a half-liter per hour. The device seems to be going into the final stages of invention and will soon allow riders to ride even longer. ...
Art

Geometric sculptures made from thousands of fused nails

Finding your medium as an artist can be a long process, but for sculptor John Bisbee the choice came naturally. One day, some thirty years back, while John was scavenging for art parts, he kicked over an old box of nails and marveled at their held shape. Rust had fused them together. You’ve got to admire a man who can find art in a bucket of nails, and even more so for giving it his all and perfecting his craft over a lifetime. Currently an artist in residence at Bowdoin College in Maine, you can see Bisbee's amazing sculptures all across the country. Most of his art is made painstakingly with hours of welding and conceptual fortitude, visually appearing like geometry made of metal. A hard feat to accomplish… For him I suppose it’s easy, donning a welding mask and humming his mantra – “Only nails, always different.” ...
Art

Incredible 3D mosaics made from paper standing on end

At first look, perhaps you didn't even see it. From a thumbnail view it's hard to tell. But that beautiful mosaic is made of more than just ink. Yulia Brodskaya is a Russian-born artist with a particular talent mostly abandon by the time you leave grade school. She creates incredibly detailed and colorful portraits, logos, and whimsical doodles, out of standing strips of paper. Her process is simple: cut and paste. It's the imagination bit that's hard. Brodskaya got her start in the medium when exploring different forms of illustration. Now she's commissioned to design portraits for big names like Starbucks and Godiva. Her attention to detail and proclivity for bright, expressive colors, makes her a stand out, but it's her eye for theme and emotion that will keep her around for years. ...
Creativity

Photos find vertical vantage points revealing the beauty in urban monotony

Hong Kong is a packed house. With a population of over seven million occupants living in cramped urban skyscrapers, the architectural aim was obviously for space, not beauty. But photographer Peter Stewart took the time to look, examine every angle, and perhaps when he had exhausted all options, still not finding his perfect frame, he finally looked up. His new series entitled ‘Stacked – Hong Kong’ explores the less seen snapshots of this dense urban landscape and reinvents them as a mesmerizing sight to behold. “All it takes really is a keen eye for finding the beauty in the monotonous,” explains Stewart. He reminds us that incredible vistas aren’t confined to far away landscapes, ancient ruins, or freshly minted Mother Nature, but are all around us, if you take the time to find the view. ...
Art

Creative illustrator designs funny motifs through cartoon collaborations

Ben Chen has been in the game for a while, and chances are you’ve seen his work. He’s been a part of Threadless since 2009, so you can see his designs adorning T-shirts across the globe and even own one for a small price. And you should want to... With comic themes mashing together some of your favorite cartoons and pop culture characters, I haven’t seen one yet that hasn’t made me chuckle. Each illustration carries a thematic muted color palette and a playfully simplistic style. But his true power isn’t in the drawings, it’s in the wit. Crossing themes from Mario Bros. to Cast away, you get a whole new look at some old favorites with the help of his creative cross cutting. Wait till you get to the one with Mr. Potato. ...
Art

Wheel-thrown sculptures use rings of color to describe space

The technical term is ceramicist, something I didn’t know until researching Mr.Matthew Chambers. Chambers is a true artisan and so his works don’t really look like anything you’d see in grandma’s china cabinet. He’s also an artist not trying to chase the practical; he’s in love with the process. So suffice it to say you won’t see any of his work on your dinner table either. He works out of a humble 215 square foot studio, doing all his work from his mind with no sketches or designs to guide him. Each of his bowls, or any product for that matter, originates on the potter’s wheel through spontaneity and a trained eye. It’s amazing to see works such as this, intricate, precise, geometric shapes, and know there was no computer help or prior planning. On display often, his last showing was at New Craftsman Gallery. ...
Art

Other worldly illustrations that use old drawings as new canvases

I'm not really sure where to begin. Is it art imitating art? Art transforming life? These thoughts and more were the result of an interesting new series from artist Mattias Leutwyler called 'Behind the Glory.' At first glance it may not be apparent, but each of his new drawings is a collaboration with another artist. Matt stopped by a thrift store at some point and picked up some old prints, by G. Lory and some other illustrators, with a strange idea. He wanted to use what was already there and create something new, so he painted over them, selectively. He has carefully woven together the two in a creative tapestry of mystery and wonder. His complete works are on display this fall at Stadtcafé Sursee. ...
Architecture

