Art

The fragility of abandoned trash preserved, collection exhibited as ‘Wood Sculpture’

Matt Johnson is one of the most eccentric young artists that come from New York. He has had many successful projects and exhibits before, but his latest one may top his list. Entitled Wood Sculpture, it simply is that: pieces of trashed, abandoned, disfigured pieces of wood that has been repurposed to show the "fragile" side of his pieces. 303 Gallery in New York currently houses the exhibit, which is quickly gaining traction from art lovers and curious fans. This takes Johnson back home. Although currently residing in Los Angeles (where he also studied his art), the artist was born in New York. It will be a sweet homecoming for the sculptor as his amazing art is featured in one of the top galleries in the area. Take a look at the photos of some of his installations and sculptures featured in the exhibition below. You can learn more about the artwork from the gallery's website. ...
Art

Check out this spring-inspired chic art featuring 2017’s color of the year: Greenery

The art-deco blog SFGirlByBay, headed by editor-in-chief Victoria Smith, is a great resource for anybody who is looking for some design inspiration. Whether it's for interior design or simple home decorating that stands out from the old and stale, then you can count on this site to get fresh and zesty ideas from each post. One particular idea shared by Smith is the use of "greenery" as an update to your decor's color palette. More specifically, using art that has spring-like themes and colors. This eliminates the challenge of adding art and color, because it hits two birds in one stone. Check out the photos below to get a clearer picture. These are from Smith's curated art collection in collaboration with Art.com. Whether you're from San Francisco or not, these can definitely give you tons of decorating ideas that you can try out at home. ...
Art

A silent revolt: Using images and art to address our culture’s most critical issues

Perpetual Revolution: The Image and Social Change is an exhibition that is more than fitting, given our current societal cloud. The display of various artwork tackles six crucial issues that have been transformed by visual culture: #BlackLivesMatter, gender fluidity, climate change, terrorist propaganda, the right-wing fringe and the 2016 election, and the refugee crisis. It is a movement that proposes that a revolution is ongoing with regard to our politics and society - including technological innovations that allow the creation and spread of images - all of which have massive impact on social change. Over the past years, the transformation in our country's politics and culture have been epic and require our utmost attention. Perpetual Revolution takes a hard look at the image world that we are facing. It challenges us to explore the ever-changing and often-violent behaviors that come with it. This exhibit is truly mirroring the tradition of ICP in looking...
Art

L.C. Armstrong takes New York by flowers

Marlborough Gallery launched another art exhibition for L.C. Armstrong newest work entitled Signals at Sunset. The exhibit opened on February 8th and will run until March 4th. As announced, Signals at Sunset continues Armstrong’s explorations of the surreal and the hyperreal. Expanding upon the language of Magic Realism these flowerscapes, a term coined by writer Luanne McKinnon, depict bright, intensely detailed flowers over maximalist landscapes both real and imagined. This artist's practice of layering acrylic on linen panels imparts a luminosity and a pearly, otherworldly glow to her works. Radiance often comes from an imposing sun and the flowers that populate the paintings loom larger than life and are often improbably bright. Armstrong was born in Humboldt, Tennesse. She worked multiple jobs to be able to send herself to school. She finished Fine Arts both from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena in '82 and San Francisco Art Institute in San...
Art

Photos tackle importance of play to children in hostile environments

Mark Neville's photographs often focus on difficult circumstances, such as hazardous waste dumps and war, as well as the latter's offshoots like post-traumatic stress disorder. In his new exhibition, titled "Child's Play" and which features works collected over a 15-year period, children and the importance of play in their lives stand front and center. The theme may sound like a respite from the unpleasant realities Neville usually tackles with his art, but the catch is many of the children in the photographs are pictured in hardly livable places: a refugee camp in Kenya and a war-torn region in Ukraine, among others. In these dangerous environments, play is a breathing space, according to Neville. Play is "an outlet, a release, a kind of therapy,” the photographer said. "It allows children “to make sense of the horrors going on in the adult world and deal with them." "Child's Play" was launched on Feb. 3 and will run until April 30 at the Foundling Museum in London....
Art