See the inner workings of the once, most densely populated place on the planet

Most people have never heard of Kowloon City, a large housing structure in Hong Kong that was once known as the most densely populated area on the planet. Demolished in the early '90s to combat Triad occupation, crime, drugs, and prostitution, many thought the intricacies of the Seussian style buildings were lost forever. Little did people know, measurements and pictures were taken to document the disjointed city. This information came together in a mesmerizing book of illustrations compiled to remember the wild city that once was. The illustrations reveal an astonishing and somewhat scary cross section of a once uncluttered military base. Built up by unknown architects and occupants alike, the structure grew to a towering and highly cluttered beehive of activity. Taking a look at each picture I can only imagine how dwellers felt in the compact city. Was it home, or prison? ...
Art

Thanksgiving plates imagine the bizarre eating habits of famous artists

Whether you're picky or porky, we all have a way of filling our plates at Thanksgiving. It’s the power of repetition, I suppose, and we’ve all been working on it since we were tikes, barely able to see over the turkey. So it makes you wonder… “How did Van Gogh fill his plate on Thursday?” Well I didn’t, but San Francisco-based artist Hannah Rothstein did, and went about recreating those turkey feasts through the eyes of some very famous artists. Tackling greats from Warhol to Pollock, Rothstein recreated their meals with an artist’s flair. Although it would have been nice to see Rothstein change up the food and go a bit further with place settings and environment, each plate transcends food and becomes fun and edible art. Jackson Pollock René Magritte Pablo Picasso Piet Mondrian Andy Warhol Mark Rothko Georges Seurat Vincent van Gogh ...
Art

Long exposure photographs capture the perpetual bustle of Tokyo

New York-based photographer Matthew Pillsbury recently made his second pilgrimage to the flamboyant city of Tokyo. This time he returned with some long exposure photographs that truly amaze. Typically a black and white photographer, Pillsbury couldn’t resist the blazing colors of Tokyo. His long exposure shots entrance with color fragments, light streaks, and ghostly figures. He also captured the frenzied pace of the city and exposed its trending technology. In fact, it was one aim of the series – capturing the booming light of modernity against the dying relics of the past. He said, “temples exist alongside the most popular Disney park and next to a giant Manga robot or a robot restaurant.” ...
Funny

Hand drawn selfies give us a look at the private lives of Disney characters

So the cartoons are taking selfies now… should have known it would come to this. Although I’ve got to say this lot is pretty funny. The selfies are taken by the likes of Ariel, Hercules, Snow White, and more, and come with their own set of hashtags and comments. The illustrations are by artist Simona Bonafini in a collection entitled ‘Selfie Fables.’ The Italian artist clearly has great style and imbues each photo with a watercolor feel and hand drawn lines. The situations she places them in are truly funny as well, from a Peter Pan photo-bomb to a clearly vain Zero to Hero.  ...
Art

Intricate metal tree sculptures twisted to life

Clive Madison is a wire sculptor - something of an ambiguous term, until you sample his work. Madison works with only full length wire strands, never cut, glued, or soldered, but twisted into beautiful manifestations of nature's giants. Each work rests on a representative block of wood, from which these wires flow, like roots themselves, into incredibly detailed trees of all kinds. He’s currently represented at Lee Champman Gallery, and his full collection can be seen here. ...
Digital

This 8-bit throwback series might just reinvigorate your love of the classics

What is it about 8-bit right now? It’s like we’ve gone into a mini retro craze for the stuff, and I gotta admit, I’m not impervious to its blocky charm. "8-bit" accurately refers to processing power and was the standard protocol for most consoles in the '80s and '90s, giving visuals to such classics like Super Mario and Mega Man. Now, 8-bit is a style referring to the blocky nature of those images and the color limitations of the time. Octavi Navarro is a Spanish illustrator and graphic artist that really likes the look. He’s recently created a series called ‘Pixel Art’ made painstakingly, one dot at a time. His work usually contains cross sections, paying homage to one of the classic 2D game viewpoints. But his scenes are off the charts. Almost like an 8-bit Where’s Waldo or retro Sim City, his illustrations feature colorful characters in some very loaded situations. ...
Art

Stunning chandeliers transform spaces with both light and looks

Gone are the days of the old crystal chandelier. They’ve gotten a bit… tacky. But there will always be a need for light fixtures, and although it’s not his only passion, artist Olifur Eliasson has made quite a few. I’m not even sure you can label these as chandeliers. The Icelandic artist creates something more akin to household kaleidoscopes, using a menagerie of colors, glass, and shapes to cast intricate patterns throughout a room. And some of these things are larger than life, being housed in museums, opera houses and private collections. An artist of multiple talents, Eliasson also does photography, sculpture, and uses mediums that span the distance of a very large spectrum. So if you want one, save up. An Eliasson light shade just might set you back a few. ...
Art

The new California T Ferrari gets a neon paint job inside a wind tunnel

If you're a fan of DesignFaves you know who Fabian Oefner is. He's a Swiss photographer with a certain flair for color and visual explosion - sometimes, literally. In his newest project, helping Ferrari explore the feel and emotion of their new California T, his work was a little less explosion, but a lot more colorful. Oefner decided to photograph the illustrious vehicle on the dark backdrops of a wind tunnel. He then pumped gallons of ultra violet paint onto the car and captured the mix. The wind tunnel spattered the car with dazzling streaks of color and twirling beads of neon. The results are simply - eye candy. “The acceleration of the California T into the wind convinced me to reveal the sensation of speed through form, to see the unseen and convert that emotion into a physical art piece,” said Oefner. Check out the eye-popping images of the project below. ...
Art

Disney goes dark in 6 hilarious cartoon character mug shots

It seems like the goof troop has hit a patch of bad luck. Looking like fallen from grace reality pop stars, the whole cast of the Mickey Mouse Club has wound up in jail... With the help of Miami-based graphic illustrator Jose Duran. Duran has created an incredibly laughable, but totally dark, interpretation of some of our favorite Disney characters, lovingly entitled, 'Bad Guys.' Characters like Mickey and Minni, Goofy, and the Ducks, all pose for police mug shots looking like they were dragged out of a dumpster in south Boston. I would not want to meet Donald on the street! I have to laugh at all the graphic remixes that have popped up lately. This one definitely tops the list. ...
Creativity

Romance novel parodies remind us Mustache ‘Movember’ is here

It is officially 'Movemeber' and that means two things. First and foremost, if you are a man, you must grow facial hair. And second, all facial hair counts, from bushy beards, to the pencil thin mustache. It's all for a good cause - raising awareness during the month of November for all kinds of men's health issues such as prostate cancer. This year, Toronto-based creative company BBDO is doing its part with a line of hilarious and manly mustache promos. Each poster is designed like a cheesy romance novel, sporting looks from the classic warrior to a swash buckling pirate. These things are hilarious, so much so in fact, I wish there were more. The promos prompt on-lookers to grow a mustache and 'Be a Hero.' Will you become a steed riding prince charming? Maybe not, but during Movember, you'll definitely be a hero. ...
Art

11 cinemagraphs quietly animate the details of life

There is a new type of photo out there called a Cinemagraph and it’s bridging the gap between photography and film. I first heard of Cinemagraphs through a roughly hashed app about a year ago. If any of my photos had come out like Julien Douvier's, maybe I would have stuck with it. So what is a Cinemagraph? Well, it’s mostly a still frame with one area of looped motion, usually continuously while hiding its seam. So it appears to go on and on forever. And however you create that perfect loop, Douvier has gotten good at it. The French photographer is, first and foremost, a shutterbug and it shows in his often quiet compositions and well-balanced frames. I guess the next thing is to figure out how it hang it... ...
Creativity

Fun illustrations show the two-timing nature of common advice

Advice can be a tricky thing to give and receive. It seems like no matter what problem arises there's some pearl of wisdom from grandpa or a haiku saved from the flaky cage of that fortune cookie to get you through. But how can you possibly trust that? Most advice is little more than opinion or conjecture, and at the very least - a verbal salve to sooth the pain. If you think I'm wrong you'd better check the facts because a new site called 'Tip for Tat' by Moses Inc. backs me up. So before you fall pray to the advice placebo effect, check out the site and make sure you see both sides of the coin. It highlights some of the biggest and most common themes of human hardships and the commonly used phrases that get us through. Who knows, maybe you’ll learn a thing or two… Maybe not. ...
Creativity