Japanese illustrator Maori Sakai perfectly captures happiness in her artwork

Born and raised in Japan, Maori Sakai has never seen herself doing anything other than creating interestingly cute, whimsical art. After attending Kuwasawa Design School in Tokyo for three years, she went on to work for a production company for another three years and is currently producing charming illustrations and lively GIFs for magazines and art websites as a freelance. Thoka Maer, Olivia Hynh, and Jen Mann are just a few of her favorite artists. She also mentions Studio Ghibli and Walt Disney, two of the greatest animation companies of all time, as her childhood heroes. When asked where she gets her inspiration, she tells Giphy she’s inspired by life. And it’s pretty evident in her work which, according to her, in essence, is capturing “my feelings and all the daydreaming.” With her unbelievable attention to detail and adorable portrayal of stories evolving coffee, people, and cats, her stories perfectly tell the subtle innocence in genuine happiness....
Architecture

The greatest architectural project in London that was never built

Mies van der Rohe, one of the influential architects behind the rise of modernist architecture, was very specific with the projects he wanted to design. As opposed to fellow modernists Le Corbusier and Frank Lloyd Wright, he insisted on “making the existing city beautiful” rather than creating utopian visions that can also be concluded as fantasies. True to his beliefs, the Mansion House Square was conceived. But it was only after his death that inquiries were made and the design was consequently denied. It was Mies’ classic “skin and bones” architecture with all the meticulously detailed planning and industrial steel. In one smart move, it would have been able to address the complicated traffic grid surrounding the Bank of England. And, adjacent to the City Mayor’s residence, a public square would have been created for the people – an ingenious yet controversial scheme. The discussion about Mies’ unbuilt Mansion House Square still continues on...
Art

British Antarctic Survey data manager takes majestic photos of Antarctica for 366 days

Many a professional and amateur photographer have challenged themselves to take at least one photo of each day for 365 days, or one year. Michal Krzysztofowicz, from Poland, took it up a notch quite literally and did so for 366 days, and in an out-of-the-ordinary place at that: the frozen Antarctica. Krzysztofowicz's project ran from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31 last year, a leap year, which made it possible for the undertaking to cover 366 days. And as if the project isn't interesting enough, Krzysztofowicz took pictures of the seemingly boundless natural landscapes and atmosphere, the breathtaking Aurora Australis and the mighty emperor penguins while working as a data manager for the British Antarctic Survey at the Halley Research Station. "I have been into photography for several years before I came South, with my favorite genres having been landscapes and underwater photography," Krzysztofowicz said. When I came to Halley for my second winter, I decided it would...
Design

Two teenagers just solved your ice cream cone problems and it is delicious!

Fact: Ice cream can melt. And unless you’re a serious napkin hoarder or savage enough to lick those trickling lines of gooey sweetness, you’re at risk of getting yourself spoiled. Luckily for you ice cream lovers, 14-year-olds Oliver Greenwald and Sam Nassif from Colorado have provided an effective, yummy solution to your ice cream problems. The Drip Drop, an edible ring made out of waffle ingredients, is an ingenious idea conceived by the youngsters at an amazing age of 10. It’s basically a ring that catches any ice cream drips which you can easily slide onto the cone – and it comes in two flavors: Original and Chocolate. The two teenage designers already won 2nd place at the Gates Invention competition for the design and have scored a U.S. Design Patent just last 2015. Oliver and Sam believe that with the use of the delectable Drip Drops, people can forego using napkins and in turn save “approximately one million trees” every year. ...
Architecture

Urban farming prototype Growroom appeared in Copenhagen’s 2016 Chart Art Fair

Growroom, an artistic project made to answer the demands of urban farming, was seen in Copenhagen’s 5th CHART ART FAIR held at the heart of the city. The art event, staged in central Charlottenborg, was established in 2013 with the concept of challenging “the boundaries and experience of a traditional art fair.” Designed by the collaborative community of Space10, Growroom is the first pocket farm of its kind to provide urban solutions for the growing problems of sustainability and demand for fresh produce. With “food producing architecture” in mind, lead architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum designed the spherical greenhouse to enable users to plant and harvest greens and herbs using the built-in plant boxes. It is transportable and compact in size that can transform it into both an artistic display and a food haven in one. Similar to all their other innovative projects, the “future-living lab and exhibition space” Space10’s main purpose...
Animation

Award-winning animation ‘Simorgh’ claims numerous awards and high praise from all over the world