Company creates folding cardboard tables with philanthropy in mind

So many work norms have been challenged in recent years. All sorts of things from office hours to attire, and these simple ideas are revolutionizing the way we do business. A New Zealand-based company, Refold, is throwing their word into the refined definition of our workplace structures with a unique and simple desk design. Their desk not only allows for portability and sit/stand options, but supports our environment and the less fortunate too. Refold was created by three buds - Matt, Fraser, and Ollie. Noting the harmful effects of sitting all day, their fledgling project is a stand-up desk. It's made completely of cardboard and folds up in minutes. It's nothing like the moving-box desk I had in my first apartment, this thing can support the weight of a grown man and even has options for height. The company is in the midst of fundraising to expand their reach and has pledged to send these light and practical desks to school children in less fortunate countries. Help them...
Art

A little ‘ink’ reinvents famous stars, both past and present

Cheyenne Randall is a tattoo artist working out of Seattle, Washington, and you should see his customers. The biggest names walk through his door, and impressively... even dead ones. Randall is actually a multi-media artist who has a passion for re-invention. He adds tattoos to some of our favorite stars and recreates their iconic looks. And man, do they look different. That first photo I saw of Elvis with prison tats really had him looking like a bad ass. But unfortunately it all wears thin. Randall only seems to offer one look to all his make-overs, a low down, and sometimes lame, sailor tattoo selection that often leaves you wanting more. It’s incredible to see what some of these people look like with ink, but if they were tailored to the wearer, wow what difference that would make. All in all, Randall is doing something pretty cool here, and I don’t knock his ingenuity and obvious talent. His collection is massive, so waste some time on his site. Trust me, the view is full...
Art

Playful illustrations with humor hiding in the details

There’s something to be said about details. Supposedly holding the ‘Devil,’ details are always piling up to give us a better picture, usually bringing clarity, information and certainty. That is not what I get from these drawings by illustrator Mattias Adolfson. I’m getting something like… OCD of the imagination. Adolfson’s meticulously detailed drawings are an exploration in madness, of the most pleasurable degree. His doodles often depict dizzying worlds, overwhelmingly complex technology, or homes with an over zealous interior decor. The level of detail in his drawings actually forbids you from experiencing his pieces as a whole. I often find myself looking intensely at every nook and cranny. I wonder how long they take? ...
Creativity

The horror classic “Psycho” re-mastered… with pumpkins

Ever seen Psycho? Who am I kidding everyone’s seen Psycho, or at least that really famous shower scene. Made in the 1960’s by Alfred Hitchcock, it set the standard for horror and tension in the movie world over. Now it has been re-done! It’s a brilliant remake by Brooklyn native Yuliya Tsukerman. Her medium for this new re-make is the very apt jack-o-lantern. Tsukerman spent two weeks carving various parts of the shower scene, fitting up to three shots on each pumpkin. Through great framing, fast movement, jump cuts, and the accompaniment of the original audio mix, Tsukerman’s pumpkin remake achieves every ounce of fear and tension of the original. Enjoy the show... ...
Creativity

Breathtaking textures of nature captured in abstract photographs

With one push of a button the shutter sounds and an image is captured. But if you've ever picked up a camera you know it's so much more than that. Not only are you capturing a moment, but an emotion, a presence, sending a message. Photographer Thorsten Scheuermann is doing just that with his new collection called 'Abstract.' Capturing the abstract textures of nature, Thorsten takes us around the globe to see those things so often enjoyed, but easily forgotten. From the cascading glow of a lava flow to the light painted hills of Washington, these images take us to the little moments in nature that don't usually get any press, but can bring so much joy. ...
Art

Artist paints magnificent glowing waterfalls from natural pigments

Every once and awhile an artist breaks the mold... like literally smashes it on the ground. That's Hiroshi Senju. He's a world renowned artist based out of New York whose specialty is waterfalls. More specifically, waterfalls painted in the ancient tradition of nihonga - it means painting with naturally found or made colors. Breaking from his traditional forum, Senju has created a new series called 'Nightfall' that literally fights against the dark. Using acrylic and fluorescent pigments these waterfalls glow in the dark, bringing to light a scene of enigmatic poise and subdued energy. ...
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