The choreographical piece Simorgh is Iranian-born Meghdad Asadi Lari's own elucidation of a customary Sufi ballad. The Conference of the Birds by Farid ud-Din Attar is an extensive and praised ballad written in Persian exploring the delicacy of self-esteem. Every bird speaks to a human blame, for example, self-image, covetousness, excellence and power. The birds must cross seven valleys to achieve the residence of the unbelievable Simorgh bird, whom they trust will be their leader. Meghdad's animated adaptation incorporates the peacock, which symbolizes the fallen soul in partnership with Satan, the songbird symbolizing the lover, and the parrot looking for the wellspring of eternity, not God. As the enlivened story depends on writing, Meghdad devoted all the visuals – the fowls and their surroundings - to Iranian culture, art and history. It's been broadly perceived at a universal level, winning a few global film and movement...
Art

Exceptional artwork uses color manipulation to create reality from artist’s innermost ideas

Pawel Nolbert is an artist, illustrator, and designer. During the previous decade, he picked up experience making visual work, design, and art for brands like Google, Apple, Nike, Sony, Microsoft and more. His work has been highlighted in various printed and advanced productions, such as Taschen's “Illustration Now 3” and Springer's “Digital Da Vinci”. Nolbert worked for OPPO and made the brand's wallpaper for their ColorOS 2.1 - the OPPO Android-based operating system. The wallpaper needed to highlight the OPPO mark hues and demonstrate a vivacious, dynamic composition. One of his designs has been incorporated into an arrangement of the default framework wallpaper and now accompanies Android 4.4 devices. He took the human battle to comprehend reality, too. Pawel's "Constructed" series is a cluster of his travel photographs that have been changed to make his ideas a reality. You don't have to scroll exceptionally far through Pawel's work to...
Animation

Realistic 3D models of office TV show fan favorites Mad Men, Suits, Parks and Rec, and more

Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be walking inside Mad Men’s mid-century modernist-inspired interiors? Or slacking around and playing technological geek inside the messy nest of the genius bunch in The It Crowd? We all have, at one point in our lives, wanted to replace our normal, mediocre corporate life with one of our favorite TV show cast’s complicated yet much more interesting life of cocktails and lawsuits. And this cool new 3D project might just fulfill those sitcom dreams. The team of real estate professionals at Drawbotics made exquisitely detailed 3D models of top rating office TV shows from scratch, relying only on research and meticulousness. These models are made to take the audience into a realistic, one-of-a-kind walkthrough of the offices from fan favorites Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Parks and Recreation, Silicon Valley, and even Suits – just to name a few. These workplaces were perfectly recreated from the floor plans down to the smallest...
Culture

Witness the WiFi revolution in Havana through these captivating photos

Cuba has got 35 WiFi hotspots and absolutely busy citizens. After many years of expensive wifi connection possibilities, Cuba opened free hotspots around the country and the pictures below will show you how this affected the happy citizens. Just a year ago, most tourists couldn’t easily connect to the internet; the service was expensive and terribly slow. Well, things are finally changing! Talented British documentary photographer Jason Larkin captured photo collections that show us the current mood of "the nation on the internet". Take a look. ...
Art

The beautiful world of frozen Baikal Lake

During the winter, the world’s deepest lake (1,642 meters) freezes over to a thickness of 5 to 6.5 feet. The ice forms are stunningly beautiful and many visitors go to the Baikal Lake just to experience a breathtaking nature in front of their eyes.  Ice cracks all the time and this makes for some creepy sounds. Photographer Kristina Makeeva walked the lake and made incredible photographs. Through her lance, Baikal looks like a place from the winter fairy tale. For Makeeva's experience during the adventure in the frozen Baikal, read here. ...
Architecture

San Francisco: the street mural haven

San Francisco is not labeled the cultural, commercial, and financial center of Northern California for nothing. Have you been to the city? It's a popular tourist destination not only because of its cool summers, steep rolling hills, fantastic architecture and landmarks (hello, Golden Gate Bridge!) but also because of its incredible street art. For the art-loving tourists, a visit to Haight Street, 24th Street, Balmy Alley, Osage Alley, Cypress Street, Lilac Alley, and Clarion Alley will be the best part of the tour. These streets and alleys are highly concentrated with murals and graffitis. The history of this public art in San Francisco goes a long way back. It was Diego Rivera who first took a brush and used the city walls as a canvas for his arts in the 1930s. Other artists followed suit which eventually made the city a global hotspot for outdoor public art. Today, these arts are used as a medium to either send a message (mostly political and social) or to simply...
Art

Psychedelic, grungy, retro music art that will take you back to the 60’s and 70’s

Edwin Servaas is an illustrator and designer based in Curaçao, but his roots are from Northern Amsterdam. His novel style is crisp and influenced by the previous decades, particularly the mid 60's to the late 70's. He said that he adores making art and does it constantly, whether it's for a paying client or not. Consolidated with expansive agency involvement (with enormous name customers) and a couple of years acting as a studio chief, Servaas is able to work in either professional or personal levels. His affection for music led him to take a shot at album artwork and fine art for a London-based band.  At first, when he started doing art, he constantly fantasized about re-imagining The Beatles' epic "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds". He describes his style as grungy, psychedelic meets punk, grungy, dirty and retro. See some of his music artwork here. ...
Animation

Tons of artists collaborate to create artwork based from ‘Rick and Morty’, now on display at gallery

From the gallery in 1988's Rick and Morty tribute art show, we are going to see a ton more interesting things. Presently entering its fourth year, the Los Angeles popular culture fine art gallery is welcoming the new year with a show themed with the "adult" Cartoon Network series. The animated science fiction sitcom takes after the misfortunes of alcoholic distraught scientist Rick Sanchez and his grandson Morty. The pair invests their energy between residential life and strange and hazardous adventures through the universe. With added pressures inside the family, these experiences cause Morty much pain at home and school. The setting of Rick and Morty - portrayed as having shades of Futurama and South Park - was initially reported as 2012, trailed by another period of 10 half-hour scenes in 2015. Approximately 50 artists have made unique work propelled by the show, and these craftsmanships will be available for purchase from January 13 onwards at Gallery 1988....
Architecture

Frames and mirrors are more than just boring implements for French artist Mathias Kiss — they’re the artworks

Frames are objects of utility, there to fulfill practical functions rather than serve any more noble purpose, such as inspiring one to reflect on a given subject, as art is designed to do. But that's not the case for designer Mathias Kiss. For him, a frame, presented in a certain way, can be more than a material used to define the realm of an artwork; it can also be a thing of artistic value in itself in that he can use it to provoke thought. For the French artist, frames -- as well mirrors, which are equally mundane in their existence as implements --  can be artworks, ones that can decidedly go against classicism, as one might expect. "My inspiration comes from a reaction to my historical past, which I confront with fashion, music and with contemporary culture," he told The Globe and Mail. Kiss, born in Hungary, uses his training in painting and classicism as a counterpoint for what he intends to achieve with his art. "It’s the materials and codes of French classicism that I use...
Art

Adventurous egg-like creatures in surreal digital illustrations

If you were enamored by the Humpty Dumpty fairytale as a child, these surreal illustrations by Antanas Gudonis will serve as a dose of nostalgia. The Helsinki-based illustrator has a portfolio full of these wonderful illustrations part of a personal project. Each digital work features round, egg-like characters seemingly midway through an adventure. The works combine surrealism and a hint of nostalgia as you see the little Humpty Dumpty-inspired critters walking around like penguins. Check out some of the illustrations below and find more on Gudonis' Behance. ...
Photography

Retro-modern hybrid camera made entirely out of recyclable cardboard

When people hear the word “vintage,” they automatically think it’s a collectible item coming from a previous outdated era. Not this analog camera, though. Jollylook is the first camera of its kind that is able to merge both the vintage look of a 19th-century fold-out camera and the benefits of modern instant film. What is more interesting about it is the fact that it’s made completely from eco-friendly, 100% recyclable cardboard and is, according to the startup’s website, “as dangerous to the environment as a banana peel.” This hybrid project was originally conceived while Ukrainian co-founder Oleg Khalip was introducing his son to the interior workings of a basic analog camera. The style and look of the camera are undeniably retro, but can instantly develop a photo within seconds with the use of the Instax mini film. Its 100mm lens enables users to shoot photos that range from landscape to portrait with the help of a Fresnel lens as a viewfinder. You can...
Art

Havana hosts ‘Fashion Art’, becomes a destination for fashion lovers and art fans alike

Fashion Art Havana is the latest event in the Fashion Art series, spearheaded by Manuel Fernandez, a Spanish designer who has traveled the world and worked with more artists than he can count. His goal is to create one-off garments that meet at the crossroads of art and fashion. In an interview, he said that "art doesn't have to always be hung on walls, it could also be on floor tiles, earrings, tights or many other places." Adding to that, a participating artist, Jorge Perugorria, also said that "fashion is also art, and this is a concept we need to start understanding here." All of the artists that participated had very positive hopes for the event, and for the objective behind it. They pray that this will help the rest of the world see Cuba as a fashion destination and an art haven, not just a mere communist territory where consumerists and capitalists can indulge as they please. ...
Art

Museum of Modern Art stands up against the travel ban by featuring works by artists from Muslim-majority countries

We've all heard the news. New President Donald Trump has ordered a travel ban for people (even legal US citizens) who come from Muslim-majority countries. While this is happening, massive disagreement is taking place, and MoMA is doing a silent protest in its own way. The Museum of Modern Art in NYC (merely two blocks from Manhattan's Trump Tower) changed its usual displays overnight. Now, it features and highlights works created by artists who came from Muslim-majority nations, specifically those affected by the ban. On February 2, seven art pieces were installed on the fifth floor. Next to Iraninan artist Siah Armajani's sculpture, an accompanying wall text makes it clear where they stand. The text reads: "This work is by an artist from a nation whose citizens are being denied entry into the United States, according to a presidential executive order issued on Jan. 27, 2017. This is one of several such artworks from the Museum’s collection installed throughout...
Architecture

The 7th Room is a 33-foot tall treehouse in the Swedish woods

The 7th Room puts a whole new shine on the concept of tree houses. The structure is one of seven cabins available from northern Sweden’s Treehotel and offers a stunning view of the Aurora Borealis. The 7th Room was designed by architecture firm Snøhetta and features a base with black and white images of pine trees that give the illusion of reflection. The 33-foot tall cabin camouflages itself into the surrounding woods and floor-to-ceiling windows provide gorgeous views at all angles. Check it out below and find the other six cabins, like The Mirror Cube, on their website. ...
Art

Apple project manager turned artist made new knots each day for a year

Windy Chien devoted a year to learn a new knot everyday. From January of 2016 to December 31st 2016, the artist learned how to make 366 unique knots. That's 366 knots out of 3,900 mentioned in Chien’s knot manual, The Ashley Book of Knots. What's amazing is that it took its authors nearly 11 years to compile that instructional book. Talk about dedication! Windy Chien was formerly employed as a project manager at Apple and found the knot-learning daily ritual to be meditative as well as informative. Check out some of the knots below and find more on her website and Instagram. ...
Art

Artist duo creates majestic paper installation at the Hermès store in Dubai

Hermès visitors in Dubai were welcomed by a wonderful paper sculpture installation by Zim & Zou. The duo specializes in making some of the most intricate and beautiful paper sculptures ever and this series really shows off their collective talents of Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann. Each piece is essentially a village with its own tiny characters out and about. The set-up is incredibly eye-catching in comparison to everything else in the mall it's situated in. Check it out below and find more of their latest work on Instagram and Behance. ...
Architecture

Monochromatic 2D art created with computational tools and code featured in CCA exhibition

The California College of the Arts' (CCA) new Hubbell Street Galleries has recently hosted an exhibition featuring 22 commissioned works which take a closer look at the wide range of possibilities coming from computational tools without style restraints. Entitled “Drawing Codes: Experimental Protocols of Architectural Representation,” it is curated by CCA architecture faculty Andrew Kudless and Adam Marcus, AIA, with Clayton Muhleman. The exhibition focuses on the issues of representation, and this is made possible by limiting the works to 2D and monochrome settings. Also, an essential requirement for the artists was to use code either as a generative constraint, as a language, as a cipher, or as a script. “One of the things that I didn’t necessarily plan or expect is how that even with the focused and highly constrained call that we issued to the participants, the show represents a pretty compelling cross-section through contemporary architectural...
Art Creativity Photography Design Sculpture Funny Illustration Video Inspiration Digital Graphic Design Industrial design Architecture Fashion Technology Painting Street art Furniture News Retro Interior Design Vintage Music Artwork Nature Culture Typography Performance Logo design Cute Books Animation Food and Beverage Textile Web design Unique Sponsored